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Mobile Access 2010, Pew Research Center, about the mobile phone.

#About #the #mobile #phone



Mobile Access 2010

Six in ten American adults are now wireless internet users, and mobile data applications have grown more popular over the last year.

As of May 2010, 59% of all adult Americans go online wirelessly. Our definition of a wireless internet user includes the following activities:

  • Going online with a laptop using a wi-fi connection or mobile broadband card. Roughly half of all adults (47%) go online in this way, up from the 39% who did so at a similar point in 2009.
  • Use the internet, email or instant messaging on a cell phone. Two in five adults (40%) do at least one of these using a mobile device, an increase from the 32% of adults who did so in 2009.

Taken together, 59% of American adults now go online wirelessly using either a laptop or cell phone, an increase over the 51% of Americans who did so at a similar point in 2009.[1]

Cell phone ownership has remained stable over the last year, but users are taking advantage of a much wider range of their phones capabilities compared with a similar point in 2009. Of the eight mobile data applications we asked about in both 2009 and 2010, all showed statistically significant year-to-year growth.

About the mobile phone About the mobile phone

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Where is arizona on the us map \ Video

#Arizona, #Geography, #Facts, #Map, #& #History



Where is arizona on the us map

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  • 1 Excluding military abroad.

Arizona, constituent state of the United States of America. Arizona is the sixth largest state in the country in terms of area. Its population has always been predominantly urban, particularly since the mid-20th century, when urban and suburban areas began growing rapidly at the expense of the countryside. Some scholars believe that the state’s name comes from a Basque phrase meaning “place of oaks,” while others attribute it to a Tohono O’odham (Papago) Indian phrase meaning “place of the young (or little) spring.” Arizona achieved statehood on February 14, 1912, the last of the 48 conterminous United States to be admitted to the union.

Arizona is a land of contradictions. Although widely reputed for its hot low-elevation desert covered with cacti and creosote bushes, more than half of the state lies at an elevation of at least 4,000 feet (1,200 metres) above sea level, and it possesses the largest stand of evergreen ponderosa pine trees in the world. Arizona is well known for its waterless tracts of desert, but, thanks to many large man-made lakes, it has many more miles of shoreline than its reputation might suggest. Such spectacular landforms as the Grand Canyon and the Painted Desert have become international symbols of the region’s ruggedness, yet Arizona’s environment is so delicate that in many ways it is more threatened by pollution than are New York City and Los Angeles. Its romantic reputation as a wild desert and a place of old-fashioned close-to-the-earth simplicity is at variance with the fact that after the 1860s the state’s economy became industrial and technological long before it was pastoral or agrarian.

Arizona is located in the southwestern quadrant of the conterminous states, bordered by California to the west, Nevada to the northwest, Utah to the north, New Mexico to the east, and the Mexican state of Sonora to the south. The Colorado River forms the boundary with California and Nevada. Phoenix, situated in the south-central part of the state, is the capital and largest city. Area 113,990 square miles (295,233 square km). Population (2010) 6,392,017; (2018 est.) 7,171,646.

Plate tectonics—the shifting of large, relatively thin segments of Earth’s crust—and stream erosion have done the most to create Arizona’s spectacular topography. Specifically, the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate came into contact and created the major tectonic forces that uplifted, wrinkled, and stretched Arizona’s geologic crust, forming its mountain ranges, basins, and high plateaus. Over the course of millennia, rivers and their tributaries have carved distinctive landforms on these surfaces.

To Arizona’s two major physiographic divisions, the Colorado Plateau and the Basin and Range Province, geologists add the Transition Zone (or Central Highlands). The northeastern two-fifths of Arizona is part of the scenic Colorado Plateau. Far less rugged than adjacent portions of the plateau in Utah, these tablelands in Arizona consist mainly of plains interrupted by steplike escarpments. Although they are labeled mesas and plateaus, their ruggedness and inaccessibility have been exaggerated. The incomparable Grand Canyon of the Colorado River provides the major exception to what has proved to be an area easily traversed. Forest-clad volcanic mountains atop the plateaus provide the state’s highest points: Humphreys Peak, 12,633 feet (3,851 metres), in the San Francisco Mountains, and Baldy Mountain, 11,403 feet (3,476 metres), in the White Mountains.

More than 200 miles (320 km) of the southern border of the Colorado Plateau is marked by a series of giant escarpments known collectively as the Mogollon Rim. West and south of the rim, a number of streams follow narrow canyons or broad valleys south through the Transition Zone and into the Basin and Range Province. The Transition Zone bordering the plateaus comprises separated plateau blocks, rugged peaks, and isolated rolling uplands so forbidding that they remained mostly unexplored until the late 19th century. The zone marks the ecological border between the low deserts and the forested highlands; it combines elements of both with, for example, the Spanish bayonet of the Sonoran Desert growing alongside the juniper characteristic of higher elevations.

The Basin and Range region of the southern and western third of the state contains the bulk of the population but none of the large canyons and mesas for which Arizona is famous. It consists largely of broad, open-ended basins or valleys of gentle slope. Isolated northwest-to-southeast–tending mountain ranges rise like islands in the desert plain.

Contrary to desert stereotypes, sand dunes are nearly nonexistent, and stony desert surfaces are seldom visible except in the far southwestern portion of the state. The younger soils of river floodplains provide the more-desirable soils for agriculture.

Virtually all of Arizona lies within the Colorado River drainage system. The Gila River, with its major feeder streams—the Salt and the Verde—is by far the Colorado’s main Arizona tributary.

The Black, White, and Verde rivers are the primary perennial tributaries of the Salt River, which enters the Gila River southwest of Phoenix. Only during the infrequent—and occasionally devastating—flood periods does runoff water advance downstream past the numerous dams built on the Salt’s system. The Gila River rises in that part of the Mogollon Rim located in western New Mexico, and it includes another and smaller Mogollon Rim tributary, the San Francisco River. Two intermittent southern Arizona streams, the Santa Cruz and San Pedro rivers, flow northward into the Gila, while two other intermittent streams, the Agua Fria and Hassayampa rivers, drain central Arizona southward into the Gila. Dams and irrigation systems, except on rare occasions, leave the Gila River dry for most of its length.

The Little Colorado River—which drains the Mogollon Rim’s lee side and flows from southeast to northwest into the Colorado River between Marble Canyon and the Grand Canyon—draws and transports little water from its large watershed. Because of the rain shadow effect on the Mogollon Rim’s lee side, the Little Colorado usually is no more than a trickle and often is dry. Several other small and intermittent streams, such as the Bill Williams River, drain a large but arid part of western Arizona.

About half of Arizona is semiarid, one-third is arid, and the remainder is humid. The Basin and Range region has the arid and semiarid subtropical climate that attracts most winter visitors and new residents. January days in Phoenix receive more than four-fifths of the possible sunshine and have a mean maximum temperature of 65 °F (18 °C). Occasional light frosts occur at most locations in the Basin and Range region in winter, and some precipitation interrupts the exceedingly dry springs and mildly dry falls. Daily maximum readings average 106 °F (41 °C) in Phoenix in July, and nighttime temperatures drop to an average of 81 °F (27 °C).

Moisture-laden air from the Gulf of California and the eastern Pacific Ocean appears in July, bringing more than two months of irregular but sometimes heavy thundershowers that are locally referred to as the “summer monsoon.” Phoenix and Tucson receive about 1 inch (25 mm) of precipitation in July and about 3 inches (75 mm) total throughout the summer months. Winter rains come from the Pacific.

The Colorado Plateau has cool to cold winters and a semiarid climate. Average mile-high elevations and direct exposure to polar air masses can produce January mean high and low temperatures as divergent as the 46 °F (8 °C) and 19 °F (− 7 °C), respectively, in Winslow. Year-round temperatures in Flagstaff are generally 30 °F (17 °C) cooler than those of Phoenix. Most of the region receives from 10 to 15 inches (250 to 375 mm) of precipitation annually, with the Mogollon Rim and White Mountains receiving the state’s largest average, 25 inches (625 mm).

Because of the great diversity of relief within the Transition Zone, climatic conditions there vary widely over small areas. Much of Arizona’s humid area lies in this zone and in the adjacent high southern edge of the Colorado Plateau. There, perennial streams flowing through shaded riparian corridors contribute to atmospheric moisture, resulting in temperatures that are several degrees cooler than those of the nearby deserts.

Plant and animal life

Considering the variety in relief and climate, it is not surprising to find similar diversity in the state’s vegetation. About one-tenth of Arizona is forested, one-fourth is woodland, one-fourth is grassland, and the rest is desert shrub. Elevations above 6,000 to 7,000 feet (1,800 to 2,100 metres) host forests of ponderosa pine, topped in the highest areas by Douglas and other firs, spruces, and aspen. From 4,500 to 7,500 feet (1,375 to 2,300 metres) in the northern half of the state, piñon pine and juniper predominate, while evergreen oak and chaparral grow between 4,000 and 6,000 feet (1,400 and 1,800 metres) in the central mountains. Plains grasses cover about one-third of the Colorado Plateau, and Sonoran or desert grass carpets the higher elevations of the basins. Mesquite trees have invaded many former grasslands in the south. Cacti grow throughout the state, with the greatest variety below 2,000 feet (600 metres). Foothills in the Tucson-Phoenix area carry giant saguaro cacti of the Sonoran Desert, matched in areas of the northwest Basin and Range by dramatic stands of Joshua trees. Shrubs dominate the lowest portions of all areas: big sagebrush and saltbush in the Colorado Plateau, creosote bush in the Basin and Range.

