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EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

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EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

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EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

On cell phoneBack in 1996, when the Federal Communications Commission set a legal maximum on cell phone radiation, Motorola was touting its tiny $2,000 StarTac, the first clamshell phone and an early adopter of — texting!

Sixteen years later, cell phones — with 6 billion subscriptions worldwide and counting — have revolutionized how we communicate. The technology that powers them has changed just as dramatically. Today s smartphones vibrate, rock out, show high-def movies, make photos and videos, issue voice commands, check email, go underwater, navigate with global positioning systems and surf the web in 3-D. They sport dual core processors and batteries that let you or your kid — talk for close to 20 hours. (The StarTac maxed out at just 3 hours.)

On cell phoneYet those 16-year-old FCC rules still stand. Are they up to the job of protecting the public from radiation coming out of those multi-tasking marvels and the networks that enable them?

Studies conducted by numerous scientific teams in several nations have raised troubling questions about possible associations between heavy cell phone use and serious health dangers. The World Health Organization has declared that cell phone radiation may be linked to brain cancer. Ten studies connect cell phone radiation to diminished sperm count and sperm damage. Others raise health concerns such as altered brain metabolism, sleep disturbance and behavioral changes in children.

These studies are not definitive. Much more research is needed. But they raise serious questions that cast doubt on the adequacy of the FCC rules to safeguard public health. The FCC emissions cap allows 20 times more radiation to reach the head than the body as a whole, does not account for risks to children s developing brains and smaller bodies and considers only short-term cell phone use, not frequent calling patterns over decades.

The FCC s safety standards for cell phone radiation were based on studies conducted in the 1980s, These studies have long since been rendered obsolete by newer research. Yet for years the FCC refused to update or even review its standards. Instead, the federal agency simply sat on its hands while cell phones became ever more powerful and ubiquitous.

The agency is finally moving to meet the realities of the 21st century and the Information Age. On June 15, FCC chairman Julius Genachowski circulated a proposal to his four fellow commissioners calling for formal review of the 1996 regulations. To advance, his plan must be approved by a majority of the commissioners. If they agree, the FCC could take the long overdue step of modernizing its safety standards. But the pace is likely to be glacial.

Consumers need — now more than ever — real-world, relevant data on how much radiation their phones emit under various circumstances. The FCC does not require the cell phone industry to disclose these data. One important study showing that certain networks could expose consumers to 30 to 300 times more radiation than other networks was hidden from the public until the information was dated to the point of irrelevancy.

Given this appalling lack of information in the face of a cell phone market where just about anything goes,

the Environmental Working Group is suspending publication of the EWG guide to cell phones until the FCC makes the responsible decision to require cell phone makers to generate and disclose data about device and network emissions under real-world conditions. We strongly believe that as cell phones become more powerful and ubiquitous, it is critical that people have a right to know how much radiation they can expect their cell phones to generate. As things now stand, the FCC s cell phone safety rules are as obsolete as the StarTac.

In the meantime, EWG recommends that consumers take steps to reduce their exposures to cell phone radiation by holding phones away from their bodies, using earpieces and following and other simple tips in EWG s updated Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use.



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Where is arizona on the us map \ Video

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Where is arizona on the us map

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  • 1 Excluding military abroad.

Arizona, constituent state of the United States of America. Arizona is the sixth largest state in the country in terms of area. Its population has always been predominantly urban, particularly since the mid-20th century, when urban and suburban areas began growing rapidly at the expense of the countryside. Some scholars believe that the state’s name comes from a Basque phrase meaning “place of oaks,” while others attribute it to a Tohono O’odham (Papago) Indian phrase meaning “place of the young (or little) spring.” Arizona achieved statehood on February 14, 1912, the last of the 48 conterminous United States to be admitted to the union.

Arizona is a land of contradictions. Although widely reputed for its hot low-elevation desert covered with cacti and creosote bushes, more than half of the state lies at an elevation of at least 4,000 feet (1,200 metres) above sea level, and it possesses the largest stand of evergreen ponderosa pine trees in the world. Arizona is well known for its waterless tracts of desert, but, thanks to many large man-made lakes, it has many more miles of shoreline than its reputation might suggest. Such spectacular landforms as the Grand Canyon and the Painted Desert have become international symbols of the region’s ruggedness, yet Arizona’s environment is so delicate that in many ways it is more threatened by pollution than are New York City and Los Angeles. Its romantic reputation as a wild desert and a place of old-fashioned close-to-the-earth simplicity is at variance with the fact that after the 1860s the state’s economy became industrial and technological long before it was pastoral or agrarian.

Arizona is located in the southwestern quadrant of the conterminous states, bordered by California to the west, Nevada to the northwest, Utah to the north, New Mexico to the east, and the Mexican state of Sonora to the south. The Colorado River forms the boundary with California and Nevada. Phoenix, situated in the south-central part of the state, is the capital and largest city. Area 113,990 square miles (295,233 square km). Population (2010) 6,392,017; (2018 est.) 7,171,646.

Plate tectonics—the shifting of large, relatively thin segments of Earth’s crust—and stream erosion have done the most to create Arizona’s spectacular topography. Specifically, the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate came into contact and created the major tectonic forces that uplifted, wrinkled, and stretched Arizona’s geologic crust, forming its mountain ranges, basins, and high plateaus. Over the course of millennia, rivers and their tributaries have carved distinctive landforms on these surfaces.

To Arizona’s two major physiographic divisions, the Colorado Plateau and the Basin and Range Province, geologists add the Transition Zone (or Central Highlands). The northeastern two-fifths of Arizona is part of the scenic Colorado Plateau. Far less rugged than adjacent portions of the plateau in Utah, these tablelands in Arizona consist mainly of plains interrupted by steplike escarpments. Although they are labeled mesas and plateaus, their ruggedness and inaccessibility have been exaggerated. The incomparable Grand Canyon of the Colorado River provides the major exception to what has proved to be an area easily traversed. Forest-clad volcanic mountains atop the plateaus provide the state’s highest points: Humphreys Peak, 12,633 feet (3,851 metres), in the San Francisco Mountains, and Baldy Mountain, 11,403 feet (3,476 metres), in the White Mountains.

More than 200 miles (320 km) of the southern border of the Colorado Plateau is marked by a series of giant escarpments known collectively as the Mogollon Rim. West and south of the rim, a number of streams follow narrow canyons or broad valleys south through the Transition Zone and into the Basin and Range Province. The Transition Zone bordering the plateaus comprises separated plateau blocks, rugged peaks, and isolated rolling uplands so forbidding that they remained mostly unexplored until the late 19th century. The zone marks the ecological border between the low deserts and the forested highlands; it combines elements of both with, for example, the Spanish bayonet of the Sonoran Desert growing alongside the juniper characteristic of higher elevations.

The Basin and Range region of the southern and western third of the state contains the bulk of the population but none of the large canyons and mesas for which Arizona is famous. It consists largely of broad, open-ended basins or valleys of gentle slope. Isolated northwest-to-southeast–tending mountain ranges rise like islands in the desert plain.

Contrary to desert stereotypes, sand dunes are nearly nonexistent, and stony desert surfaces are seldom visible except in the far southwestern portion of the state. The younger soils of river floodplains provide the more-desirable soils for agriculture.

Virtually all of Arizona lies within the Colorado River drainage system. The Gila River, with its major feeder streams—the Salt and the Verde—is by far the Colorado’s main Arizona tributary.

The Black, White, and Verde rivers are the primary perennial tributaries of the Salt River, which enters the Gila River southwest of Phoenix. Only during the infrequent—and occasionally devastating—flood periods does runoff water advance downstream past the numerous dams built on the Salt’s system. The Gila River rises in that part of the Mogollon Rim located in western New Mexico, and it includes another and smaller Mogollon Rim tributary, the San Francisco River. Two intermittent southern Arizona streams, the Santa Cruz and San Pedro rivers, flow northward into the Gila, while two other intermittent streams, the Agua Fria and Hassayampa rivers, drain central Arizona southward into the Gila. Dams and irrigation systems, except on rare occasions, leave the Gila River dry for most of its length.

The Little Colorado River—which drains the Mogollon Rim’s lee side and flows from southeast to northwest into the Colorado River between Marble Canyon and the Grand Canyon—draws and transports little water from its large watershed. Because of the rain shadow effect on the Mogollon Rim’s lee side, the Little Colorado usually is no more than a trickle and often is dry. Several other small and intermittent streams, such as the Bill Williams River, drain a large but arid part of western Arizona.

About half of Arizona is semiarid, one-third is arid, and the remainder is humid. The Basin and Range region has the arid and semiarid subtropical climate that attracts most winter visitors and new residents. January days in Phoenix receive more than four-fifths of the possible sunshine and have a mean maximum temperature of 65 °F (18 °C). Occasional light frosts occur at most locations in the Basin and Range region in winter, and some precipitation interrupts the exceedingly dry springs and mildly dry falls. Daily maximum readings average 106 °F (41 °C) in Phoenix in July, and nighttime temperatures drop to an average of 81 °F (27 °C).

Moisture-laden air from the Gulf of California and the eastern Pacific Ocean appears in July, bringing more than two months of irregular but sometimes heavy thundershowers that are locally referred to as the “summer monsoon.” Phoenix and Tucson receive about 1 inch (25 mm) of precipitation in July and about 3 inches (75 mm) total throughout the summer months. Winter rains come from the Pacific.

The Colorado Plateau has cool to cold winters and a semiarid climate. Average mile-high elevations and direct exposure to polar air masses can produce January mean high and low temperatures as divergent as the 46 °F (8 °C) and 19 °F (− 7 °C), respectively, in Winslow. Year-round temperatures in Flagstaff are generally 30 °F (17 °C) cooler than those of Phoenix. Most of the region receives from 10 to 15 inches (250 to 375 mm) of precipitation annually, with the Mogollon Rim and White Mountains receiving the state’s largest average, 25 inches (625 mm).

Because of the great diversity of relief within the Transition Zone, climatic conditions there vary widely over small areas. Much of Arizona’s humid area lies in this zone and in the adjacent high southern edge of the Colorado Plateau. There, perennial streams flowing through shaded riparian corridors contribute to atmospheric moisture, resulting in temperatures that are several degrees cooler than those of the nearby deserts.

Plant and animal life

Considering the variety in relief and climate, it is not surprising to find similar diversity in the state’s vegetation. About one-tenth of Arizona is forested, one-fourth is woodland, one-fourth is grassland, and the rest is desert shrub. Elevations above 6,000 to 7,000 feet (1,800 to 2,100 metres) host forests of ponderosa pine, topped in the highest areas by Douglas and other firs, spruces, and aspen. From 4,500 to 7,500 feet (1,375 to 2,300 metres) in the northern half of the state, piñon pine and juniper predominate, while evergreen oak and chaparral grow between 4,000 and 6,000 feet (1,400 and 1,800 metres) in the central mountains. Plains grasses cover about one-third of the Colorado Plateau, and Sonoran or desert grass carpets the higher elevations of the basins. Mesquite trees have invaded many former grasslands in the south. Cacti grow throughout the state, with the greatest variety below 2,000 feet (600 metres). Foothills in the Tucson-Phoenix area carry giant saguaro cacti of the Sonoran Desert, matched in areas of the northwest Basin and Range by dramatic stands of Joshua trees. Shrubs dominate the lowest portions of all areas: big sagebrush and saltbush in the Colorado Plateau, creosote bush in the Basin and Range.