Animal life is even more varied, with representatives of the Rocky Mountain, Great Plains, and Mexican ecological communities. Important larger mammals are black bears, deer, desert bighorns, antelope, and wapiti (elk). The tropical coatimundi, a raccoonlike mammal, has spread northward into Arizona, while the javelina, or peccary (wild pig), is a favourite game animal in the south. Among the several cats, the bobcat and the mountain lion (puma) are most characteristic of Arizona. Coyotes, skunks, and porcupines abound, as do cottontails, jackrabbits, and several varieties of foxes. The state’s southern border area lies along a major flyway and is rich in birdlife, which attracts thousands of watchers. Game birds include turkeys and a variety of quails, doves, and waterfowl. Among native fish are the Arizona trout and the Colorado squawfish. Venomous animals include rattlesnakes, scorpions, and Gila monsters.

Population composition

The indigenous peoples of Arizona are renowned for their rich cultural diversity. However, since the 19th century, the urbanized segments of the state have been cultural outposts that have more obviously reflected tastes, fashions, speech, religious preferences, political attitudes, and life-styles that have come from such diverse localities as Chicago, New York City, Washington, D.C., San Francisco, and Los Angeles.

Until the latter half of the 19th century, except for very small and scattered groups of indigenous peoples, almost all of central and northern Arizona remained uninhabited. Most of the Spanish occupation of the state was tentative at best and, owing to the constant danger posed by actively hostile Apache bands, remained confined to a few intermittently occupied missions, presidios, and ranches in the Santa Cruz valley, south of Tucson.

At the time of Arizona’s acquisition (as part of New Mexico; see Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo) by the United States in 1848, fewer than 1,000 people of Hispanic origin lived in Arizona. Not until the 20th century did the number of Hispanic residents in Arizona soar. Today most are Mexicans or descendants of Mexicans who have arrived since 1900. Relations between Mexican Americans and Anglos (a term used by Hispanics for English-speaking whites) have at times been strained in Arizona, but in general the two ethnic groups have a history of cordiality that has often been absent in other border states. While some communities have Mexican barrios (ethnic quarters, often characterized by severe poverty), most Mexican Americans in Arizona live in a variety of neighbourhoods and participate fully in the state’s business, political, and social life. Intermarriage with Anglos is common. Although Mexican food, building styles, home furnishings, clothing, social customs, and music have been incorporated into the Arizona lifestyle and are widely shared by longtime residents, the great majority of people (most of whom are relative newcomers to the state from other parts of the country) have been affected by Mexican culture in only a superficial way. If anything, the Mexican American population has been attracted to mainstream American culture.

Although the Native American peoples of Arizona, since the time of the Spanish conquistadores, have been subjugated, badly exploited, and abused—much as they were elsewhere—this did not cause the total annihilation or permanent displacement of their population. The culture of Native Americans is very much in evidence in Arizona, although they constitute less than one-tenth of the total population. Native Americans are grouped into 15 tribes on 17 reservations that range in size from the 85-acre (34-hectare) Tonto Apache reserve to the 23,400-square-mile (60,600-square-km) reserve (nearly three-fifths of which lies in Arizona) of the Navajo. The latter tribe, numbering about 100,000 in Arizona, is deeply involved in directing the development of its land and people, and the tribal government assumes complete responsibility in many areas of Navajo social and economic life. Among the remaining tribes the best known are the legendary Apache and the much-studied Hopi. The Tohono O’odham and the Akimel O’odham (Pima) peoples have also received much attention in the anthropological and historical literature. Less well known are the Havasupai, who live at the bottom of the Grand Canyon, the Hualapai, the Yaqui, and the Yavapai. (For more information on the Havasupai, Hualapai, and Yavapai, see Yuman.)

Arizona’s African American population constitutes only a small proportion of the state’s total. Most of Arizona’s cities and towns include predominantly African American neighbourhoods, the result of de facto housing segregation. The state voluntarily desegregated its schools in the early 1940s. Asians and Pacific Islanders are growing in numbers but still constitute the smallest minorities in the state.

Settlement patterns

Despite Arizona’s romantic image as a land of picturesque ghost towns and mining camps, isolated ranches, Native American reservations, and bucolic cotton and citrus farms, virtually all of its population is concentrated in urban areas. Three-fifths of the state’s people live in just one of the state’s 15 counties—Maricopa, where Phoenix is located. Of the 15 counties, 6 collectively contain four-fifths of the state’s population. Only a small number of people live on farms and ranches. Most towns and cities have low population densities.

Buildings of adobe can be seen in the older inhabited areas of southern Arizona, while Flagstaff and Prescott—northern Arizona cities settled by New Englanders in the 1860s and ’70s—have Victorian-style houses that reflect the traditions and preferences of their first inhabitants.

Phoenix is the primary trade centre of the state. Its central location, extensive agricultural economy, and attractive vacation and retirement amenities have caused it to become one of the largest and fastest-growing urban areas in the Southwest. Tucson, while older and smaller, has acted as a doorway to Mexico and maintains well-developed commercial and medical ties with Sonora and other northern states of Mexico. Since 1970, its population growth rate has rivaled that of Phoenix.

Demographic trends

In the early 21st century Arizona’s population experienced dramatic growth at almost three times the national rate. Just over a quarter of the population was under age 18. Some of the new residents, as in the past, were “snowbirds,” retirees who spend the winter in the comparatively warm desert and return to other domiciles when the weather turns hot. So-called “white flight” from California and out-migration from declining industrial areas in the Midwestern and Eastern United States accounted for many arrivals of working age. Still other newcomers were lured by opportunities in the metropolitan areas, whose economies were beginning to mature to include desirable high-paying jobs. An untold number arrived illegally, most from Mexico and Central America, and filled the ranks of the state’s low-paid service and agricultural sectors. The overall population was projected to reach 10 million by the year 2027.

Before World War II the focus of Arizona’s economy was primary production—mineral extraction, lumbering, cattle raising, and crop growing. Since the late 1940s the focus has shifted toward manufacturing industry and services, the economy becoming one that better represents the country’s growing affluence and technology. This is especially true of the Phoenix area, where a vibrant high-technology economy has arisen.

Agriculture and livestock

Good soil, plenty of irrigation water, and a long growing season enable Arizona to produce cotton, alfalfa, and a variety of grains, vegetables, fruits, and nuts. Arizona continues to be one of the country’s leading cotton producers. For many years citrus growing has remained an important and expanding part of the state’s economy, and, more recently, wine producers have been successful growing a number of varietal grapes. Livestock products include beef, dairy goods, and poultry and eggs. The average size of farms in Arizona is larger than that in any other state, and farmers and ranchers use more than four-fifths of the state’s water.

Resources and power

Metallic ores such as copper, zinc, and, to a modest degree, silver and gold traditionally have brought revenue to the state. Coal from the Black Mesa area of the Native American reservations in northeastern Arizona is important, since coal-fired stations generate much of the electricity for the southwestern United States; the northeastern area also produces a small amount of petroleum, as well as large quantities of uranium.

Since the 1880s, northern Arizona’s massive stands of ponderosa pine have supplied a strong lumber and pulp-paper industry in the state. Rich alluvial soils, particularly in Yuma, Pinal, Pima, and Maricopa counties, have supported large and profitable agricultural operations. The state’s attractive climate and landscape can also be counted among its most valuable resources.

The natural geographic corridor created by the Colorado Plateau together with its Mogollon Rim escarpment has made possible Arizona’s irrigation projects and most of the state’s hydroelectric power, including that generated by the Roosevelt, Hoover, and Glen Canyon dams. Altogether, nearly a dozen dams control the Mogollon Rim’s runoff, impounding and diverting the water to provide flood control and lakes for water storage. This hydrologic pattern has been a source of much political and legal trouble for Arizona, including years of litigation with California over rights to water from the Colorado River system. The state’s internal sharing of water is also a major problem because groundwater has been depleted, particularly around Phoenix and Tucson, and there are no new sources of surface water. Cities have found it necessary to buy water rights from distant areas, and litigation involving municipalities, Native American tribes, and federal agencies over water rights is increasingly common.

Manufacturing

Between 1880 and 1950 the production of copper remained by far the most important industry in Arizona. Arizona is still the leading copper-producing state in the country, but manufacturing has grown to become the state’s most important basic industry, notably in electronics, communications, aeronautics, and aluminum. Although this growth has brought one of the most dynamic and affluent economies in the nation, many of Arizona’s outlying counties, particularly those with large Native American populations, remain among the poorest areas in the country.