Animal life is even more varied, with representatives of the Rocky Mountain, Great Plains, and Mexican ecological communities. Important larger mammals are black bears, deer, desert bighorns, antelope, and wapiti (elk). The tropical coatimundi, a raccoonlike mammal, has spread northward into Arizona, while the javelina, or peccary (wild pig), is a favourite game animal in the south. Among the several cats, the bobcat and the mountain lion (puma) are most characteristic of Arizona. Coyotes, skunks, and porcupines abound, as do cottontails, jackrabbits, and several varieties of foxes. The state’s southern border area lies along a major flyway and is rich in birdlife, which attracts thousands of watchers. Game birds include turkeys and a variety of quails, doves, and waterfowl. Among native fish are the Arizona trout and the Colorado squawfish. Venomous animals include rattlesnakes, scorpions, and Gila monsters.

Population composition

The indigenous peoples of Arizona are renowned for their rich cultural diversity. However, since the 19th century, the urbanized segments of the state have been cultural outposts that have more obviously reflected tastes, fashions, speech, religious preferences, political attitudes, and life-styles that have come from such diverse localities as Chicago, New York City, Washington, D.C., San Francisco, and Los Angeles.

Until the latter half of the 19th century, except for very small and scattered groups of indigenous peoples, almost all of central and northern Arizona remained uninhabited. Most of the Spanish occupation of the state was tentative at best and, owing to the constant danger posed by actively hostile Apache bands, remained confined to a few intermittently occupied missions, presidios, and ranches in the Santa Cruz valley, south of Tucson.

At the time of Arizona’s acquisition (as part of New Mexico; see Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo) by the United States in 1848, fewer than 1,000 people of Hispanic origin lived in Arizona. Not until the 20th century did the number of Hispanic residents in Arizona soar. Today most are Mexicans or descendants of Mexicans who have arrived since 1900. Relations between Mexican Americans and Anglos (a term used by Hispanics for English-speaking whites) have at times been strained in Arizona, but in general the two ethnic groups have a history of cordiality that has often been absent in other border states. While some communities have Mexican barrios (ethnic quarters, often characterized by severe poverty), most Mexican Americans in Arizona live in a variety of neighbourhoods and participate fully in the state’s business, political, and social life. Intermarriage with Anglos is common. Although Mexican food, building styles, home furnishings, clothing, social customs, and music have been incorporated into the Arizona lifestyle and are widely shared by longtime residents, the great majority of people (most of whom are relative newcomers to the state from other parts of the country) have been affected by Mexican culture in only a superficial way. If anything, the Mexican American population has been attracted to mainstream American culture.

Although the Native American peoples of Arizona, since the time of the Spanish conquistadores, have been subjugated, badly exploited, and abused—much as they were elsewhere—this did not cause the total annihilation or permanent displacement of their population. The culture of Native Americans is very much in evidence in Arizona, although they constitute less than one-tenth of the total population. Native Americans are grouped into 15 tribes on 17 reservations that range in size from the 85-acre (34-hectare) Tonto Apache reserve to the 23,400-square-mile (60,600-square-km) reserve (nearly three-fifths of which lies in Arizona) of the Navajo. The latter tribe, numbering about 100,000 in Arizona, is deeply involved in directing the development of its land and people, and the tribal government assumes complete responsibility in many areas of Navajo social and economic life. Among the remaining tribes the best known are the legendary Apache and the much-studied Hopi. The Tohono O’odham and the Akimel O’odham (Pima) peoples have also received much attention in the anthropological and historical literature. Less well known are the Havasupai, who live at the bottom of the Grand Canyon, the Hualapai, the Yaqui, and the Yavapai. (For more information on the Havasupai, Hualapai, and Yavapai, see Yuman.)

Arizona’s African American population constitutes only a small proportion of the state’s total. Most of Arizona’s cities and towns include predominantly African American neighbourhoods, the result of de facto housing segregation. The state voluntarily desegregated its schools in the early 1940s. Asians and Pacific Islanders are growing in numbers but still constitute the smallest minorities in the state.

Settlement patterns

Despite Arizona’s romantic image as a land of picturesque ghost towns and mining camps, isolated ranches, Native American reservations, and bucolic cotton and citrus farms, virtually all of its population is concentrated in urban areas. Three-fifths of the state’s people live in just one of the state’s 15 counties—Maricopa, where Phoenix is located. Of the 15 counties, 6 collectively contain four-fifths of the state’s population. Only a small number of people live on farms and ranches. Most towns and cities have low population densities.

Buildings of adobe can be seen in the older inhabited areas of southern Arizona, while Flagstaff and Prescott—northern Arizona cities settled by New Englanders in the 1860s and ’70s—have Victorian-style houses that reflect the traditions and preferences of their first inhabitants.

Phoenix is the primary trade centre of the state. Its central location, extensive agricultural economy, and attractive vacation and retirement amenities have caused it to become one of the largest and fastest-growing urban areas in the Southwest. Tucson, while older and smaller, has acted as a doorway to Mexico and maintains well-developed commercial and medical ties with Sonora and other northern states of Mexico. Since 1970, its population growth rate has rivaled that of Phoenix.

Demographic trends

In the early 21st century Arizona’s population experienced dramatic growth at almost three times the national rate. Just over a quarter of the population was under age 18. Some of the new residents, as in the past, were “snowbirds,” retirees who spend the winter in the comparatively warm desert and return to other domiciles when the weather turns hot. So-called “white flight” from California and out-migration from declining industrial areas in the Midwestern and Eastern United States accounted for many arrivals of working age. Still other newcomers were lured by opportunities in the metropolitan areas, whose economies were beginning to mature to include desirable high-paying jobs. An untold number arrived illegally, most from Mexico and Central America, and filled the ranks of the state’s low-paid service and agricultural sectors. The overall population was projected to reach 10 million by the year 2027.

Before World War II the focus of Arizona’s economy was primary production—mineral extraction, lumbering, cattle raising, and crop growing. Since the late 1940s the focus has shifted toward manufacturing industry and services, the economy becoming one that better represents the country’s growing affluence and technology. This is especially true of the Phoenix area, where a vibrant high-technology economy has arisen.

Agriculture and livestock

Good soil, plenty of irrigation water, and a long growing season enable Arizona to produce cotton, alfalfa, and a variety of grains, vegetables, fruits, and nuts. Arizona continues to be one of the country’s leading cotton producers. For many years citrus growing has remained an important and expanding part of the state’s economy, and, more recently, wine producers have been successful growing a number of varietal grapes. Livestock products include beef, dairy goods, and poultry and eggs. The average size of farms in Arizona is larger than that in any other state, and farmers and ranchers use more than four-fifths of the state’s water.

Resources and power

Metallic ores such as copper, zinc, and, to a modest degree, silver and gold traditionally have brought revenue to the state. Coal from the Black Mesa area of the Native American reservations in northeastern Arizona is important, since coal-fired stations generate much of the electricity for the southwestern United States; the northeastern area also produces a small amount of petroleum, as well as large quantities of uranium.

Since the 1880s, northern Arizona’s massive stands of ponderosa pine have supplied a strong lumber and pulp-paper industry in the state. Rich alluvial soils, particularly in Yuma, Pinal, Pima, and Maricopa counties, have supported large and profitable agricultural operations. The state’s attractive climate and landscape can also be counted among its most valuable resources.

The natural geographic corridor created by the Colorado Plateau together with its Mogollon Rim escarpment has made possible Arizona’s irrigation projects and most of the state’s hydroelectric power, including that generated by the Roosevelt, Hoover, and Glen Canyon dams. Altogether, nearly a dozen dams control the Mogollon Rim’s runoff, impounding and diverting the water to provide flood control and lakes for water storage. This hydrologic pattern has been a source of much political and legal trouble for Arizona, including years of litigation with California over rights to water from the Colorado River system. The state’s internal sharing of water is also a major problem because groundwater has been depleted, particularly around Phoenix and Tucson, and there are no new sources of surface water. Cities have found it necessary to buy water rights from distant areas, and litigation involving municipalities, Native American tribes, and federal agencies over water rights is increasingly common.

Manufacturing

Between 1880 and 1950 the production of copper remained by far the most important industry in Arizona. Arizona is still the leading copper-producing state in the country, but manufacturing has grown to become the state’s most important basic industry, notably in electronics, communications, aeronautics, and aluminum. Although this growth has brought one of the most dynamic and affluent economies in the nation, many of Arizona’s outlying counties, particularly those with large Native American populations, remain among the poorest areas in the country.

Tourism and retirement

Urban and industrial expansion have so polluted major areas of Arizona that it no longer serves as the refuge it once did for sick people seeking pure air. The climate, scenery, and casual lifestyle, however, still attract millions of visitors each year, and the state has become a popular retirement centre, particularly in the lower desert areas. Large retirement communities such as Sun City, near Phoenix, and Green Valley, near Tucson, have continued to grow.

Transportation

Like other western states, Arizona has not emphasized the development of mass transit systems, and state and municipal governments struggle to build sufficient roads to accommodate a swelling population. It has long been so. The state’s earliest service industry was long-distance cartage over rough desert and mountain country; in modern times, the five interstate highways that pass through Arizona are crowded with heavy trucks. These highways generally follow historic roads, most of which were established along Native American trade routes and accommodated stagecoaches and freight carriers. The railroads followed in the later 19th century, with well-established east-west routes passing through southern and northern Arizona, but there was little service to the rugged interior. A greater focus on mass transit development was evident in the state’s larger cities in the early 21st century. A light-rail system that served Phoenix and the surrounding areas began operating in 2008, and Tucson launched a streetcar service in 2014.

Surface transportation is generally organized on the model of southern California, with streets on a grid pattern punctuated by freeways and highways. Within the cities some attention has been given to the development of bicycle paths. Phoenix’s Sky Harbor International Airport offers nonstop international and domestic flights; Tucson International Airport provides more-limited nonstop flights; and Flagstaff and Yuma airports have fewer still. Many other towns have airports capable of accommodating small jet aircraft, and there are numerous military airfields as well.


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SOURCE: http://www.britannica.com/place/Arizona-state

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Titans TE Delanie Walker More Motivated Than Ever as He Looks Ahead to 2019 Season

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Titans head coach Mike Vrabel and members of his coaching staff spent Saturday morning coaching Special Olympics athletes at the Music City Blitz at Nissan Stadium. (Photos: Donn Jones, Richard Suter)

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Titans GM Jon Robinson has Mike Keith and Amie Wells flustered when he crashes their party on Friday’s OTP: Road to Nashville. Today’s episode also features a preview of the top wideouts in the upcoming NFL draft, and we reveal the special two weeks of events planned for Titans Season Ticket Members leading up to the NFL Draft in Nashville.

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The OTP: Road to Nashville – April 3

Titans Radio’s Dave McGinnis joins Mike Keith and Amie Wells on Wednesday’s addition of The OTP: Road to Nashville to preview the top defensive prospects, edge rushers to be exact, in the upcoming 2019 NFL Draft. Plus, Coach Mac gives his thoughts on the new rule allowing pass interference review, and how it may affect the NFL.

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Day 2 of The OTP: Road to Nashville features a one-on-one interview with Amie Wells and Titans QB Marcus Mariota from his Motiv8 golf tournament in Hawaii. Amie, Mike Keith and Jim Wyatt also recap the 2019 Owners Meetings in Arizona and take a look ahead at the Titans’ 2019 opponents.

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Amie Wells went to Missouri’s pro day to find out more about their quarterback Drew Lock ahead of the 2019 NFL Draft in Nashville.

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Titans Honor 2018 Coach of the Week and Coach of the Year Winners

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Every week, the greatest athletes from around the globe seek to outperform each other on custom-designed tracks in front of nearly one million live fans and broadcast to millions more worldwide.