Tourism and retirement

Urban and industrial expansion have so polluted major areas of Arizona that it no longer serves as the refuge it once did for sick people seeking pure air. The climate, scenery, and casual lifestyle, however, still attract millions of visitors each year, and the state has become a popular retirement centre, particularly in the lower desert areas. Large retirement communities such as Sun City, near Phoenix, and Green Valley, near Tucson, have continued to grow.

Transportation

Like other western states, Arizona has not emphasized the development of mass transit systems, and state and municipal governments struggle to build sufficient roads to accommodate a swelling population. It has long been so. The state’s earliest service industry was long-distance cartage over rough desert and mountain country; in modern times, the five interstate highways that pass through Arizona are crowded with heavy trucks. These highways generally follow historic roads, most of which were established along Native American trade routes and accommodated stagecoaches and freight carriers. The railroads followed in the later 19th century, with well-established east-west routes passing through southern and northern Arizona, but there was little service to the rugged interior. A greater focus on mass transit development was evident in the state’s larger cities in the early 21st century. A light-rail system that served Phoenix and the surrounding areas began operating in 2008, and Tucson launched a streetcar service in 2014.

Surface transportation is generally organized on the model of southern California, with streets on a grid pattern punctuated by freeways and highways. Within the cities some attention has been given to the development of bicycle paths. Phoenix’s Sky Harbor International Airport offers nonstop international and domestic flights; Tucson International Airport provides more-limited nonstop flights; and Flagstaff and Yuma airports have fewer still. Many other towns have airports capable of accommodating small jet aircraft, and there are numerous military airfields as well.


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SOURCE: http://www.britannica.com/place/Arizona-state

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What is the time in usa texas now – Video

#Difference #Between #Central #Time #Zone #- #Pacific #Time #Zone, #USA #Today



What is the time in usa texas now

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Difference Between Central Time Zone & Pacific Time Zone

Travel Tips

North American Time Zones extend north into Canada and south into Mexico. (Photo: Comstock/Comstock/Getty Images )

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Before worldwide, legally mandated time zones were introduced, every town kept its own local time. Today, time zones establish order and allow national and international systems to operate, but we have maintained a fragmented time map in large countries. In the U.S., with four time zones in the contiguous 48 states, you can still gain or lose an hour when you go to the next town.

Time Difference

A two-hour time differences separates Central Time from Pacific Time, with Central Time falling two hours ahead. In official terminology, the Central Time Zone is UTC-06, which means the time in the Central Time Zone is six hours behind the Coordinated Universal Time. The Pacific Time Zone is UTC-08. During the fall, winter and spring periods of legal daylight savings time, the Central Time Zone shifts to UTC-05 and the Pacific Time Zone shifts to UTC-07.

The Pacific Time Zone lies along the western coast of North America, reaching north from the lower 48 states of the U.S. up into Canada, stopping at the Alaskan border. Moving from west to east, the Pacific Time Zone is follow by the Mountain Time Zone, the Central Time Zone and the Eastern Time Zone, which extends along the eastern seaboard. The western border of the Central Time Zone begins at the northwestern edge of North Dakota and extends jaggedly down to the northwestern edge of Texas, while the eastern edge descends from Lake Michigan in Indiana down through Florida along the line of the Georgia-Alabama border.

Included Areas

From north to south, the Pacific Time Zone includes British Colombia, Yukon and the Tungsten in Canada; Washington, Oregon, California, Nevada and Idaho in the United States and the state of Baja California in Mexico. Central Time includes the entirety of one Canadian province and 10 U.S. states, partial sections of three Canadian provinces and territories and 10 U.S. states, most of Mexico and a large part of Central America. Manitoba, Oklahoma, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, Wisconsin, Illinois, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama all fall completely within the Central Time Zone.

Whole States vs. Partial States

The Central Time Zone does not follow such clear boundaries as the Pacific Time Zone, which roughly follows state lines. The Pacific Time zone splits Idaho in half and excludes a small section of Oregon. The Central Time Zone includes the same number of partial states as full states. On both the eastern and western boundaries, the edge of the Central Time Zone cuts five states in two: North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas and Texas to the west and Michigan, Indiana, Tennessee, Kentucky and Florida to the east.

References

About the Author

Gabi Logan began writing food and travel articles in 2004. Logan’s work has appeared in Boston-area online magazines, including “The Second Glass” and “The Savvy Bostonian,” and in publications at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has a Bachelor of Arts in Italian language and culture from Smith College.

Leaf Group is a USA TODAY content partner providing general travel information. Its content is produced independently of USA TODAY.


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Illinois on a map of the us @ Video

#Illinois #Printable #Map



Illinois on a map of the us

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Printable political Map of Illinois

Political map showing roads and major cities and political boundaries of Illinois state.

To zoom in, hover over the Printable political Map of IL State

Download Illinois Printable Map

Original high-resolution image: Printable Illinois Map

Printable Illinois Map

This printable map of Illinois is free and available for download. You can print this political map and use it in your projects. The original source of this Printable political Map of Illinois is: YellowMaps.com. This free to print map is a static image in jpg format. You can save it as an image by clicking on the print map to access the original Illinois Printable Map file. The map covers the following area: state, Illinois, showing political boundaries and roads and major cities of Illinois.

Online Maps of Illinois

Paper Maps of Illinois

Navigational Charts of Illinois

Get Illinois Nautical Charts at our map store. These navigational marine charts are available for purchase, and up to date with the latest Notice to Mariners.

Topographic Maps of Illinois

Get more Illinois USGS Topo Maps at our map store. These topographic maps are available for purchase, and you can download them as high-resolution PDFs as well.

Alternatively, you can buy them on disk as digital map collections: USGS digital topo maps


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#What number is pennsylvania in the united states \ #Video

#What #number #is #pennsylvania #in #the #united #states



What number is pennsylvania in the united states

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United States

United States, officially United States of America, abbreviated U.S. or U.S.A., byname America, country in North America, a federal republic of 50 states. Besides the 48 conterminous states that occupy the middle latitudes of the continent, the United States includes the state of Alaska, at the northwestern extreme of North America, and the island state of Hawaii, in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The conterminous states are bounded on the north by Canada, on the east by the Atlantic Ocean, on the south by the Gulf of Mexico and Mexico, and on the west by the Pacific Ocean. The United States is the fourth largest country in the world in area (after Russia, Canada, and China). The national capital is Washington, which is coextensive with the District of Columbia, the federal capital region created in 1790.

The major characteristic of the United States is probably its great variety. Its physical environment ranges from the Arctic to the subtropical, from the moist rain forest to the arid desert, from the rugged mountain peak to the flat prairie. Although the total population of the United States is large by world standards, its overall population density is relatively low. The country embraces some of the world’s largest urban concentrations as well as some of the most extensive areas that are almost devoid of habitation.

The United States contains a highly diverse population. Unlike a country such as China that largely incorporated indigenous peoples, the United States has a diversity that to a great degree has come from an immense and sustained global immigration. Probably no other country has a wider range of racial, ethnic, and cultural types than does the United States. In addition to the presence of surviving Native Americans (including American Indians, Aleuts, and Eskimos) and the descendants of Africans taken as slaves to the New World, the national character has been enriched, tested, and constantly redefined by the tens of millions of immigrants who by and large have come to America hoping for greater social, political, and economic opportunities than they had in the places they left. (It should be noted that although the terms “America” and “Americans” are often used as synonyms for the United States and its citizens, respectively, they are also used in a broader sense for North, South, and Central America collectively and their citizens.)

The United States is the world’s greatest economic power, measured in terms of gross domestic product (GDP). The nation’s wealth is partly a reflection of its rich natural resources and its enormous agricultural output, but it owes more to the country’s highly developed industry. Despite its relative economic self-sufficiency in many areas, the United States is the most important single factor in world trade by virtue of the sheer size of its economy. Its exports and imports represent major proportions of the world total. The United States also impinges on the global economy as a source of and as a destination for investment capital. The country continues to sustain an economic life that is more diversified than any other on Earth, providing the majority of its people with one of the world’s highest standards of living.

The United States is relatively young by world standards, being less than 250 years old; it achieved its current size only in the mid-20th century. America was the first of the European colonies to separate successfully from its motherland, and it was the first nation to be established on the premise that sovereignty rests with its citizens and not with the government. In its first century and a half, the country was mainly preoccupied with its own territorial expansion and economic growth and with social debates that ultimately led to civil war and a healing period that is still not complete. In the 20th century the United States emerged as a world power, and since World War II it has been one of the preeminent powers. It has not accepted this mantle easily nor always carried it willingly; the principles and ideals of its founders have been tested by the pressures and exigencies of its dominant status. The United States still offers its residents opportunities for unparalleled personal advancement and wealth. However, the depletion of its resources, the contamination of its environment, and the continuing social and economic inequality that perpetuates areas of poverty and blight all threaten the fabric of the country.

The District of Columbia is discussed in the article Washington. For discussion of other major U.S. cities, see the articles Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New Orleans, New York City, Philadelphia, and San Francisco. Political units in association with the United States include Puerto Rico, discussed in the article Puerto Rico, and several Pacific islands, discussed in Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, and American Samoa.

The two great sets of elements that mold the physical environment of the United States are, first, the geologic, which determines the main patterns of landforms, drainage, and mineral resources and influences soils to a lesser degree, and, second, the atmospheric, which dictates not only climate and weather but also in large part the distribution of soils, plants, and animals. Although these elements are not entirely independent of one another, each produces on a map patterns that are so profoundly different that essentially they remain two separate geographies. (Since this article covers only the conterminous United States, see also the articles Alaska and Hawaii.)

The centre of the conterminous United States is a great sprawling interior lowland, reaching from the ancient shield of central Canada on the north to the Gulf of Mexico on the south. To east and west this lowland rises, first gradually and then abruptly, to mountain ranges that divide it from the sea on both sides. The two mountain systems differ drastically. The Appalachian Mountains on the east are low, almost unbroken, and in the main set well back from the Atlantic. From New York to the Mexican border stretches the low Coastal Plain, which faces the ocean along a swampy, convoluted coast. The gently sloping surface of the plain extends out beneath the sea, where it forms the continental shelf, which, although submerged beneath shallow ocean water, is geologically identical to the Coastal Plain. Southward the plain grows wider, swinging westward in Georgia and Alabama to truncate the Appalachians along their southern extremity and separate the interior lowland from the Gulf.

West of the Central Lowland is the mighty Cordillera, part of a global mountain system that rings the Pacific basin. The Cordillera encompasses fully one-third of the United States, with an internal variety commensurate with its size. At its eastern margin lie the Rocky Mountains, a high, diverse, and discontinuous chain that stretches all the way from New Mexico to the Canadian border. The Cordillera’s western edge is a Pacific coastal chain of rugged mountains and inland valleys, the whole rising spectacularly from the sea without benefit of a coastal plain. Pent between the Rockies and the Pacific chain is a vast intermontane complex of basins, plateaus, and isolated ranges so large and remarkable that they merit recognition as a region separate from the Cordillera itself.

These regions—the Interior Lowlands and their upland fringes, the Appalachian Mountain system, the Atlantic Plain, the Western Cordillera, and the Western Intermontane Region—are so various that they require further division into 24 major subregions, or provinces.

The Interior Lowlands and their upland fringes

Andrew Jackson is supposed to have remarked that the United States begins at the Alleghenies, implying that only west of the mountains, in the isolation and freedom of the great Interior Lowlands, could people finally escape Old World influences. Whether or not the lowlands constitute the country’s cultural core is debatable, but there can be no doubt that they comprise its geologic core and in many ways its geographic core as well.

This enormous region rests upon an ancient, much-eroded platform of complex crystalline rocks that have for the most part lain undisturbed by major orogenic (mountain-building) activity for more than 600,000,000 years. Over much of central Canada, these Precambrian rocks are exposed at the surface and form the continent’s single largest topographical region, the formidable and ice-scoured Canadian Shield.

In the United States most of the crystalline platform is concealed under a deep blanket of sedimentary rocks. In the far north, however, the naked Canadian Shield extends into the United States far enough to form two small but distinctive landform regions: the rugged and occasionally spectacular Adirondack Mountains of northern New York and the more-subdued and austere Superior Upland of northern Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan. As in the rest of the shield, glaciers have stripped soils away, strewn the surface with boulders and other debris, and obliterated preglacial drainage systems. Most attempts at farming in these areas have been abandoned, but the combination of a comparative wilderness in a northern climate, clear lakes, and white-water streams has fostered the development of both regions as year-round outdoor recreation areas.

Mineral wealth in the Superior Upland is legendary. Iron lies near the surface and close to the deepwater ports of the upper Great Lakes. Iron is mined both north and south of Lake Superior, but best known are the colossal deposits of Minnesota’s Mesabi Range, for more than a century one of the world’s richest and a vital element in America’s rise to industrial power. In spite of depletion, the Minnesota and Michigan mines still yield a major proportion of the country’s iron and a significant percentage of the world’s supply.

South of the Adirondack Mountains and the Superior Upland lies the boundary between crystalline and sedimentary rocks; abruptly, everything is different. The core of this sedimentary region—the heartland of the United States—is the great Central Lowland, which stretches for 1,500 miles (2,400 kilometres) from New York to central Texas and north another 1,000 miles to the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. To some, the landscape may seem dull, for heights of more than 2,000 feet (600 metres) are unusual, and truly rough terrain is almost lacking. Landscapes are varied, however, largely as the result of glaciation that directly or indirectly affected most of the subregion. North of the Missouri–Ohio river line, the advance and readvance of continental ice left an intricate mosaic of boulders, sand, gravel, silt, and clay and a complex pattern of lakes and drainage channels, some abandoned, some still in use. The southern part of the Central Lowland is quite different, covered mostly with loess (wind-deposited silt) that further subdued the already low relief surface. Elsewhere, especially near major rivers, postglacial streams carved the loess into rounded hills, and visitors have aptly compared their billowing shapes to the waves of the sea. Above all, the loess produces soil of extraordinary fertility. As the Mesabi iron was a major source of America’s industrial wealth, its agricultural prosperity has been rooted in Midwestern loess.

The Central Lowland resembles a vast saucer, rising gradually to higher lands on all sides. Southward and eastward, the land rises gradually to three major plateaus. Beyond the reach of glaciation to the south, the sedimentary rocks have been raised into two broad upwarps, separated from one another by the great valley of the Mississippi River. The Ozark Plateau lies west of the river and occupies most of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas; on the east the Interior Low Plateaus dominate central Kentucky and Tennessee. Except for two nearly circular patches of rich limestone country—the Nashville Basin of Tennessee and the Kentucky Bluegrass region—most of both plateau regions consists of sandstone uplands, intricately dissected by streams. Local relief runs to several hundreds of feet in most places, and visitors to the region must travel winding roads along narrow stream valleys. The soils there are poor, and mineral resources are scanty.

Eastward from the Central Lowland the Appalachian Plateau—a narrow band of dissected uplands that strongly resembles the Ozark Plateau and Interior Low Plateaus in steep slopes, wretched soils, and endemic poverty—forms a transition between the interior plains and the Appalachian Mountains. Usually, however, the Appalachian Plateau is considered a subregion of the Appalachian Mountains, partly on grounds of location, partly because of geologic structure. Unlike the other plateaus, where rocks are warped upward, the rocks there form an elongated basin, wherein bituminous coal has been preserved from erosion. This Appalachian coal, like the Mesabi iron that it complements in U.S. industry, is extraordinary. Extensive, thick, and close to the surface, it has stoked the furnaces of northeastern steel mills for decades and helps explain the huge concentration of heavy industry along the lower Great Lakes.

The western flanks of the Interior Lowlands are the Great Plains, a territory of awesome bulk that spans the full distance between Canada and Mexico in a swath nearly 500 miles (800 km) wide. The Great Plains were built by successive layers of poorly cemented sand, silt, and gravel—debris laid down by parallel east-flowing streams from the Rocky Mountains. Seen from the east, the surface of the Great Plains rises inexorably from about 2,000 feet (600 metres) near Omaha, Nebraska, to more than 6,000 feet (1,825 metres) at Cheyenne, Wyoming, but the climb is so gradual that popular legend holds the Great Plains to be flat. True flatness is rare, although the High Plains of western Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and eastern Colorado come close. More commonly, the land is broadly rolling, and parts of the northern plains are sharply dissected into badlands.

The main mineral wealth of the Interior Lowlands derives from fossil fuels. Coal occurs in structural basins protected from erosion—high-quality bituminous in the Appalachian, Illinois, and western Kentucky basins; and subbituminous and lignite in the eastern and northwestern Great Plains. Petroleum and natural gas have been found in nearly every state between the Appalachians and the Rockies, but the Midcontinent Fields of western Texas and the Texas Panhandle, Oklahoma, and Kansas surpass all others. Aside from small deposits of lead and zinc, metallic minerals are of little importance.

The Appalachian Mountain system

The Appalachians dominate the eastern United States and separate the Eastern Seaboard from the interior with a belt of subdued uplands that extends nearly 1,500 miles (2,400 km) from northeastern Alabama to the Canadian border. They are old, complex mountains, the eroded stumps of much greater ranges. Present topography results from erosion that has carved weak rocks away, leaving a skeleton of resistant rocks behind as highlands. Geologic differences are thus faithfully reflected in topography. In the Appalachians these differences are sharply demarcated and neatly arranged, so that all the major subdivisions except New England lie in strips parallel to the Atlantic and to one another.

The core of the Appalachians is a belt of complex metamorphic and igneous rocks that stretches all the way from Alabama to New Hampshire. The western side of this belt forms the long slender rampart of the Blue Ridge Mountains, containing the highest elevations in the Appalachians ( Mount Mitchell, North Carolina, 6,684 feet [2,037 metres]) and some of its most handsome mountain scenery. On its eastern, or seaward, side the Blue Ridge descends in an abrupt and sometimes spectacular escarpment to the Piedmont, a well-drained, rolling land—never quite hills, but never quite a plain. Before the settlement of the Midwest the Piedmont was the most productive agricultural region in the United States, and several Pennsylvania counties still consistently report some of the highest farm yields per acre in the entire country.