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Run with some of your favorite Titans players and coaches, and finish on the 50 yard line at Nissan Stadium, home of the Tennessee Titans.

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Concacaf Gold Cup Semifinal

The Confederation of North, Central America and Caribbean Association Football (Concacaf) announced Nissan Stadium has been awarded one of the semifinals in the Gold Cup this summer. The game will be played on Wednesday, July 3rd. Additionally, Concacaf announced the venues and dates of the seeded nations in the 2019 Concacaf Gold Cup, as well as all match dates for the other venues of the 15th edition of the confederation’s continental championship.


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Printable political Map of Illinois

Political map showing roads and major cities and political boundaries of Illinois state.

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Printable Illinois Map

This printable map of Illinois is free and available for download. You can print this political map and use it in your projects. The original source of this Printable political Map of Illinois is: YellowMaps.com. This free to print map is a static image in jpg format. You can save it as an image by clicking on the print map to access the original Illinois Printable Map file. The map covers the following area: state, Illinois, showing political boundaries and roads and major cities of Illinois.

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Get Illinois Nautical Charts at our map store. These navigational marine charts are available for purchase, and up to date with the latest Notice to Mariners.

Topographic Maps of Illinois

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Alternatively, you can buy them on disk as digital map collections: USGS digital topo maps


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Alabama vs. Florida State Official for 2017 Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game

July 9, 2015

Clash of the Titans

Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game to Open 2017 Season with
Blockbuster Matchup

The Alabama-Florida State game will be first regular-season college game played in the New Atlanta Stadium.

ATLANTA (July 9, 2015) – Two of college football’s last three national champions will meet in the Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game to open the 2017 season in epic fashion.

The 10th installment of the nation’s longest-running kickoff game will feature the Alabama Crimson Tide and the Florida State Seminoles in what will be the first regular-season college game to be played in the Falcon’s state-of-the-art New Atlanta stadium.

The game is set for Saturday, Sept. 2, 2017. Exact kick time and television network are yet to be announced.

“With two teams of this caliber, it really is going to be a bowl-game type atmosphere and an epic celebration of college football,” said Percy Vaughn, Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl chairman.

“These teams represent the best in our sport,” said Gary Stokan, Peach Bowl, Inc. president and CEO. “The best players, the best coaches, the best fans. It’s going to be a memorable start to the season and there is no better place to host this than in Atlanta, the capital of college football.”

The Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game averages more than 66,000 fans for each game – higher than 30 bowl games from last year – and its team payout averages $4.3 million, which is higher than 21 bowl games last season. Television viewership is also traditionally strong with more than 40 million viewers tuning in to the series since 2008.

Alabama and Florida State have met four times with the Crimson Tide holding a 2-1-1 advantage over the Seminoles. FSU, however, won the most recent game in 2007. The series originally dates back to 1965. This will be Alabama’s fifth appearance in the Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game, where the Tide hold a 4-0 record. It will be the first time Florida State has opened the season in Atlanta.

“This game with Florida State fits our scheduling philosophy of playing outstanding opponents in great venues in games that create great exposure for our program,” said Bill Battle, Alabama director of athletics. “Of course, it also continues our tremendous relationship with the Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game which goes back to the 2008 season opener. This game with the Seminoles will be an excellent start to the 2017 season and we’re thrilled to be a part of it.”

“This is a great opportunity to open the 2017 season against an outstanding Florida State program,” Alabama Head Coach Nick Saban said. “Jimbo has done an excellent job there and this will provide a great challenge for our team. Having this game first on the schedule will give our players plenty to look forward to and prepare for in the offseason.”

“It’s really an honor and a privilege to be a part of this first-class event hosted by the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl, which has really grown into one of the great traditions in college football. The last four times we’ve participated in the Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game, it has been a big bowl game atmosphere and I know that will again be the case with these two programs,” said Saban.

“The game with Alabama will be one of the highlights of the college football season,” said Florida State Director of Athletics Stan Wilcox. “Both schools have significant alumni bases in Atlanta, and we would expect the media coverage of the game to be on par with some of the biggest non-conference games in recent history. The exposure for our University and our athletics program will be invaluable. We look forward to the game and playing in a fantastic venue.”

“We are very excited to be opening the 2017 season against Alabama at the new Falcons stadium in Atlanta,” Florida State head coach Jimbo Fisher said. “Scheduling top non-conference opponents is critical in today’s day and age. These are two great football programs and there will be a tremendous atmosphere. It’s a great matchup for our fans and for college football. We are looking forward to the opportunity.”

The majority of the tickets will be divided between the two teams, creating a true neutral-site environment. All tickets will be sold through the university ticket offices.

The teams will battle for The Old Leather Helmet Trophy, one of college football’s iconic rivalry-game trophies. Traditionally, winners of The Old Leather Helmet don the helmet on the field after the game, starting with the head coach and then rotating from player to player as the team celebrates its victory.

Past and future Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game match-ups include:


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SOURCE: http://www.chick-fil-akickoffgame.com/alabama-vs-florida-state-official-for-2017/

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Where is arizona on the us map @ Video

#Reference #Maps #of #Arizona, #USA #- #Nations #Online #Project



Where is arizona on the us map

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___ Reference Maps of Arizona

About Arizona

Time zone: Mountain
UTC −7
Arizona doesn’t observe daylight saving time apart from the Navajo Nation


Where in the United States is Arizona? Location map of Arizona in the US.

Arizona is a landlocked US state situated in the southwestern United States, north of Mexico.

The state is bordered by Utah to the north, by New Mexico to the east, to the south by the states of Sonora and Baja California (Mexico), and to the west by California and Nevada.

Short History
The area was colonized by Spain in 1598. Arizona was part of New Spain until 1821, and then part of the short-lived Mexican Empire which became the United Mexican States. In 1846 United States forces invaded and occupied the region then known as New Mexico.

Topographic Map of Arizona. (Click the map to enlarge)

The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ended the war between the United States and Mexico in 1848. In 1850 New Mexico became a US territory. In the Gadsden Purchase of 1854, the US pays Mexico $10 million for 76,845 km² (29,670 sq mi) of Mexican territory that becomes part of Arizona and New Mexico.

The area was organized as a US territory in 1863 from lands ceded by the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848. Copper was discovered in 1854, and copper mining was Arizona’s chief industry until the 1950s.
Arizona was the 48th state and the last of the contiguous states to be admitted to the Union on 14th February 1912.

Area
Arizona occupies an area of 295,234 km² (113,990 sq mi) [1] , compared Arizona would fit into Texas about 2.4 times, the state is slightly smaller than Italy (301,318 km²) or the Philippines (300,000 km²).

Highlights of Arizona’s Landscape


Sonoran Desert at Saguaro National Park
Image: Joe Parks

Arizona is known for its desert landscape in the southern half.
The Colorado Plateau in the northern part of the state is largely made up of high desert, with scattered areas of forests. Part of the plateau is the Painted Desert and the Petrified Forest National Park.

On the Arizona-Utah state line there is Monument Valley with its well known sandstone buttes, the tallest reaching 300 m (1,000 ft) above the valley floor. The valley has been featured in many movies, especially Western movies.

Highest Elevation
Humphreys Peak is the highest natural point in the state with 3,852 m (12,637 ft) located within the Kachina Peaks Wilderness about 18 km (11 miles) north of Flagstaff.

Major Rivers


Horseshoe Bend of the Colorado River near the town of Page in Arizona,
Image: Paul Hermans

Major Rivers in Colorado are, the Colorado River, one of the principal rivers of the Southwestern United States, the Little Colorado River, a tributary of the Colorado which provides the principal drainage from the Painted Desert region, and the Gila River, another major tributary of the Colorado River; the Salt River is the largest tributary of the Gila River; the Verde River is a major tributary of the Salt River; the Santa Cruz River in southern Arizona and northern Sonora in Mexico is another major tributary of the Gila River; the Puerco River in northeastern Arizona drains an arid terrain, including parts of the Painted Desert. The Virgin River, a tributary of the Colorado forms the north arm of Lake Mead. The source of the San Francisco River is near Alpine, Arizona, it flows later into the upper Gila River. The San Pedro River in southern Arizona is also a tributary of the Gila River.

Climate
Arizona has a dry desert climate with very hot summers and temperate winters.

World Heritage Site


Desert View Watchtower. The 21 m high stone building is located on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. The four-story tower was designed by American architect Mary Colter and completed in 1932. The interior contains murals by Fred Kabotie. The upper floors serve as an observation deck from which visitors can view eastern portions of the Grand Canyon.
Image: Vladsinger

Arizona has one UNESCO World Heritage Site. In the north western part of the state is one of America’s best known natural landmarks, the Grand Canyon. It is quite certainly the most spectacular gorge on this planet.

The steep-sided canyons of layered bands of red rock is formed by the Colorado River and its tributaries over a period of the past 2 billion years. The canyon is 446 km (277 mi) long, and up to 29 km (18 mi) wide, and in places over 1,500 m (nearly 1 mile) deep.

Grand Canyon National Park is one of 23 UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the US.


The Grand Canyon, view from the South Rim.
Image: Roger Bolsius

Population


Rendered image of Arizona’s State Capitol in Phoenix. The original Classical Revival building was the seat of Arizona’s Territorial government, until Arizona became a state in 1912. The 1901 portion of the Capitol is now maintained as the Arizona Capitol Museum.
Image: Google

The Grand Canyon State (Arizona’s nickname) has a population of 7 million (2017 est.) [2] ; capital and largest city is Phoenix, second-largest city is Tucson with more than half a million people, largest metro area is Phoenix Metropolitan Area (pop. 4.2 million).

Other major cities (pop. more than 200,000) are Mesa, Chandler, Glendale, Scottsdale, and Gilbert.

Busiest airport is Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (IATA code: PHX).

The detailed map below shows the US state of Arizona with boundaries, the location of the state capital Phoenix, major cities and populated places, streams and lakes, interstate highways, principal highways, and railroads.

Cities in Arizona


Aerial view of Arizona’s capital Phoenix with Piestewa Peak in background, the second highest peak in the Phoenix Mountains.
Image: Melikamp

Map shows the location of following cities and towns in Arizona:

Major cities are: Phoenix, Tucson, Scottsdale, Tempe, Mesa, Glendale.

Other cities and towns in Arizona:
Ajo, Alpine, Ash Fork, Benson, Bisbee, Buckeye, Bullhead City, Camp Verde, Casa Grande, Chandler, Chinle, Clifton, Colorado City, Cottonwood, Douglas, Eagar, Eloy, Flagstaff, Florence, Gila Bend, Globe, Grand Canyon, Green Valley, Holbrook, Kayenta, Kingman, Lake Havasu City, Lukeville, Marana, Miami, Nogales, Oro Valley, Page, Parker, Payson, Peach Springs, Polacca, Prescott, Quartzite, Safford, San Luis, Sedona, Sells, Show Low, Sierra Vista, Snowflake, St Johns, Superior, Tombstone, Tuba City, Wickenburg, Willcox, Williams, Window Rock (Capital of Navajo Nation), Winslow, and Yuma.


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SOURCE: http://www.nationsonline.org/oneworld/map/USA/arizona_map.htm

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#Where’s tennessee on the map $ #Video

#Where’s #tennessee #on #the #map



Where’s tennessee on the map

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The Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto first visited the Tennessee area in 1540, and quickly claimed the land for Spain. This uninvited intrusion into the ancestral homeland of Native Americans would eventually prove disastrous for the Cherokee Indians and other indigenous tribes.