West of the crystalline zone, away from the axis of primary geologic deformation, sedimentary rocks have escaped metamorphism but are compressed into tight folds. Erosion has carved the upturned edges of these folded rocks into the remarkable Ridge and Valley country of the western Appalachians. Long linear ridges characteristically stand about 1,000 feet (300 metres) from base to crest and run for tens of miles, paralleled by broad open valleys of comparable length. In Pennsylvania, ridges run unbroken for great distances, occasionally turning abruptly in a zigzag pattern; by contrast, the southern ridges are broken by faults and form short, parallel segments that are lined up like magnetized iron filings. By far the largest valley—and one of the most important routes in North America—is the Great Valley, an extraordinary trench of shale and limestone that runs nearly the entire length of the Appalachians. It provides a lowland passage from the middle Hudson valley to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and on southward, where it forms the Shenandoah and Cumberland valleys, and has been one of the main paths through the Appalachians since pioneer times. In New England it is floored with slates and marbles and forms the Valley of Vermont, one of the few fertile areas in an otherwise mountainous region.

Topography much like that of the Ridge and Valley is found in the Ouachita Mountains of western Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma, an area generally thought to be a detached continuation of Appalachian geologic structure, the intervening section buried beneath the sediments of the lower Mississippi valley.

The once-glaciated New England section of the Appalachians is divided from the rest of the chain by an indentation of the Atlantic. Although almost completely underlain by crystalline rocks, New England is laid out in north–south bands, reminiscent of the southern Appalachians. The rolling, rocky hills of southeastern New England are not dissimilar to the Piedmont, while, farther northwest, the rugged and lofty White Mountains are a New England analogue to the Blue Ridge. ( Mount Washington, New Hampshire, at 6,288 feet [1,917 metres], is the highest peak in the northeastern United States.) The westernmost ranges—the Taconics, Berkshires, and Green Mountains—show a strong north–south lineation like the Ridge and Valley. Unlike the rest of the Appalachians, however, glaciation has scoured the crystalline rocks much like those of the Canadian Shield, so that New England is best known for its picturesque landscape, not for its fertile soil.

Typical of diverse geologic regions, the Appalachians contain a great variety of minerals. Only a few occur in quantities large enough for sustained exploitation, notably iron in Pennsylvania’s Blue Ridge and Piedmont and the famous granites, marbles, and slates of northern New England. In Pennsylvania the Ridge and Valley region contains one of the world’s largest deposits of anthracite coal, once the basis of a thriving mining economy; many of the mines are now shut, oil and gas having replaced coal as the major fuel used to heat homes.

The Atlantic Plain

The eastern and southeastern fringes of the United States are part of the outermost margins of the continental platform, repeatedly invaded by the sea and veneered with layer after layer of young, poorly consolidated sediments. Part of this platform now lies slightly above sea level and forms a nearly flat and often swampy coastal plain, which stretches from Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to beyond the Mexican border. Most of the platform, however, is still submerged, so that a band of shallow water, the continental shelf, parallels the Atlantic and Gulf coasts, in some places reaching 250 miles (400 km) out to sea.

The Atlantic Plain slopes so gently that even slight crustal upwarping can shift the coastline far out to sea at the expense of the continental shelf. The peninsula of Florida is just such an upwarp: nowhere in its 400-mile (640-km) length does the land rise more than 350 feet (100 metres) above sea level; much of the southern and coastal areas rise less than 10 feet (3 metres) and are poorly drained and dangerously exposed to Atlantic storms. Downwarps can result in extensive flooding. North of New York City, for example, the weight of glacial ice depressed most of the Coastal Plain beneath the sea, and the Atlantic now beats directly against New England’s rock-ribbed coasts. Cape Cod, Long Island (New York), and a few offshore islands are all that remain of New England’s drowned Coastal Plain. Another downwarp lies perpendicular to the Gulf coast and guides the course of the lower Mississippi. The river, however, has filled with alluvium what otherwise would be an arm of the Gulf, forming a great inland salient of the Coastal Plain called the Mississippi Embayment.

South of New York the Coastal Plain gradually widens, but ocean water has invaded the lower valleys of most of the coastal rivers and has turned them into estuaries. The greatest of these is Chesapeake Bay, merely the flooded lower valley of the Susquehanna River and its tributaries, but there are hundreds of others. Offshore a line of sandbars and barrier beaches stretches intermittently the length of the Coastal Plain, hampering entry of shipping into the estuaries but providing the eastern United States with a playground that is more than 1,000 miles (1,600 km) long.

Poor soils are the rule on the Coastal Plain, though rare exceptions have formed some of America’s most famous agricultural regions—for example, the citrus country of central Florida’s limestone uplands and the Cotton Belt of the Old South, once centred on the alluvial plain of the Mississippi and belts of chalky black soils of eastern Texas, Alabama, and Mississippi. The Atlantic Plain’s greatest natural wealth derives from petroleum and natural gas trapped in domal structures that dot the Gulf Coast of eastern Texas and Louisiana. Onshore and offshore drilling have revealed colossal reserves of oil and natural gas.


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SOURCE: SOURCE: NEF6.COM
http://www.britannica.com/place/United-States

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Why is alaska part of the united states

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51 or 52 United States?

Many people recall the United States including 51 or 52 states, not 50.

The interesting point is that the memories are fairly consistent, and include Puerto Rico as a state.

One teacher suggested this is a common misunderstanding.

The daughter of another teacher said that she clearly recalls her mother teaching students that the 52 states included Puerto Rico.

So, is this simple confusion or a glimpse into alternate geography in another timestream?

Ben Conroy said:

My experience doesnt involve a memory as much as a strange coincidence. For years I firmly believed there to be 52 states in America. Quite a shock when I found out there was only 50,

After this, I must have asked 25-30 people (in Europe, as I’m Irish), literally everbody I met, how many states in America. Every one said 52. After I said there was 50, their reaction remained ‘oh yea. wierd.’

Maybe theres another explanation for it, but occasionally I still ask and hear 52!

I encourage anybody reading this to ask people away from America (who wouldn’t know as readily) and see how many times 52 is replied!

Joy replied:

I’m from Portugal, and I thought it was 52 states in America too!

Victor agreed:

What the heck? I always thought there were 52 States in America. I’m from Brazil btw.

Jasper Allen (in the U.K.) said the same:

I was also taught at school that America had 52 states.

Siphakeme said:

i grew studying that the US has 52 states too

Kassia said:

52 States (I am European),etc, etc.

aragami agreed:

52 states in the US

miss_fionna said:

I also remember being taught that there was 52 states with Alaska being number 51 (even though at this point I only remember there being 50, and that was over ten years ago.

Kate said:

I seem to have a fuzzy memory of 52 states as well. And i remembered it was 52, because it was the same as the number of cards in a deck. Suddenly at some point it was 50, and I remember thinking…I ‘know’ it was 52. Suddenly teachers were telling me…’You’re confusing this with the number of cards in a deck” which I thought was weird because that’s how we remembered it as kids.

Pam said:

I can say that I live in the US and for some reason I could swear that 52 states has a familiarity. I know I have a couple times had to really think before I said 52 or 52 because I knew it was off somehow. Or I would reword my phrase to not mention a number because I just was not sure anymore.

David (who has an alternate Mandela memory) confirmed confusion about the states:

I am US History teacher in the US and my American students often mistakenly think there are 51 or 52 states at which I just shake my head and say,”kids today.”
I think it’s because there was a lot of talk about Puerto Rico becoming a state, which would have been the 51st… but it hasn’t happened yet.

L. said:

Also, I remember my mother always saying 52 states instead of 50 when I was growing up and getting annoyed because she was a teacher and thats such common knowledge.

Josh asked:

To the people who remember being taught about 52 States, do you remember the names of the other two?

miss_fiona said:

I remember arguing with our teacher over the number because I had been taught that there was fifty until that point. According to her Hawaii was the 51st state, but I don’t remember what she said was the 52nd.

Hoss listed the 52 states as he recalls them, including Puerto Rico and D.C.:

1. Alabama, 2. Alaska, 3. Arizona, 4. Arkansas 5. Colorado 6. California, 7. Connecticut, 8. Delaware, 9. Florida, 10. Georgia, 11. Hawaii, 12. Illinois, 13. Indiana, 14. Idaho, 15. Iowa, 16. Kentucky, 17. Kansas, 18. Louisiana, 19. Massachusetts, 20. Maryland, 21. Mississippi, 22. Maine, 23. Missouri, 24. Michigan 25. Minnesota, 26. Montana, 27. New Jersey, 28. New York, 29. North Carolina 30. New Hampshire, 31. Nevada, 32. Nebraska, 33. North Dakota 34. New Mexico, 35. Oklahoma, 36. Ohio, 37. Oregon, 38. Pennsylvania, 39. Puerto Rico. 40. Rhode Island 41. South Carolina, 42. South Dakota, 43. Tennessee, 44. Texas, 45. Utah, 46. Virginia, 47. Vermont, 48. Wisconsin, 49. West Virginia, 50. Washington, 51. Wyoming, 52. Washington DC

So, I think the question really is: In an alternate timeline, did Puerto Rico already become a state? Or, did the District of Columbia become one, separately or as well?