In their continuing search for gold and silver in the Americas, Spanish expeditions returned again and again, but they searched in vain for treasure. By the middle of the 17th century, after French and English explorations, both nations claimed this land as their own.

As European settlers from the original thirteen colonies gradually spread west, small communities were established in the northeast, along the North Carolina border. As a few hundred hardy pioneers reached the area now called Nashville, Indians were being summarily squeezed out of what was rightfully theirs, and they would eventually be forced to move further south and west just to survive.

During the French and Indian Wars (1754-1763), Great Britain defeated France and their Native American allies, thus taking control of a vast area of North America, including present day Tennessee. As the American Revolutionary War played out across the eastern colonies, west of the Appalachian Mountains, colonists against Native Americans, the British, and their loyalist supporters fought that war.

In 1780, at the Battle of King’s Mountain in North Carolina, Tennessee militiamen overwhelmed the loyalist militia led by British Major Patrick Ferguson, and helped turn the tide of the Revolution War in the South. At war’s end, hundreds of Revolutionary War veterans and their families streamed backed into Tennessee.

In the late 1780’s, a few counties in western North Carolina broke off and formed the State of Franklin. This fractured area tried to join the Union, but failed. Eventually North Carolina, after joining the Union, ceded that land to the federal government in 1790, after which it was officially organized into the Southwest Territory, land collectively corresponding to modern-day Tennessee.

In 1795, there were enough people in the Southwest Territory to petition for statehood. Then Governor Blount (appointed by George Washington) convened a constitutional convention and its delegates drafted a state constitution. The Southwest Territory was the first federal territory to petition to join the Union; after some conflicting opinions in the U.S. Congress, Tennessee was finally admitted to the Union on June 1, 1796 as the 16th state.

In 1838, as the population of Tennessee continued to grow and demand for land increased, U.S. President Martin Van Buren ordered nearly 17,000 Cherokees uprooted from their ancestral homes in Tennessee. They were subsequently forced by the U.S. military to move to Indian Territories west of Arkansas. During that brutal relocation march, an estimated 4,000 Cherokees died along the way.

Slavery and States’ Rights long fueled the desire for independence across the south. By February of 1861, six southern states had already seceded from the Union, and Tennessee joined them on June 8, 1861. Although Tennessee joined the Confederacy there was much pro-Union sentiment in the state.

“There is a terrible war coming, and these young men who have never seen war cannot wait for it to happen, but I tell you, I wish that I owned every slave in the South, for I would free them all to avoid this war.” Robert E. Lee.

Tennessee is aptly called “The Volunteer State,” as in the Civil War, it distinguished itself with military leadership, and by the brave, unwavering exploits of its native sons.


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SOURCE: http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/namerica/usstates/tn.htm

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Assurance Wireless, Get a Free Cell Phone up to 250 Min, cell phone on.

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Assurance Wireless

If you reached our Assurance Wireless page from a search, we recommend first reading our free government cell phone main page for helpful general information before reading this article.

Assurance Wireless is one of the largest and fastest growing Lifeline Assistance cell phone carriers operating in the United States. Assurance Wireless provides eligible customers with a (1) Free Cell Phone; (2) 250 FREE Voice Minutes; and (3) UNLIMITED FREE Texts each and every month. These are added automatically with no cost to you. However, if you want to go beyond the basics, you can by adding amounts as low as $5/month to get additional services, like more texts or more minutes.

They also have unlimited cell phone plans available for very reasonable prices. To top it off, you can buy Virgin Mobile Top-Up cards from thousands of retail locations across the country as well as online with a credit card or even PayPal.

Even if you do not purchase additional minutes, Assurance Wireless (and Virgin Mobile) is still compensated by the government that pays subsidies to them to cover the cost of the cell phone and monthly cell service fees. If you are struggling to pay your bills, this is something than can really help you.

So, if you were suspicious about why Assurance Wireless would give out free cell phones and minutes, you now know. They receive $10 per subscriber from the government s Universal Service Fund and YOU get a free cell phone and monthly minutes at no charge.

Get a Free Government Cell Phone From Assurance Wireless

The process of getting a free government cell phone is simple and straightforward. First, you need to see if Assurance Wireless provides service in your state. If your state is not listed below, don t fret! Assurance Wireless is quickly rolling our service to new states. Please visit this page again as we regularly update the content on this website.

In the mean time, there may be other free government cell phone providers that offer service in your state. In this case, we recommend visiting our other pages for free government cell phone carriers to determine if they provide service in your state. You can find links to numerous free cell phone carriers to the left of this article.

Next, you should review the eligibility requirements for your particular state. After this, if you think you are eligible, you simply fill out an application with supporting documentation and you will quickly find out if you can get a free cell phone from Assurance Wireless.

Assurance Wireless Eligibility Requirements

Cell phone on

Assurance Wireless Offers Free Cell Phones to Eligible Customers

Eligibility requirements for the Assurance Wireless program can vary from state to state. Consequently, we strongly recommend checking your state of residence s specific eligibility requirements before applying to Assurance Wireless. That being said, in general if you already receive government assistance, such as Food Stamps, Section 8, Social Security, Medicaid, etc, then there is a good chance you qualify for the Assurance Wireless program. Please check your state s list of eligible government assistance programs to see if you qualify for Assurance Wireless.

Even if you don t currently participate in an eligible government assistance program, you may still be able to qualify for Assurance Wireless service under income eligibility guidelines. Not all states allow applicants to qualify for service under income guidelines. However, those that do require an applicant s total household income to be at or below 100-150% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines. The majority of states that allow an applicant to qualify under income guidelines require that an applicant s total household income is at or below 135% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines. We have listed these values in the table below for your convenience.



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Cell Phone Reviews, Cell Phones Review, cell phone on.

#Cell #phone #on



Cell Phones Reviews

Top Phones on Every Carrier

We test and rate hundreds of mobile phones each year. These are the 10 best you can get right now.

Fastest Mobile Networks

Before buying your next phone, find out which carrier has the fastest data network near you.

The Best Android Phones

The greatest thing about Google’s mobile OS: Your choice of handsets on all the major wireless carriers.

Top Picks: Phones for Kids

Trust us, your kid wants a phone. But which one is best? Check out our recommendations.

Price
Brand
Service Provider
Operating System as Tested
Form Factor
Phone Capability / Network
Editors Ratings
Awards

Samsung Galaxy S8 Active Review

Bottom Line: The Samsung Galaxy S8 Active takes the best phone of the year, makes it tougher, and packs in a bigger battery. It’s the ultimate rugged phone—but it’s only available on AT ?>

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Free Government Cell Phone Plan – Service – Free Government Phones, cell phone on.

#Cell #phone #on



Free Government Cell Phone Service

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Get up to 500 anytime minutes per month and pay nothing .

Apply now for your free cellular plan and free cell phone and receive your handset in just a few days.

Easy Application

Cell phone on

It s simple to apply on-line for this Lifeline subsidized plan. Just click on your state above. Your state’s page will have an details of the wireless plan available to you and a link to the on-line ordering process.

Read the qualification requirements, fill out the form, then submit. Your order will be processsed as soon as we get your order and any required proof of qualifications documents. Your free mobile phone will be on it s way to you, ready to use with Lifeline wireless plan minutes. You should receive your new handset in just a few days.

You ll never receive a bill and your minutes will replenish every month. If you need more minutes you may purchase them at a reduced rate.

Do I Qualify for a Free Government Mobile Plan?

Cell phone on

Free government phone service is made possible by the Lifeline program. Lifeline is a Federal program that gives you a discount on basic telephone plans because it is subsidized by the government, making it more affordable for low income families. That Lifeline discount provides the free minutes for you to use each month. Those that are currently enrolled in a government assistance program like Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Medicaid, SSI, National School Lunch Free Lunch Program, etc. are qualified for Lifeline. You can also qualify based on your household income.

Expert Cellular is the place for a Free Government Phone plan.

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No Contract

A cellphone can be a life saver. Make sure your family has the security that mobile service can provide.

Free Long Distance – Your free wireless plan includes long distance calling. Eliminate those long distance charges from your home phone bill!

You can get the peace of mind knowing your loved ones are safe and secure by just calling them. Now you can have a mobile phone that will keep you in touch with those you care about. Don’t wait any longer. Fill out your application today. Start by clicking on your state.

Being available to those that need you can make a difference. Don’t miss that important call from your childs school, from your employer, or about that job interview.



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Medicaid Cell Phone – Medicaid Cell Phone, cell phone on.

#Cell #phone #on



Medicaid Cell Phone Program

This program was created in the 1980 s to make sure that low income families and individuals had access to a phone for basic communication.

Medicaid recipients can easily get their FREE Medicaid cell phone with 250 FREE monthly minutes through any government-approved Lifeline provider. Federal regulations allow only one cell phone per household.

You can apply for your FREE cell phone right now by submitting your email address and zip code below.

To qualify for your Medicaid cell phone with monthly minutes, you must participate in a government assistance program such as Medicaid, Food Stamps (SNAP), Social Security Income (SSI) and most other government assistance programs. Criteria for the Free cell phone varies by state.

If you participate in Medicaid then you can claim your FREE cell phone in minutes! Don’t wait, apply for your Medicaid free cell phone and get connected to emergency services, doctors, family and friends today.

FROM THE BLOG Cell phone onRSS Feed | Visit our blog

  • Cell phone onMedicaid Cell Phone Program

It is possible to get a Medicaid cell phone. The Link Up and Lifeline programs have teamed up to provide Medicaid cell phones to qualifying

  • Cell phone onHow to Qualify for Medicaid

    In order to qualify for Medicaid, applicants must first fit into a certain category. These categories include children, parents of eligible children, pregnant women, and

  • Cell phone onWhat is Medicaid?

    Medicaid is a health program that is funded by the federal government but administered by the state, so each state may have its own particular

    Success Stories

    Shelly Peck (Little Rock, AR)

    Cell phone on“This program was such a big help. With my free phone I was able to keep in touch with my family and friends and schedule doctor appointments”

    Jim Mathers (Norman, OK)

    Cell phone on“I felt safer with my Lifeline phone knowing I could call someone if something happened to me. It was great for calling my grandchildren too!”

    Violet Johnson (Cleveland, OH)

    Cell phone on“After I got laid off, we had to cut our cell phone service to save money. Thanks to my free Lifeline phone I was able to schedule interviews and get back in the job market.”



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    Cell Phone Directory, Cell Phone Reverse Lookup, Cell Phone Registry, cell phone on.

    #Cell #phone #on



    cell phone on

    Cell phone on

    Welcome to the National Registry of Cellular Numbers

    NRCN is the leading cell phone directory and provider of online cell phone lookups. Our powerful cell phone directory tool searches the largest database of Landline, Mobile and Unlisted Phone Numbers to bring you the most up-to-date and accurate data. Please use the form below to lookup cell phone numbers instantly.

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    Report May Include: Full Name and Full Address associated with the number, Cell Phone or Phone Carrier information, Date of Birth, Phone Numbers, Dates of Issuance.

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    Copyright 2008 – 2017 CellphoneRegistry.org. All Rights Reserved.

    Unauthorized duplication, distribution, or copying in any way is prohibited by law and will be prosecuted.

    This website is not affiliated with the United States Government or any Federal or State government agency.

    By using this site, cell phone directory and reverse cell phone lookup, you certify that you will use any information obtained for lawfully acceptable purposes. Please be advised that it is against the law to use the information obtained from this site to stalk or harass others. Search requests on public officials, juveniles, and/or celebrities are strictly prohibited. Users who request information under false pretenses or use data obtained from this site in contravention of the law may be subject to civil criminal penalties. All searches are subject to terms of use and applicable law. Information contained herein is derived from records that may have errors and/or not always be accurate or complete.