Or, is this simply confusion over districts, territories, and states?

Note: Comments that say that there really are 50 states in this timestream, will be deleted. We already know that. That’s exactly why 51 or 52 states seem like an anomaly, and worth discussing at this website.

186 thoughts on “51 or 52 United States?”

It sounds like teachers outside of the US do not address the difference in rights between a Federal US territory and a State US territory. Instead they call the US territories states.
Americans call Canadian and Australian territories states too, but we don’t bother with remembering the number of them because we can count them with our fingers.

Will, it sounds like you have more fingers than I do, unless you’re not counting Canadian provinces at all. That would be odd, but technically correct if you’re focusing on territories.

Of course, some Americans don’t realize how neighboring countries are organised.

Regarding Canadian provinces and territories, here’s what Wikipedia says: “Canada’s external borders have changed several times. It has grown from four initial provinces to ten provinces and three territories as of 1999. The ten provinces are Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, and Saskatchewan. The three territories are Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and Yukon.”

That’s a total of 13, as I count them.

I learned in school Canada was 4 provinces (rectangles of roughly the same size), a “northern territory” across the top of them from Atlantic across hudson bay to the pacific, and that’s it.

I just looked on Wikipedia and that map isn’t even like “I was close and remember that wrong” or “some area became its own province”. That is a COMPLETELY different Canada then mine,

Same here Eric. I wsa taught that Canada had 4 Provinces.

There were only 4 provinces as of confederation (1867). That number quickly expanded.

I remember as a child confusing the number of states with the number of cards in a deck 52 cards in a deck and 50 states in the usa. i thought there was the same amount of each 52 .It wasnt until later in life i confirmed the 50 states in the usa . But remember obamas campain speech where he said he visited all 57 states? Maybe that ties into this topic somehow?

I grew up in puerto rico and was thought 50 states of course that was b4 Hawaii., i went to school back in the early 70’s and was thought that puerto Rico is a associated liberal state. Not yet a state! A good bio to read about puerto rico and albiso campos .

I live in New York in America. In high school I was talking with a girl after school about our country and she said we had 52 states and Puerto Rico was a state. I told her she was absurd and we walked back into the school to ask a teacher. She also said Alaska was not a state. It was a weird thing I overlooked until now.

I always felt weird about this but I remember learning that we had 52 states and it took a while for me to be corrected and that we had 50 later and to check the flags stars to remember. I also had a weird amnesia episode though around that time though, so I never give myself any creditability back then.

Wow amazing I’m reading this because I home thought I was told 52 in school and last year I lived in a program with 500 other people well in the hallway I waited by the stairwell and asked everyone I saw coming in how many states did they believe was in America and oddly enough a staggering amount of people believed 52 was correct maybe 1 out 4 were in the same boat as me and ridiculed we were how dumb could we be to get this wrong but I remember social studies class learning 52 states and aparantley so does a whole bunch of people so witch is it are we creating false memories or did history change but our memory’s preserved pieces of a known fact of history we lived and some how we are affected by time travel or a parallel universe

I am from England and I thought there were 50 states and then they added Alaska and Hawaii, making 52.

I am from Canada and that is what I was taught also. 50 states until Alaska and Hawaii were added making 52.

I specifically remember being a kid and watching that FRIENDS episode where Ross is trying to list all of the states and he even makes the little world map and there were 51 or 52 states. Then later as an adult watching the same episode and there were only 50 and I felt surprised and looked it up and there really were only 50.

I grew up in British Columbia, Canada and remember being taught there were 52 with the last additions being Hawaii and Alaska. I remember drawing 52 stars on an art project and counting them out. I don’t remember what the other states were but that there had been 50 for a long time before the last two were added.

I too thought (and was taught by my mother) that Alaska and Hawaii were late additions, making a total of 52 states. Weird!!

Tjat is what I remember as well…I believe you are correct: however, it is very confusing.

I am a 38 year old, American man. I swear on everything I love and hold dear to me that when I was in sixth grade – my teacher taught us that we had 52 states – and that Alaska & Hawaii were the last two added. I remember it very clearly because I went home telling my parents that we now considered Hawaii and Alaska states. The entire class had to learn that there were now 52 states, and our teacher, Mr. Fox would sternly correct us if we slipped up and said 50. Then, out of the blue maybe 8 years later I started noticing that people always said we had 50 states and I remember thinking how dumb they must be. It took me years to accept that maybe I had for no reason had false memories that served zero purpose. I mean seriously, why would I remember it in such detail? What would be the possible gain my mind would get from creating such an obscure false memory? It happened. That much I am certain of.

I know for a 100 percent fact that I was taught 51 states, and I am an American.. From Boston to be exact and our schools loved American History, especially because of our pride for our part in the Revolution.. I know I was taught 51 because I always confused it with 52. I recall my mother and teacher correcting me, telling me there was only 51 states, Hawaii being the last. This has always, always stuck with me because I confused it so much that I had flashcards and studied. My mind is officially blown. As I thought it was Berenstein, yet thought it was just a trick of the mind, because sometimes our minds see what we think it should see when reading, this state thing has convinced me. I know it was 51

I do too! I feel so crazy, my parents remember 50 not 51. Obama made the same mistake on his 2008 presidential campaign stating “I am going to visit all 51 states”.

Cat8, as of 1 Jan 2016, I won’t be approving comments like this without links supporting them.

I’m approving this one to make a point: Unless there’s another time when that American president miscounted the number of states, he actually made a reference to 57 states.

If we don’t get the facts right about this reality, how will we have any credibility regarding our alternate memories? (Rhetorical question.)

The following is what I’m looking for in comments like this one.

Origins: On the campaign trail in Beaverton, Oregon, in May 2008, an obviously tired Barack Obama mistakenly told a crowd that over the course of the long campaign he had been to fifty-seven states in the U.S., with one left to go:

“… it is just wonderful to be back in Oregon, and over the last 15 months we’ve traveled to every corner of the United States. I’ve now been in fifty …. seven states? I think one left to go. One left to go. Alaska and Hawaii, I was not allowed to go to even though I really wanted to visit but my staff would not justify it.”

That’s exactly what I was taught in school

Hi Fiona! I just wanted to tell you that I love your website and I think the concept of “The Mandela Effect” is pretty amazing! I have shared some of your information. If you’d like to see it feel free to visit: http://angelicview.wordpress.com/2013/12/10/51-or-52-united-states-the-mandela-effect/
Let me know if there is any problem with my sharing.

Also, I remember there being 52 states!

Yeah me to from U.S. thought there was 52

I am from South Africa and one of my favourite things in the 4th grade was drawing flags. I always drew the american flag with 51 stars because that is what I was taught. I also just asked my husband who says he was taught there were 52 states. We are both equally shocked that there are actually 50 states.

As a child I remember struggling to get 52 stars to fit and look right when I drew or painted an American flag. Five rows of 10 stars, but how to get it to look right with 2extra stars? Maybe that’s why some flags now have 5 rows of 6 stars with 4 rows of 5 stars in between; alternating the amount of stars in the rows makes it impossible to eyeball and count quickly how many in each row, but then you can fit 4 rows of 7 stars alternating with 4 rows of 6 stars for a 52 star flag.

Such a relief that other people remember this stuff too

I asked around 20 people in school today.

No one said 50. Some said 51, some 52.

And one guy actually said: “everybody thinks there’s 50, but there’s actually 52!”

at that point I was too creeped out to continue.

yep. facts sure get creepy

I also remember 52. Puerto Rico being the 52nd.

I live in Europe and would have answered 52. I’m 31 years old, so “kids today” doesn’t apply to me. I was very good at school, got straight A’s in geography and history. I also would NOT have included Puerto Rico in my 52 states.

Sammy – I’m an American who will be 50 in March. I’ve always know the flag had 50 stars and known there were 50 states but I vaguely remember people talking about 50 states plus 2 – which I would have thought were U.S. territories, but that doesn’t make sense since there are more than 2 territories, 6 I believe. What would really be fascinating is if some who remember 52 could remember names of the additional two states. My mind would officially be blown – okay, it’s already been blown by my vague memories of Mandela dying and sharper memories of Billy Graham dying.

Note: More than other topics, this one seems to generate many comments along the lines of “you must have been confused,” or “my education was better than yours.”

I have just deleted another of several insulting comments.

I will not approve further ethnocentric comments suggesting the problem is educational, or that no American would make this “mistake.”

In the quote in my article, above, American teacher David (in the U.S., teaching U.S. history) has already confirmed that some American students believe there are 51 or 52 states, due to an educational error.

So, that point has been raised and confirmed. Some confusion may be educational. Clearly, that’s not unique to or exclusive of the U.S. After all, American commenter Will (above) seemed to suggest that Canada has so few state-like entities (provinces and territories), they can be counted on his fingers. (Canada has 10 provinces and three territories. That’s a total of 13, more than the number of fingers most people have.)