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    Cell Phone Directory, Cell Phone Reverse Lookup, Cell Phone Registry, cell phone on.

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    cell phone on

    Cell phone on

    Welcome to the National Registry of Cellular Numbers

    NRCN is the leading cell phone directory and provider of online cell phone lookups. Our powerful cell phone directory tool searches the largest database of Landline, Mobile and Unlisted Phone Numbers to bring you the most up-to-date and accurate data. Please use the form below to lookup cell phone numbers instantly.

    Cell phone on

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    Cell phone on

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    Cell phone on

    Cell phone on

    Cell phone on

    Report May Include: Full Name and Full Address associated with the number, Cell Phone or Phone Carrier information, Date of Birth, Phone Numbers, Dates of Issuance.

    Cell phone onAddress

    Cell phone onBackground Checks

    Cell phone onCross-Checks

    Cell phone onMarriage Records

    Cell phone onCriminal Records

    Cell phone onMarriage/Divorce Records

    Cell phone onBirth Records

    Cell phone onDeath Records

    Cell phone onProperty Records

    Cell phone onAsset Information

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    Cell phone on

    Cell phone on

    Copyright 2008 – 2017 CellphoneRegistry.org. All Rights Reserved.

    Unauthorized duplication, distribution, or copying in any way is prohibited by law and will be prosecuted.

    This website is not affiliated with the United States Government or any Federal or State government agency.

    By using this site, cell phone directory and reverse cell phone lookup, you certify that you will use any information obtained for lawfully acceptable purposes. Please be advised that it is against the law to use the information obtained from this site to stalk or harass others. Search requests on public officials, juveniles, and/or celebrities are strictly prohibited. Users who request information under false pretenses or use data obtained from this site in contravention of the law may be subject to civil criminal penalties. All searches are subject to terms of use and applicable law. Information contained herein is derived from records that may have errors and/or not always be accurate or complete.



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    Inventor of cell phone: We knew someday everybody would have one, cell phone on.

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    Inventor of cell phone: We knew someday everybody would have one

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    • In 1973, Martin Cooper and his team at Motorola built, demonstrated first cell phone
    • Cooper says that first phone cost $3,900, plus 50 cents a minute to talk
    • Cooper: We knew that someday everybody would have a [cell] phone
    • Today he has several cell phones — but not an iPhone, which he gave away

    (CNN) — In 1973, Martin Cooper changed the world, although he didn’t know it yet.

    Cooper and his team at Motorola, the communications company, created maybe the only thing that runs the lives of business professionals and teenagers alike — the cell phone.

    It was the size of a brick and wasn’t commercially sold for another decade. But as Cooper demonstrated on a New York sidewalk, it worked.

    The concept of cellular technology had already been created by Motorola’s rival, AT T, whose Bell Labs introduced a system allowing calls to be moved from one cell to another while remaining on the same channel. But AT T was focusing this technology on the car phone.

    Cooper wanted people to have freedom to talk on the phone away from their cars. So in reaction, he and Motorola embarked on a project to create a more portable device.

    Motorola spent three months building a prototype for a portable, mobile handset that Cooper publicly demonstrated in April of 1973. The company’s first commercial cellular phone, the DynaTAC, went on sale 10 years later.

    Cooper, now 81, is founder of ArrayComm, a company working to improve cellular networks, smart antenna and wireless communication. He and his wife are also inventors of the Jitterbug, a simplified cell phone geared to senior citizens.

    Cell phone on

    Cooper was surprised when his landline dropped our call. After calling him back on his mobile, we had a chance to ask him about the creation of the device that changed the face of communication as we know it.

    Here is an edited transcript of our conversation:

    CNN: What was the technology climate like back in 1973, and what gave you the idea to move with the cell phone and compete with AT T’s car phone?

    Cooper: There were no large-scale integrated circuits, no computers, no closed-circuit televisions, no LCD screens — I can’t tell you all the things that did not exist in 1973. But, we’d been building phones for years and years in cars, and we [Motorola] thought the time was ready for personal communication, ’cause people are just naturally mobile.

    For 100 years, people wanting to talk on the phone have been constrained by being tied to their desks or their homes with a wire, and now we’re going to trap them in their cars? That’s not good.

    So we decided to take on AT T. By 1973, we decided to put on a dazzling presentation, and I decided the best way to do that was to build a phone and have someone actually have the experience of talking on a real personal handheld telephone. And that was the genesis of that phone that we built.

    When did you make that first phone call? Who was it to?

    I thought everybody knew the answer to that question! The first public call was made out on the streets of New York. It was to [Joel S. Engel], the head of the cellular program at AT T. I called and told him, Joel, I’m calling you from a cellular phone, a real cellular phone, a handheld, portable, real cellular phone.

    I don’t remember exactly what he said, but it was really quiet for a while. My assumption was that he was grinding his teeth. He was very polite and ended the call. When asked about it, he says he has no recollection of this moment.

    What were the reactions to the cell phone like? Did people think it was unbelievable, impossible, unnecessary?

    Well, people were dazzled by the concept! It was beyond imagination that more than half the people in the world would have these phones. But people were absolutely amazed by the fact that you could hold the phone up to your ear, walk around and make a phone call.

    Remember, there were not even any cordless phones at that time. We had a press conference [in 1973], and I handed the phone to this young lady journalist and told her to make a phone call. And she said, Can I call my mother in Australia? and I said, Sure! And she did that.

    This woman was just spellbound, she couldn’t imagine how this little phone could reach more than halfway around the world, and talk to her mother who actually answered the phone. Sophisticated New Yorkers were standing there with their mouths open.

    The reception was quite extraordinary. The chairman of our company happened to be in Washington the time we did the next demonstration [in the early 1980s]. He visited with the vice president . [George H.W. Bush] . and showed him this new phone, and he was so taken by the phone.

    He said, Well, I have to show this to Ron. And the next thing you know he was showing it to Ronald Reagan. And Reagan asks, What’s keeping us from having this?

    What did the phone look like? How much did it cost and who actually bought it?

    The phone [was] about 10 or 11 inches high, about 1 1/2 inches across, and about 4 inches deep. It weighed about 2 1/2 pounds.

    How much did it cost?

    If you think about it, this is not a commercial product and if you had to build one it would cost about a million dollars. By the time we built a commercial product, it was 10 years later. We didn’t sell that product until October of 1983, and the phone then cost $3,900. So that would be like buying a phone today for $10,000.

    That’s quite a lot of money. Who actually bought these phones?

    Well, I wouldn’t say it was large number of people; in fact it was a very small number. In the beginning it was wealthy people, but also people who had to be on the move. It was for people like real estate agents and doctors, who were already more accustomed to technology because they were using pagers.

    Cell phones didn’t really get to be a big deal til about another seven or eight years later. Everybody thinks that the cell phone has always been here and that it’s always been popular, but it wasn’t until 1990 — before there were as few as a million cell phones in the world — that’s where it started to really explode.

    Did you ever think the phone would ever be available to everyone?

    Well, we knew that someday everybody would have a [cell] phone, but it was hard to imagine that that would happen in my lifetime. And now we’ve got almost five billion phones in the world. Wow.

    How do you feel about the advancements cell phones have made, especially with features like apps and cameras, etc.?

    I must tell you as much as we were dreamers, we never imagined that all these things could be combined into one, and I’m really not so sure that it’s a great thing. Phones have gotten so complicated, so hard to use, that you wonder if this is designed for real people or for engineers.

    I think what’s really going to happen is we’re going to have a lot of different kinds of phones when our industry grows up — some that are just plain, simple telephones. In fact, my wife and I started a company, and she designed the Jitterbug, which is just a simple telephone.

    What kind of phone do you have now?

    I’m sitting here looking at all of my phones. I’m talking to you on a phone I’m trying out for a company in Europe. It’s called the Vertu, and this phone starts at $5,000. And that’s for the very cheap model. You could buy a solid-gold version of this phone.

    So this phone, even with inflation, costs about half as much as your first cell phone.

    Yep, and really this phone is not a really complicated phone. It does have a phonebook in it, it does reach certain parts of the Web, but it’s not a PDA. You can’t read e-mail on it; it doesn’t have a camera on it. It really is a basic telephone.

    I also have a Droid. I got a Motorola Droid that I use. I also have a Jitterbug. I’m always trying whatever the latest telephone is. I had an iPhone for a while, I gave that to my grandson. Kids are really caught up in that. But I think that the Android phones are catching up now, and the latest version of the Android phones are every bit as good, if not better, than the iPhone.

    Cell phone on Cell phone on Cell phone on Cell phone on Cell phone on Cell phone on



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    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use, EWG, cell phone on.

    #Cell #phone #on



    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

    Cell phone on

    Cell phone on

    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

    Support EWG

    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

    Cell phone onBack in 1996, when the Federal Communications Commission set a legal maximum on cell phone radiation, Motorola was touting its tiny $2,000 StarTac, the first clamshell phone and an early adopter of — texting!

    Sixteen years later, cell phones — with 6 billion subscriptions worldwide and counting — have revolutionized how we communicate. The technology that powers them has changed just as dramatically. Today s smartphones vibrate, rock out, show high-def movies, make photos and videos, issue voice commands, check email, go underwater, navigate with global positioning systems and surf the web in 3-D. They sport dual core processors and batteries that let you or your kid — talk for close to 20 hours. (The StarTac maxed out at just 3 hours.)

    Cell phone onYet those 16-year-old FCC rules still stand. Are they up to the job of protecting the public from radiation coming out of those multi-tasking marvels and the networks that enable them?

    Studies conducted by numerous scientific teams in several nations have raised troubling questions about possible associations between heavy cell phone use and serious health dangers. The World Health Organization has declared that cell phone radiation may be linked to brain cancer. Ten studies connect cell phone radiation to diminished sperm count and sperm damage. Others raise health concerns such as altered brain metabolism, sleep disturbance and behavioral changes in children.

    These studies are not definitive. Much more research is needed. But they raise serious questions that cast doubt on the adequacy of the FCC rules to safeguard public health. The FCC emissions cap allows 20 times more radiation to reach the head than the body as a whole, does not account for risks to children s developing brains and smaller bodies and considers only short-term cell phone use, not frequent calling patterns over decades.

    The FCC s safety standards for cell phone radiation were based on studies conducted in the 1980s, These studies have long since been rendered obsolete by newer research. Yet for years the FCC refused to update or even review its standards. Instead, the federal agency simply sat on its hands while cell phones became ever more powerful and ubiquitous.

    The agency is finally moving to meet the realities of the 21st century and the Information Age. On June 15, FCC chairman Julius Genachowski circulated a proposal to his four fellow commissioners calling for formal review of the 1996 regulations. To advance, his plan must be approved by a majority of the commissioners. If they agree, the FCC could take the long overdue step of modernizing its safety standards. But the pace is likely to be glacial.

    Consumers need — now more than ever — real-world, relevant data on how much radiation their phones emit under various circumstances. The FCC does not require the cell phone industry to disclose these data. One important study showing that certain networks could expose consumers to 30 to 300 times more radiation than other networks was hidden from the public until the information was dated to the point of irrelevancy.

    Given this appalling lack of information in the face of a cell phone market where just about anything goes,

    the Environmental Working Group is suspending publication of the EWG guide to cell phones until the FCC makes the responsible decision to require cell phone makers to generate and disclose data about device and network emissions under real-world conditions. We strongly believe that as cell phones become more powerful and ubiquitous, it is critical that people have a right to know how much radiation they can expect their cell phones to generate. As things now stand, the FCC s cell phone safety rules are as obsolete as the StarTac.