In general, I’ve tried to make it clear that the Mandela Effect is most often reported by intelligent, well-read, and well-educated people. In most cases, we don’t lack resources for independent research, looking for possible points of confusion. That’s been ruled out, before leaving a first-person report or comment here.

However, some visitors continue to explain (gently or not-so-gently) that the problem is entirely educational, and all Americans know there are only 50 states. Both of those assertions are in error. Comments like them have no place here.

I don’t mean to sound harsh. I just want to spare well-meaning visitors the time and effort of leaving comments that are, themselves, mistaken. And, in general, arrogant, ethnocentric, and insulting comments are never approved.

I have only just stumbled on this site after a friend emailed me an article about alternate memories on the spelling of Stan and Jan Berenst_in. This particular topic caught my attention. I am an American. I was in elementary school in the 80’s and very clearly remember learning there were 52 states. I was and always have been obsessed with history and knowledge and was a very good student, especially in topics surrounding history. I vividly remember having an argument with a fellow student over the number of states. I believed there were 52. He maintained there were 50 and eventually showed me in a text book the number of states in writing. I had no choice but to let go of my previous education. I did not consider it again until reading this article. I can not recall what the other 2 states were. Like many others I believed them to be Hawaii and Alaska, but did not learn Puerto Rico was a state. I distinctly remember learning the difference between states and territories. I have to say, I’m a tad relieved. I had put it out of my mind, but I remember being completely thrown off by the proof that there were not 52 states. It was however the driving force behind falling in love with research.

i posted earlier im an american iwas a history fanatic my whole life. I remember with absolute clarity 52 states the 2 newest being PUERTO RICO and GUAM.I would like to add I was blesssed with a phenominal memory unlike anyone i know. I even recall counting the stars on one occasion and coming up with 52. Furthermore I HAVE A MEMORY OF THE U.S.A. BEING CALLED BY A DIFFERENT NAME

“THE ENDURING CONSTITUTIONAL UNION” anyone else remember this?

Yes, Bustercasey, perfect! I am from the United States & I know that I was taught, in school, that there are 52 states, including Puerto Rico and Guam. (My Junior High years would have been in the early 70’s in Central Illinois.) I absolutely remember my teacher using the phrase, “including Puerto Rico and…” I couldn’t remember Guam until Bustercasey said it, but that was it. It was driving me crazy, so thank you.

I am from the United States and I was taught that there were 52 states in the US by my history teachers. When I got older and people told me I was wrong, and that there are only 50, I assumed that she was including Alaska and Hawaii, and that while they are a part of the US, maybe we were not supposed to count them as states. Of course I know now that the 50 includes those states. For years I wondered why my teachers taught me the wrong information about our country and I still to this day think 52 and have to correct myself. I’m 35 years old and from a major city. I also know for a fact that it was Berenstein Bears that I grew up with, but Berenstain. Just tonight I wrote it down with missing letters for my boyfriend to complete and he filled it in with “ie”. Doesn’t matter that his letters were backwards and he pronounced it as Stein too.

People think there are 52 because I think a lot of times people think there are 48 “continental” states plus Hawaii and Alaska which make 50. If you think 50 continental states plus Hawaii and Alaska I could see how you could misconstrue it to be 52.

I think many people recognize that as a way the numbers could be confusing. It’s a good point but it’s not the source of most of the reports I’ve read, at or related to this website.

Just to clarify, Fiona, in case you were responding to my comment and not all the comments in general, I meant that in MY reality, I’ve always known there to be 50 states, but I didn’t mean that there might not have been 52 in someone else’s reality, even if they were also American. (I wouldn’t have believed that possible 5 weeks ago or so.) I mentioned my nationality because I think it’s interesting to pinpoint where people are coming from with their respective information, not to be ethnocentric.

I apologize. I should have been clearer in my earlier comment, and I’ll edit it. I was reacting to a particularly insulting comment that I did not approve. This topic seems to get more than its share of comments that claim superior knowledge or education based on nationality or language. Those same comments insist that the 52-states issue is simply a misunderstanding based on a poor education.

The deleted comment was so insulting, I still had steam coming out of my ears when I posted my response. I didn’t phrase it as well as I might have.

The good news is: Since posting that comment, I’ve seen zero deliberately insulting, ethnocentric comments here.

>>>People think there are 52 because I think a lot of times people think there are 48 “continental” states plus Hawaii and Alaska which make 50. If you think 50 continental states plus Hawaii and Alaska I could see how you could misconstrue it to be 52.

But how did Obama misconstrue it to be 57 states?

50 states+DC+6 territories would be my guess.

HI I´m from dk.
i`m 53 years. i also remember 52 states and something in my memorie says 48 states
my younger brother thinks the same. so thank you too you Walter. G”,

No problem, Fiona! Sometimes I wonder if what I write is taken the way I mean it, so I just wanted to clarify. Even off-line, I worry about saying that right thing, but on a message board, it can be especially hard to be sure you were not misunderstood. Guess that why emoticons were born!

I started thinking maybe people were getting confused because there are more than 50 Miss America contestants, but there are actually 53 of them. I am remembering 52 US states.

I seem to remember 51 states, never 50. BUT, another important thing I remember is there used to be 52 states, but one seceded or was merged, maybe Hawaii? This site is creeping me out right now, Im sure there never were less than 51 states in my lifetime until maybe a year or two ago? I seem to have a lot of other timeshifted memories too :/

i remember 52 states and one was dropped sometime in the past… i thought it was DC ? making it 51..
a couple of years ago i realized it was 50 and I made a point out of remembering that because it freaked me out.

I remember in 5th Grade the female teacher told us the the USA was larger in size than Canada, and I told her it wasn’t and she got angry, and that I should get an Atlas if I didn’t believe her, this was all in the middle of class. Then she just continued with the lesson, but I knew she was wrong.

I personally remember 50 states throughout my lifetime (46 years old, and lived all of that time in the United States). But I find it fascinating how widespread the notion of 52 states apparently is. Although I can imagine ways an individual person might be confused, I can’t come up with a plausible explanation for how so many people might remember it differently (and the same way)..

It especially baffles me that the two “extra” states cited consistently seem to be the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. I guess I could understand miscommunication about D.C., but the really weird one is Puerto Rico. I mean, if it were a mundane explanation, why single out only that one territory (among the several U.S. territories)? Yes, it’s had the strongest push for statehood among the territories, but that wouldn’t explain it being grouped with D.C. (which isn’t a territory, and which I’ve never heard any serious statehood push for).

To make a short story long, it just doesn’t seem explainable to me as some kind of misunderstanding or miscommunication, because there really isn’t any logical reason to mistake both of those areas for states in any sort of linked and widespread way. Weird…

I am with you Derek, I am 41 years old and clearly remember being taught that there are 50 states in America. Hawaii being the 50th state, Alaska the 49th. What are these generations being taught in school? Puerto Rico is considered a territory and not a state yet. That’s maybe where the 51 comes from. I saw this and almost became convinced that I was mistaken!

You’re missing the point of this website. It’s not a generational issue.

This website is about people with alternate memories. We know that some of our memories don’t match the current reality; otherwise, they wouldn’t be worth mentioning.

We know that the U.S.A. has 50 states in this timestream, and that’s what taught in American schools (and most global ones that teach world geography). In most cases, these alternate memories are not an educational issue, per se.

This site is about clear memories that don’t match any current or past reality in this particular timestream. And, it’s about the consistency of those memories, indicating an alternate reality (or realities) where those memories are a match. We are a community of people who share one or more of those memories, and compare them here via articles and comments.

But couldn’t this be a case of a generational issue? Simply put the recent vote in Puerto Rico in favor of statehood could cause younger individuals to believe that it is in fact a state. Granted that doesn’t explain older individuals remembering 52 states.
In my reality (I’m 31 btw) it’s always been 50 states. The lower 48 plus Alaska and Hawaii. I could see how some could count the latter twice. But, most of the comments have D.C. and Puerto Rico and Guam as possible states. As for D.C. that could be explained by their having votes in Congress and the Electoral College (the latter being talked about in depth every 4 years) causing confusion regarding its status. As for Guam and Puerto Rico as far back as I can remember there have been periods of discussion on whether (mostly when) they would become the 51st and 52nd states.
But I distinctly remember the Berenstein Bears being spelt with an ‘E’ up until early 2010.

Hi. just bumped into this. I’m from Brazil and remember there were always 50 States, Hawaii being the fiftieth – when I was a kid I remember Hawaii FIVE-0 on tv.

President Obama notably said in the last campaign that there were 57 states. Is he from an alternate universe? Hmmm, that might explain a LOT.

I always remembered USA having 51 or 49 states but the funniest part is the way I remembered it, was that it was one away from 50!

I was raised being taught that there were 50 states. I was taught this in a few private schools throughout east Michigan, and a single school in Georgia.

It wasn’t until I moved to Georgia, and it must have been 8-14 years ago that I remember for the first time hearing on television (I believe it was a speech by Bush) where he said there was in fact 52 states and mentioned Puerto Rico. It was a small detail in his speech – he didn’t go into detail, it just happened to be something he said along with his speech.