    In the meantime, EWG recommends that consumers take steps to reduce their exposures to cell phone radiation by holding phones away from their bodies, using earpieces and following and other simple tips in EWG s updated Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use.



    Categories
    News

    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use, EWG, cell phone on.

    #Cell #phone #on



    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

    Cell phone on

    Cell phone on

    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

    Support EWG

    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

    Cell phone onBack in 1996, when the Federal Communications Commission set a legal maximum on cell phone radiation, Motorola was touting its tiny $2,000 StarTac, the first clamshell phone and an early adopter of — texting!

    Sixteen years later, cell phones — with 6 billion subscriptions worldwide and counting — have revolutionized how we communicate. The technology that powers them has changed just as dramatically. Today s smartphones vibrate, rock out, show high-def movies, make photos and videos, issue voice commands, check email, go underwater, navigate with global positioning systems and surf the web in 3-D. They sport dual core processors and batteries that let you or your kid — talk for close to 20 hours. (The StarTac maxed out at just 3 hours.)

    Cell phone onYet those 16-year-old FCC rules still stand. Are they up to the job of protecting the public from radiation coming out of those multi-tasking marvels and the networks that enable them?

    Studies conducted by numerous scientific teams in several nations have raised troubling questions about possible associations between heavy cell phone use and serious health dangers. The World Health Organization has declared that cell phone radiation may be linked to brain cancer. Ten studies connect cell phone radiation to diminished sperm count and sperm damage. Others raise health concerns such as altered brain metabolism, sleep disturbance and behavioral changes in children.

    These studies are not definitive. Much more research is needed. But they raise serious questions that cast doubt on the adequacy of the FCC rules to safeguard public health. The FCC emissions cap allows 20 times more radiation to reach the head than the body as a whole, does not account for risks to children s developing brains and smaller bodies and considers only short-term cell phone use, not frequent calling patterns over decades.

    The FCC s safety standards for cell phone radiation were based on studies conducted in the 1980s, These studies have long since been rendered obsolete by newer research. Yet for years the FCC refused to update or even review its standards. Instead, the federal agency simply sat on its hands while cell phones became ever more powerful and ubiquitous.

    The agency is finally moving to meet the realities of the 21st century and the Information Age. On June 15, FCC chairman Julius Genachowski circulated a proposal to his four fellow commissioners calling for formal review of the 1996 regulations. To advance, his plan must be approved by a majority of the commissioners. If they agree, the FCC could take the long overdue step of modernizing its safety standards. But the pace is likely to be glacial.

    Consumers need — now more than ever — real-world, relevant data on how much radiation their phones emit under various circumstances. The FCC does not require the cell phone industry to disclose these data. One important study showing that certain networks could expose consumers to 30 to 300 times more radiation than other networks was hidden from the public until the information was dated to the point of irrelevancy.

    Given this appalling lack of information in the face of a cell phone market where just about anything goes,

    the Environmental Working Group is suspending publication of the EWG guide to cell phones until the FCC makes the responsible decision to require cell phone makers to generate and disclose data about device and network emissions under real-world conditions. We strongly believe that as cell phones become more powerful and ubiquitous, it is critical that people have a right to know how much radiation they can expect their cell phones to generate. As things now stand, the FCC s cell phone safety rules are as obsolete as the StarTac.

    In the meantime, EWG recommends that consumers take steps to reduce their exposures to cell phone radiation by holding phones away from their bodies, using earpieces and following and other simple tips in EWG s updated Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use.



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    Discount Cell Phone Accessories, Tablet Accessories, iPad Accessories, cell phone on.

    #Cell #phone #on



    Popular Cell Phone and Tablet Accessories at a Discount

    Cell phone on

    Samsung Galaxy S8 Otterbox Symmetry Rugged Case – Clear Crystal

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    Find the latest mobile phone accessories including cell phone cases, cell phone chargers, batteries, holsters, bluetooth headsets, phone data kits and more at a discount. Shop OEM accessories from all major brands including Blackberry Accessories, Motorola Accessories, Nokia Accessories, Samsung, HTC, LG for Verizon, AT ?>

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    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use, EWG, on the cell phone.

    #On #the #cell #phone



    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

    On the cell phone

    On the cell phone

    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

    Support EWG

    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

    On the cell phoneBack in 1996, when the Federal Communications Commission set a legal maximum on cell phone radiation, Motorola was touting its tiny $2,000 StarTac, the first clamshell phone and an early adopter of — texting!

    Sixteen years later, cell phones — with 6 billion subscriptions worldwide and counting — have revolutionized how we communicate. The technology that powers them has changed just as dramatically. Today s smartphones vibrate, rock out, show high-def movies, make photos and videos, issue voice commands, check email, go underwater, navigate with global positioning systems and surf the web in 3-D. They sport dual core processors and batteries that let you or your kid — talk for close to 20 hours. (The StarTac maxed out at just 3 hours.)

    On the cell phoneYet those 16-year-old FCC rules still stand. Are they up to the job of protecting the public from radiation coming out of those multi-tasking marvels and the networks that enable them?

    Studies conducted by numerous scientific teams in several nations have raised troubling questions about possible associations between heavy cell phone use and serious health dangers. The World Health Organization has declared that cell phone radiation may be linked to brain cancer. Ten studies connect cell phone radiation to diminished sperm count and sperm damage. Others raise health concerns such as altered brain metabolism, sleep disturbance and behavioral changes in children.

    These studies are not definitive. Much more research is needed. But they raise serious questions that cast doubt on the adequacy of the FCC rules to safeguard public health. The FCC emissions cap allows 20 times more radiation to reach the head than the body as a whole, does not account for risks to children s developing brains and smaller bodies and considers only short-term cell phone use, not frequent calling patterns over decades.

    The FCC s safety standards for cell phone radiation were based on studies conducted in the 1980s, These studies have long since been rendered obsolete by newer research. Yet for years the FCC refused to update or even review its standards. Instead, the federal agency simply sat on its hands while cell phones became ever more powerful and ubiquitous.

    The agency is finally moving to meet the realities of the 21st century and the Information Age. On June 15, FCC chairman Julius Genachowski circulated a proposal to his four fellow commissioners calling for formal review of the 1996 regulations. To advance, his plan must be approved by a majority of the commissioners. If they agree, the FCC could take the long overdue step of modernizing its safety standards. But the pace is likely to be glacial.

    Consumers need — now more than ever — real-world, relevant data on how much radiation their phones emit under various circumstances. The FCC does not require the cell phone industry to disclose these data. One important study showing that certain networks could expose consumers to 30 to 300 times more radiation than other networks was hidden from the public until the information was dated to the point of irrelevancy.

    Given this appalling lack of information in the face of a cell phone market where just about anything goes,

    the Environmental Working Group is suspending publication of the EWG guide to cell phones until the FCC makes the responsible decision to require cell phone makers to generate and disclose data about device and network emissions under real-world conditions. We strongly believe that as cell phones become more powerful and ubiquitous, it is critical that people have a right to know how much radiation they can expect their cell phones to generate. As things now stand, the FCC s cell phone safety rules are as obsolete as the StarTac.

    In the meantime, EWG recommends that consumers take steps to reduce their exposures to cell phone radiation by holding phones away from their bodies, using earpieces and following and other simple tips in EWG s updated Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use.



    Categories
    News

    Cell Phone Directory, Cell Phone Reverse Lookup, Cell Phone Registry, on the cell phone.

    #On #the #cell #phone



    on the cell phone

    On the cell phone

    Welcome to the National Registry of Cellular Numbers

    NRCN is the leading cell phone directory and provider of online cell phone lookups. Our powerful cell phone directory tool searches the largest database of Landline, Mobile and Unlisted Phone Numbers to bring you the most up-to-date and accurate data. Please use the form below to lookup cell phone numbers instantly.

    On the cell phone

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    Report May Include: Full Name and Full Address associated with the number, Cell Phone or Phone Carrier information, Date of Birth, Phone Numbers, Dates of Issuance.

    On the cell phoneAddress

    On the cell phoneBackground Checks

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    On the cell phoneMarriage Records

    On the cell phoneCriminal Records

    On the cell phoneMarriage/Divorce Records

    On the cell phoneBirth Records

    On the cell phoneDeath Records

    On the cell phoneProperty Records

    On the cell phoneAsset Information

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    On the cell phone

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    Copyright 2008 – 2017 CellphoneRegistry.org. All Rights Reserved.

    Unauthorized duplication, distribution, or copying in any way is prohibited by law and will be prosecuted.

    This website is not affiliated with the United States Government or any Federal or State government agency.

    By using this site, cell phone directory and reverse cell phone lookup, you certify that you will use any information obtained for lawfully acceptable purposes. Please be advised that it is against the law to use the information obtained from this site to stalk or harass others. Search requests on public officials, juveniles, and/or celebrities are strictly prohibited. Users who request information under false pretenses or use data obtained from this site in contravention of the law may be subject to civil criminal penalties. All searches are subject to terms of use and applicable law. Information contained herein is derived from records that may have errors and/or not always be accurate or complete.



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    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use, EWG, on the cell phone.

    #On #the #cell #phone



    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

    On the cell phone

    On the cell phone

    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

    Support EWG

    EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

    On the cell phoneBack in 1996, when the Federal Communications Commission set a legal maximum on cell phone radiation, Motorola was touting its tiny $2,000 StarTac, the first clamshell phone and an early adopter of — texting!

    Sixteen years later, cell phones — with 6 billion subscriptions worldwide and counting — have revolutionized how we communicate. The technology that powers them has changed just as dramatically. Today s smartphones vibrate, rock out, show high-def movies, make photos and videos, issue voice commands, check email, go underwater, navigate with global positioning systems and surf the web in 3-D. They sport dual core processors and batteries that let you or your kid — talk for close to 20 hours. (The StarTac maxed out at just 3 hours.)

    On the cell phoneYet those 16-year-old FCC rules still stand. Are they up to the job of protecting the public from radiation coming out of those multi-tasking marvels and the networks that enable them?

    Studies conducted by numerous scientific teams in several nations have raised troubling questions about possible associations between heavy cell phone use and serious health dangers. The World Health Organization has declared that cell phone radiation may be linked to brain cancer. Ten studies connect cell phone radiation to diminished sperm count and sperm damage. Others raise health concerns such as altered brain metabolism, sleep disturbance and behavioral changes in children.

    These studies are not definitive. Much more research is needed. But they raise serious questions that cast doubt on the adequacy of the FCC rules to safeguard public health. The FCC emissions cap allows 20 times more radiation to reach the head than the body as a whole, does not account for risks to children s developing brains and smaller bodies and considers only short-term cell phone use, not frequent calling patterns over decades.

    The FCC s safety standards for cell phone radiation were based on studies conducted in the 1980s, These studies have long since been rendered obsolete by newer research. Yet for years the FCC refused to update or even review its standards. Instead, the federal agency simply sat on its hands while cell phones became ever more powerful and ubiquitous.

    The agency is finally moving to meet the realities of the 21st century and the Information Age. On June 15, FCC chairman Julius Genachowski circulated a proposal to his four fellow commissioners calling for formal review of the 1996 regulations. To advance, his plan must be approved by a majority of the commissioners. If they agree, the FCC could take the long overdue step of modernizing its safety standards. But the pace is likely to be glacial.

    Consumers need — now more than ever — real-world, relevant data on how much radiation their phones emit under various circumstances. The FCC does not require the cell phone industry to disclose these data. One important study showing that certain networks could expose consumers to 30 to 300 times more radiation than other networks was hidden from the public until the information was dated to the point of irrelevancy.

    Given this appalling lack of information in the face of a cell phone market where just about anything goes,

    the Environmental Working Group is suspending publication of the EWG guide to cell phones until the FCC makes the responsible decision to require cell phone makers to generate and disclose data about device and network emissions under real-world conditions. We strongly believe that as cell phones become more powerful and ubiquitous, it is critical that people have a right to know how much radiation they can expect their cell phones to generate. As things now stand, the FCC s cell phone safety rules are as obsolete as the StarTac.

    In the meantime, EWG recommends that consumers take steps to reduce their exposures to cell phone radiation by holding phones away from their bodies, using earpieces and following and other simple tips in EWG s updated Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use.



    Categories
    News

    Medicaid Cell Phone – Medicaid Cell Phone, on the cell phone.

    #On #the #cell #phone



    Medicaid Cell Phone Program

    This program was created in the 1980 s to make sure that low income families and individuals had access to a phone for basic communication.

    Medicaid recipients can easily get their FREE Medicaid cell phone with 250 FREE monthly minutes through any government-approved Lifeline provider. Federal regulations allow only one cell phone per household.

    You can apply for your FREE cell phone right now by submitting your email address and zip code below.

    To qualify for your Medicaid cell phone with monthly minutes, you must participate in a government assistance program such as Medicaid, Food Stamps (SNAP), Social Security Income (SSI) and most other government assistance programs. Criteria for the Free cell phone varies by state.

    If you participate in Medicaid then you can claim your FREE cell phone in minutes! Don’t wait, apply for your Medicaid free cell phone and get connected to emergency services, doctors, family and friends today.

    FROM THE BLOG On the cell phoneRSS Feed | Visit our blog

    • On the cell phoneMedicaid Cell Phone Program

    It is possible to get a Medicaid cell phone. The Link Up and Lifeline programs have teamed up to provide Medicaid cell phones to qualifying

  • On the cell phoneHow to Qualify for Medicaid

    In order to qualify for Medicaid, applicants must first fit into a certain category. These categories include children, parents of eligible children, pregnant women, and

  • On the cell phoneWhat is Medicaid?

    Medicaid is a health program that is funded by the federal government but administered by the state, so each state may have its own particular

    Success Stories

    Shelly Peck (Little Rock, AR)

    On the cell phone“This program was such a big help. With my free phone I was able to keep in touch with my family and friends and schedule doctor appointments”

    Jim Mathers (Norman, OK)

    On the cell phone“I felt safer with my Lifeline phone knowing I could call someone if something happened to me. It was great for calling my grandchildren too!”

    Violet Johnson (Cleveland, OH)

    On the cell phone“After I got laid off, we had to cut our cell phone service to save money. Thanks to my free Lifeline phone I was able to schedule interviews and get back in the job market.”



  • Categories
    News

    Arizona on & Video

    #Everybody #rowing #the #same #way



    Arizona on

    *******

    ‘Everybody rowing the same way.’ Ducks cruise past Arizona on ‘best night of the season’

    Oregon’s Kenny Wooten gestures to the crowd at the end of the Ducks’ Pac-12 college basketball game against Arizona on Saturday, March 2, 2019, in Eugene. (AP Photo/Chris Pietsch)

    EUGENE — For the second game in a row, Oregon found a way to exceed coach Dana Altman’s defensive expectations during the second half.

    The next challenge will be to bottle that intensity to take on the road.

    Two nights after holding Arizona State, the Pac-12’s top scoring team, to a season-low 51 points, the Ducks put the clamps on Arizona.

    Freshman Louis King scored 14 points and Oregon used two 12-0 runs in the second half to dominate the Wildcats 73-47 on Saturday night.

    “Tonight was our best night of the season, even better than Thursday,” Altman said. “There was really a connection with all the guys.”

    Payton Pritchard and Will Richardson added 12 points each and Francis Okoro had 10 for the Ducks (17-12, 8-8 Pac-12), who outscored Arizona 42-16 in the second half after being tied at the break.

    Oregon held the Wildcats (17-13, 8-9) to 19.2 percent shooting in the second half, including 1 of 12 from three-point range. Meanwhile, the Ducks shot 57.7 percent after halftime and matched Arizona’s 36 rebounds, led by King and Okoro with seven each.

    “I thought it was our best,” Altman said. “Everybody in the boat and everybody rowing the same way, and I thought they did a good job.”

    Dylan Smith led the Wildcats with 14 points, all in the first half, and Brandon Williams had 12 off the bench. The loss was Arizona’s sixth in its past eight meetings with Oregon and came within a point of its 85-58 drubbing in Eugene two years ago.

    Altman recited from memory the exact point totals the Ducks allowed in the second halves of their three recent road losses, capped by the 62 they surrendered at UCLA after leading big in the first half.

    The difference at home against the Arizona schools came down to better communication.

    “It was talking, just being focused,” senior Paul White said. “One of the things that we lack sometimes is we lose focus and make mistakes, and other teams capitalize on them. We’ve kind of cut down on our mistakes, so it just makes it harder for teams to score on us.”

    The Wildcats shot 31.3 percent overall, their third-worst performance of the season, and saw their 15 turnovers lead to 15 points for the Ducks. The 47 points also were the fewest for Arizona in coach Sean Miller’s 10 seasons in Tucson.

    “They just played harder than us,” said the freshman Williams. “I’ve got to give them credit. They were the better team, they were the stronger and more physical team, so we’ve just got to be ready next time.”

    In a first half of scoring runs by both teams, Arizona survived a 12-1 gap in turnovers and only two points from posts Ira Lee and Chase Jeter to go to the locker room even at 31-31. The Wildcats scored the game’s first nine points but fell behind by 11 after 13 minutes at 25-14, only to ride a 17-3 burst to regain the lead.

    Arizona missed its first sweep of the Oregon trip since 2009 and slid all the way to 10th in the Pac-12 standings with one game to play before the conference tournament. It also snapped the Wildcats’ three-game win streak.

    Oregon is one game out of fourth place and a possible bye in the Pac-12 tournament with two road games to go. The Ducks are tied for sixth with Stanford, USC and Colorado.

    STAT OF THE NIGHT

    Oregon committed three turnovers, its fewest in two seasons, and received 27 points from its bench. The Ducks went nine deep and all scored at least four points before Altman subbed in two walk-ons in the final minute.

    Arizona had closed within 47-40 before Okoro bulled his way inside for consecutive baskets against Ryan Luther, who was playing with four fouls after picking up a technical earlier in the second half that helped ignite one of Oregon’s 12-0 runs.

    Arizona: Plays host to Arizona State next Saturday.

    Oregon: At Washington State on Wednesday night.


    *******
    SOURCE: http://www.oregonlive.com/ducks/2019/03/everybody-rowing-the-same-way-ducks-cruise-past-arizona-on-best-night-of-the-season.html

    Categories
    News

    Inventor of cell phone: We knew someday everybody would have one, on the cell phone.

    #On #the #cell #phone



    Inventor of cell phone: We knew someday everybody would have one

    On the cell phone

    • In 1973, Martin Cooper and his team at Motorola built, demonstrated first cell phone
    • Cooper says that first phone cost $3,900, plus 50 cents a minute to talk
    • Cooper: We knew that someday everybody would have a [cell] phone
    • Today he has several cell phones — but not an iPhone, which he gave away

    (CNN) — In 1973, Martin Cooper changed the world, although he didn’t know it yet.

    Cooper and his team at Motorola, the communications company, created maybe the only thing that runs the lives of business professionals and teenagers alike — the cell phone.

    It was the size of a brick and wasn’t commercially sold for another decade. But as Cooper demonstrated on a New York sidewalk, it worked.

    The concept of cellular technology had already been created by Motorola’s rival, AT T, whose Bell Labs introduced a system allowing calls to be moved from one cell to another while remaining on the same channel. But AT T was focusing this technology on the car phone.

    Cooper wanted people to have freedom to talk on the phone away from their cars. So in reaction, he and Motorola embarked on a project to create a more portable device.

    Motorola spent three months building a prototype for a portable, mobile handset that Cooper publicly demonstrated in April of 1973. The company’s first commercial cellular phone, the DynaTAC, went on sale 10 years later.

    Cooper, now 81, is founder of ArrayComm, a company working to improve cellular networks, smart antenna and wireless communication. He and his wife are also inventors of the Jitterbug, a simplified cell phone geared to senior citizens.

    On the cell phone

    Cooper was surprised when his landline dropped our call. After calling him back on his mobile, we had a chance to ask him about the creation of the device that changed the face of communication as we know it.

    Here is an edited transcript of our conversation:

    CNN: What was the technology climate like back in 1973, and what gave you the idea to move with the cell phone and compete with AT T’s car phone?

    Cooper: There were no large-scale integrated circuits, no computers, no closed-circuit televisions, no LCD screens — I can’t tell you all the things that did not exist in 1973. But, we’d been building phones for years and years in cars, and we [Motorola] thought the time was ready for personal communication, ’cause people are just naturally mobile.

    For 100 years, people wanting to talk on the phone have been constrained by being tied to their desks or their homes with a wire, and now we’re going to trap them in their cars? That’s not good.

    So we decided to take on AT T. By 1973, we decided to put on a dazzling presentation, and I decided the best way to do that was to build a phone and have someone actually have the experience of talking on a real personal handheld telephone. And that was the genesis of that phone that we built.

    When did you make that first phone call? Who was it to?

    I thought everybody knew the answer to that question! The first public call was made out on the streets of New York. It was to [Joel S. Engel], the head of the cellular program at AT T. I called and told him, Joel, I’m calling you from a cellular phone, a real cellular phone, a handheld, portable, real cellular phone.

    I don’t remember exactly what he said, but it was really quiet for a while. My assumption was that he was grinding his teeth. He was very polite and ended the call. When asked about it, he says he has no recollection of this moment.

    What were the reactions to the cell phone like? Did people think it was unbelievable, impossible, unnecessary?

    Well, people were dazzled by the concept! It was beyond imagination that more than half the people in the world would have these phones. But people were absolutely amazed by the fact that you could hold the phone up to your ear, walk around and make a phone call.

    Remember, there were not even any cordless phones at that time. We had a press conference [in 1973], and I handed the phone to this young lady journalist and told her to make a phone call. And she said, Can I call my mother in Australia? and I said, Sure! And she did that.

    This woman was just spellbound, she couldn’t imagine how this little phone could reach more than halfway around the world, and talk to her mother who actually answered the phone. Sophisticated New Yorkers were standing there with their mouths open.

    The reception was quite extraordinary. The chairman of our company happened to be in Washington the time we did the next demonstration [in the early 1980s]. He visited with the vice president . [George H.W. Bush] . and showed him this new phone, and he was so taken by the phone.

    He said, Well, I have to show this to Ron. And the next thing you know he was showing it to Ronald Reagan. And Reagan asks, What’s keeping us from having this?

    What did the phone look like? How much did it cost and who actually bought it?

    The phone [was] about 10 or 11 inches high, about 1 1/2 inches across, and about 4 inches deep. It weighed about 2 1/2 pounds.

    How much did it cost?

    If you think about it, this is not a commercial product and if you had to build one it would cost about a million dollars. By the time we built a commercial product, it was 10 years later. We didn’t sell that product until October of 1983, and the phone then cost $3,900. So that would be like buying a phone today for $10,000.

    That’s quite a lot of money. Who actually bought these phones?

    Well, I wouldn’t say it was large number of people; in fact it was a very small number. In the beginning it was wealthy people, but also people who had to be on the move. It was for people like real estate agents and doctors, who were already more accustomed to technology because they were using pagers.

    Cell phones didn’t really get to be a big deal til about another seven or eight years later. Everybody thinks that the cell phone has always been here and that it’s always been popular, but it wasn’t until 1990 — before there were as few as a million cell phones in the world — that’s where it started to really explode.

    Did you ever think the phone would ever be available to everyone?

    Well, we knew that someday everybody would have a [cell] phone, but it was hard to imagine that that would happen in my lifetime. And now we’ve got almost five billion phones in the world. Wow.

    How do you feel about the advancements cell phones have made, especially with features like apps and cameras, etc.?

    I must tell you as much as we were dreamers, we never imagined that all these things could be combined into one, and I’m really not so sure that it’s a great thing. Phones have gotten so complicated, so hard to use, that you wonder if this is designed for real people or for engineers.

    I think what’s really going to happen is we’re going to have a lot of different kinds of phones when our industry grows up — some that are just plain, simple telephones. In fact, my wife and I started a company, and she designed the Jitterbug, which is just a simple telephone.

    What kind of phone do you have now?

    I’m sitting here looking at all of my phones. I’m talking to you on a phone I’m trying out for a company in Europe. It’s called the Vertu, and this phone starts at $5,000. And that’s for the very cheap model. You could buy a solid-gold version of this phone.

    So this phone, even with inflation, costs about half as much as your first cell phone.

    Yep, and really this phone is not a really complicated phone. It does have a phonebook in it, it does reach certain parts of the Web, but it’s not a PDA. You can’t read e-mail on it; it doesn’t have a camera on it. It really is a basic telephone.

    I also have a Droid. I got a Motorola Droid that I use. I also have a Jitterbug. I’m always trying whatever the latest telephone is. I had an iPhone for a while, I gave that to my grandson. Kids are really caught up in that. But I think that the Android phones are catching up now, and the latest version of the Android phones are every bit as good, if not better, than the iPhone.

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    Free Government Cell Phone Plan – Service – Free Government Phones, on the cell phone.

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    Free Government Cell Phone Service

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    Get up to 500 anytime minutes per month and pay nothing .

    Apply now for your free cellular plan and free cell phone and receive your handset in just a few days.

    Easy Application

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    It s simple to apply on-line for this Lifeline subsidized plan. Just click on your state above. Your state’s page will have an details of the wireless plan available to you and a link to the on-line ordering process.

    Read the qualification requirements, fill out the form, then submit. Your order will be processsed as soon as we get your order and any required proof of qualifications documents. Your free mobile phone will be on it s way to you, ready to use with Lifeline wireless plan minutes. You should receive your new handset in just a few days.

    You ll never receive a bill and your minutes will replenish every month. If you need more minutes you may purchase them at a reduced rate.

    Do I Qualify for a Free Government Mobile Plan?

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    Free government phone service is made possible by the Lifeline program. Lifeline is a Federal program that gives you a discount on basic telephone plans because it is subsidized by the government, making it more affordable for low income families. That Lifeline discount provides the free minutes for you to use each month. Those that are currently enrolled in a government assistance program like Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Medicaid, SSI, National School Lunch Free Lunch Program, etc. are qualified for Lifeline. You can also qualify based on your household income.

    Expert Cellular is the place for a Free Government Phone plan.

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    No Contract

    A cellphone can be a life saver. Make sure your family has the security that mobile service can provide.

    Free Long Distance – Your free wireless plan includes long distance calling. Eliminate those long distance charges from your home phone bill!

    You can get the peace of mind knowing your loved ones are safe and secure by just calling them. Now you can have a mobile phone that will keep you in touch with those you care about. Don’t wait any longer. Fill out your application today. Start by clicking on your state.

    Being available to those that need you can make a difference. Don’t miss that important call from your childs school, from your employer, or about that job interview.



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    Assurance Wireless, Get a Free Cell Phone up to 250 Min, on the cell phone.

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    Assurance Wireless

    If you reached our Assurance Wireless page from a search, we recommend first reading our free government cell phone main page for helpful general information before reading this article.

    Assurance Wireless is one of the largest and fastest growing Lifeline Assistance cell phone carriers operating in the United States. Assurance Wireless provides eligible customers with a (1) Free Cell Phone; (2) 250 FREE Voice Minutes; and (3) UNLIMITED FREE Texts each and every month. These are added automatically with no cost to you. However, if you want to go beyond the basics, you can by adding amounts as low as $5/month to get additional services, like more texts or more minutes.

    They also have unlimited cell phone plans available for very reasonable prices. To top it off, you can buy Virgin Mobile Top-Up cards from thousands of retail locations across the country as well as online with a credit card or even PayPal.

    Even if you do not purchase additional minutes, Assurance Wireless (and Virgin Mobile) is still compensated by the government that pays subsidies to them to cover the cost of the cell phone and monthly cell service fees. If you are struggling to pay your bills, this is something than can really help you.

    So, if you were suspicious about why Assurance Wireless would give out free cell phones and minutes, you now know. They receive $10 per subscriber from the government s Universal Service Fund and YOU get a free cell phone and monthly minutes at no charge.

    Get a Free Government Cell Phone From Assurance Wireless

    The process of getting a free government cell phone is simple and straightforward. First, you need to see if Assurance Wireless provides service in your state. If your state is not listed below, don t fret! Assurance Wireless is quickly rolling our service to new states. Please visit this page again as we regularly update the content on this website.

    In the mean time, there may be other free government cell phone providers that offer service in your state. In this case, we recommend visiting our other pages for free government cell phone carriers to determine if they provide service in your state. You can find links to numerous free cell phone carriers to the left of this article.

    Next, you should review the eligibility requirements for your particular state. After this, if you think you are eligible, you simply fill out an application with supporting documentation and you will quickly find out if you can get a free cell phone from Assurance Wireless.

    Assurance Wireless Eligibility Requirements

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    Assurance Wireless Offers Free Cell Phones to Eligible Customers

    Eligibility requirements for the Assurance Wireless program can vary from state to state. Consequently, we strongly recommend checking your state of residence s specific eligibility requirements before applying to Assurance Wireless. That being said, in general if you already receive government assistance, such as Food Stamps, Section 8, Social Security, Medicaid, etc, then there is a good chance you qualify for the Assurance Wireless program. Please check your state s list of eligible government assistance programs to see if you qualify for Assurance Wireless.

    Even if you don t currently participate in an eligible government assistance program, you may still be able to qualify for Assurance Wireless service under income eligibility guidelines. Not all states allow applicants to qualify for service under income guidelines. However, those that do require an applicant s total household income to be at or below 100-150% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines. The majority of states that allow an applicant to qualify under income guidelines require that an applicant s total household income is at or below 135% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines. We have listed these values in the table below for your convenience.



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    Cell Phone Reviews, Cell Phones Review, on the cell phone.

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    Cell Phones Reviews

    Top Phones on Every Carrier

    We test and rate hundreds of mobile phones each year. These are the 10 best you can get right now.

    Fastest Mobile Networks

    Before buying your next phone, find out which carrier has the fastest data network near you.

    The Best Android Phones

    The greatest thing about Google’s mobile OS: Your choice of handsets on all the major wireless carriers.

    Top Picks: Phones for Kids

    Trust us, your kid wants a phone. But which one is best? Check out our recommendations.

    Price
    Brand
    Service Provider
    Operating System as Tested
    Form Factor
    Phone Capability / Network
    Editors Ratings
    Awards

    Samsung Galaxy S8 Active Review

    Bottom Line: The Samsung Galaxy S8 Active takes the best phone of the year, makes it tougher, and packs in a bigger battery. It’s the ultimate rugged phone—but it’s only available on AT ?>

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    Discount Cell Phone Accessories, Tablet Accessories, iPad Accessories, on the cell phone.

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    Popular Cell Phone and Tablet Accessories at a Discount

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    Samsung Galaxy S8 Otterbox Symmetry Rugged Case – Clear Crystal

    List Price: $39.95

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    Apple MacBook Air 13 inch STM dux for MacBook Air 13

    List Price: $59.99

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    Apple iPad Pro 9.7 Naztech MFI Lightning Charge and Sync USB Braided 4ft Cable – Black

    List Price: $29.99

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    Samsung Galaxy S7 Special Buy – UMA 2.8Amp Premium USB Car Charger with Extra USB Port

    List Price: $29.99

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    Apple iPhone 7 Plus Body Glove Satin Case – Paradise Pink

    List Price: $24.99

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    Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge Otterbox Strada Leather Folio Protective Case – Ruby Romance Red

    List Price: $49.95

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    Apple iPhone 7 Plus Otterbox Symmetry Rugged Case – Black Crystal

    List Price: $49.95

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    Samsung Galaxy S8 Plus HyperGear Flexi USB-C Charge and Sync Flat 6 Foot Cable – White

    List Price: $16.99

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    Samsung Galaxy S8 Nite Ize Clip Case Executive – Black

    List Price: $22.19

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    Apple iPad Mini 4 Otterbox Symmetry Series Tablet Folio – Merlot Shadow

    List Price: $59.95

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    Apple iPhone 7 Otterbox uniVERSE Rugged Case – Black

    List Price: $49.95

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    Apple iPhone 7 Puregear Express Folio Wallet Case With Card Holder – Black And Gray

    List Price: $39.99

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    Samsung Galaxy S8 Naztech Roadstar 5 USB 12A Car Charger and Hub – Black

    List Price: $39.99

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    Samsung Galaxy S7 Otterbox Defender Rugged Interactive Case and Holster – Steel Berry Blue and Gray

    List Price: $49.95

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    Samsung Galaxy S8 Puregear Softtek Case – Blue Stripe

    List Price: $34.99

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    Apple iPad Mini 4 OtterBox Utility Series Latch II with Accessory Pack – Black and Black

    List Price: $39.99

    Find the latest mobile phone accessories including cell phone cases, cell phone chargers, batteries, holsters, bluetooth headsets, phone data kits and more at a discount. Shop OEM accessories from all major brands including Blackberry Accessories, Motorola Accessories, Nokia Accessories, Samsung, HTC, LG for Verizon, AT ?>

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    Cell Phone Directory, Cell Phone Reverse Lookup, Cell Phone Registry, on the cell phone.

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    Welcome to the National Registry of Cellular Numbers

    NRCN is the leading cell phone directory and provider of online cell phone lookups. Our powerful cell phone directory tool searches the largest database of Landline, Mobile and Unlisted Phone Numbers to bring you the most up-to-date and accurate data. Please use the form below to lookup cell phone numbers instantly.

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    Report May Include: Full Name and Full Address associated with the number, Cell Phone or Phone Carrier information, Date of Birth, Phone Numbers, Dates of Issuance.

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    Copyright 2008 – 2017 CellphoneRegistry.org. All Rights Reserved.

    Unauthorized duplication, distribution, or copying in any way is prohibited by law and will be prosecuted.

    This website is not affiliated with the United States Government or any Federal or State government agency.

    By using this site, cell phone directory and reverse cell phone lookup, you certify that you will use any information obtained for lawfully acceptable purposes. Please be advised that it is against the law to use the information obtained from this site to stalk or harass others. Search requests on public officials, juveniles, and/or celebrities are strictly prohibited. Users who request information under false pretenses or use data obtained from this site in contravention of the law may be subject to civil criminal penalties. All searches are subject to terms of use and applicable law. Information contained herein is derived from records that may have errors and/or not always be accurate or complete.