After this, I remember a few occurrences of people referring to the 52 states in the next 2-4 years. Since then, i’ve heard nothing of it.

dc is a district and puerto rico is a province. im canadian trust me

You have to decide what year you want it to be before you know how many States there are in the US

I was actually wrong about one thing I posted, there are actually only 42 states…I have no idea what I was thinking on that one.

Will, your comments are looking a little odd. Explain why you think there are 42 states in this timestream. Is that a technical point, since Massachusetts is a commonwealth, etc., or are you saying something else?

This is really creeping me out. All my life I was sure there were 51 states (I’m European, the 51st was Hawaii in my opinion). Just a few days ago I read an article mentioning the 50 states. I was confused, looked it up on wikipedia and couldn’t believe my eyes.
I even remember an interview or a speech from George W. Bush saying there were 50 states and the media ripping into him for weeks for getting it wrong. How could i have imagined all that??

I have always thought there were 52 states Hawaii and Alaska making up 51 and 52. Until I lived with an American who corrected this thought. I’m not sure why but this seems like a common misconception in Europe.

I’ve always wondered why this mistake is so common. I thought this could be because people are just getting the number of states wrong and repeating this error to others, or they are getting the number of states mixed up with the territories. However, when I investigated how many territories there are this didn’t quite add up. Even though I know there are only 50 states, 52 still feels right to me. The Mandela Effect seems to offers a reasonable explanation.

I really like the idea that these alternative memories are happenings leaching through from different time streams/universes.
This got me thinking. If there are an infinite number universes with an infinite amount of possibilities, and there is no reason why the time streams in these universes run in sync. Is it feasible to consider that somewhere in the infinite number of universes there is an average universe influenced by the rest? In a constant state of flux at any one point along its own time stream, until the majority of universes have past that point. The inhabitants of such a universe would never be consciously aware of events changing, however may have remnant memories of events before they changed.

For example, Mandela may have died in prison. This is until the majority of universes have played out their version of events. In which the majority of universes had Mandela passing in 2013. The memories of Mandela passing in prison are perhaps remnant memories before the change.

Could this be the universe we inhabit? Could this offer an alternative explanation to the Mandela Effect?
It would be great to hear everyone’s thoughts.

I also know their are 52 states!Ask someone what color is a yield sign. Ask yourself this question before you google it.This will also shock you! Blessed Be, Lisa

I found this article interesting, so I asked my uncle how many states there are in America. Funny! He said, 52. Of course we’re from the Philippines, so I can’t really expect accurate knowledge of a foreign country, but it’s still pretty strange.

I was told originally 50 states…but in late 1990’s or early 2000’s Puerto Rico and a part of or all of Peru was allowed to join. I think this was allowed to happen because of Panama Canal dealings.

I’m Australian and I always thought there were 52 states, until I watched an episode of friends where they try to list all 50. I’m only 17 and probably saw this episode at about 14, and all the time before that I thought there were 52 states.
I vaguely remember thinking there were 50 ‘mainland’ states then Hawaii and Alaska made 52

I have a really vivid memory of learning that there were 52 states in school amd being really confused when my parents told me there were only 50. I asked my sister (9) right now and she said 51 very confidently. We’ve both been raised and schooled entirely in the us.

Canadian, and I’ve grown up saying “America has 51 states, except one of them is a district or something.” I still barely understand what the difference between a territory and a province is so I have no hope of figuring out what a district is.

You have provided an explanation for the idea of 57 states.
We have 50 states and one federal district, called Washington D.C. to distinguish it from the west coast state of Washington.
You reminded me that in some cases, the D.C. is treated as a state even though it is not one. For tax purposes, the IRS considers the D.C. as a state. But wait-the territories are the same for purposes of the IRS. So if there are 6 territories as someone said(even we Americans don’t know things like that) then there are, in a manner of speaking, 57. So maybe that explains Obama’s mistake. Or maybe it’s just because he’s Obama…
That however does nothing to solve all the memories of 51 or 52 states.
This question about the states does not interest me much because for me there have always been 50, and that’s that. But my mind was blown when I learned tonight that Mandela died in 2013. As far as I can recall, I had never heard that until like an hour ago. Until then, he died sometime while I was in school, in the 80’s or 90’s.

Ash from the US here, I always remember it being 50 states, but for some reason when I am asked how many states there are I immediately think of a deck of cards and want to say 52 which I find weird because I shouldn’t combine the two thoughts considering they are different numbers… unless they at one point were the same number (52).

Hey i had commented before I scrolled down the comments , I had said that when i was younger I was often confused about how many states there are and thought there was 52 same as a deck of cards. It wasnt until later in life that I “got it straight” 50 states 52 cards. I am from america and still live there today.

Just a strange/funny tidbit:in the song “F*** the world” by Insane Clown Posse a line is :”F*** all fifty two states”,the song is obviously very raunchy so be careful if you want to listen to it

Whoa, here’s another song with 52 states in the lyrics.

ODB – Shimmy Shimmy Ya

And here’s a few more with 52 states in the lyrics, (All Rap music I think)

Mobb Deep – Baby Baby
Papoose – Salute The Dream
Ma$e – Stay Out Of My Way
Fredro Starr – What If

JM, this is great info. Can you add it to the article about 50/51/52 states: https://mandelaeffect.com/51-52-united-states ? I can edit the content of comments, but I can’t actually move them to other, relevant posts.

Update: I found a plugin that will let me do that, so I’m going to start moving a few recent comments (including this) to their relevant posts.

Me again. I read this alternate memory on another website and it resonated with me. The capital of Tennessee, since 1843, is not what I thought it was. I memorized all the state capitol at the late age of 18. I might not have remembered this one, but I DON’T remember it being what it actually is. Weird.

I think I have the year wrong on the current capital of Tennessee, but anyway, it’s been the capital for over 100 years.

Julia, that’s a good one. At the grammar school I attended, we had at least one annual test where we had to label all US states and their capitals, all major European countries, all major oceans, and all of the continents. So, I didn’t think twice about the capital of Tennessee. When I read your first comment about this, I did a quick double-check… but only “just in case.”

Then, seeing what it really is (not a city that’s spelling used to challenge me, as a kid), I thought, “Oh, they must have changed it recently.” No big deal.

But then I saw your second comment about this, and I’m kind of stunned. I’m going to ask my husband what he thinks the capital of Tennessee is, too; his aunt is from there, and we always look forward to visiting her… just outside what is apparently the real capital of Tennessee.

Some state capitals can seem surprising, like Sacramento (CA) and Augusta (ME). But Tennessee’s…? That one has never surprised me or confused me, until now. Definitely a Mandela Effect moment for me.

Thanks for that find!

Julia, in reply to your “in confidence” question, the answer is no. However, when I asked my husband what he thought the capital of Tennessee was, he said what you did. It was his instant answer and then, when he thought about it, he was pretty sure he was right.

And, since his family roots are deep in TN, and he’s been there often, I’d give his response more credence than mine.

I’m trying to think of a hint to tell you what my answer was, but I can’t think of one that won’t point to it, obviously.

Julia, Your guess (after my hint) was correct. And my husband — always a little skeptical — was kind of taken aback by his apparent error. I didn’t know that about the haunted location, since we haven’t done much ghost hunting in TN, but I may make that a priority next time we visit my husband’s aunt. Thanks!

I saw this thread and thought maybe something was wrong because Pasadena is the Capitol of CA and I haven’t heard of Augusta Maine. I don’t remember Maine’s capitol though. Started with R, I think. I also looked up TN. That one looks right to me. Then I looked up other states to see if they changed.

Oregon’s capitol was Winston. I am not confusing it with South Carolina’s Winston-Salem area either. I just checked and apparently that is now in North Carolina. I just had a Mandela Effect moment there.

And I think I am going to go figure out the capitols of the states in this timestream now. I am so confused.

i always thought it was nashville what city are you all thinking it is only other city i can name in Tennessee is Memphis

I was totally on board with the Berenstein Bears thing, but its always been 50 states. Never once have I ever thought or remembered 52 states, that sounds crazy. Puerto Rico is not a US state, they have been trying but it has not happened yet. I can not believe how many Americans don’t know their own history. This is really kind of upsetting. Sorry guys, its not good if you don’t know such easy history. Is this a younger generation thing? Holy cow!

Holy cow yourself, Adrian.

You’re missing the point of this website. What’s “easy history” for you is the apparent history in this timestream. It sounds like you’ve spent a lot of time in this timestream, except for when you slid to where it’s Berenstein Bears, not Berenstain.

There’s nothing wrong with that.

In your reality, you’ve always had 50 states. I’m old enough to vaguely recall 48, but I have no doubt that some people have been in a timestream with 51 or 52 states. That has to be kind of weird, every time they see a US flag and the number of stars looks wrong.

I believe that most Americans do know their own history… at least the one presented in mainstream history books. It’s kind of insulting when someone thinks we’re stupid or badly educated, or raises facile, generational walls to trivialize what — to me, anyway — is a very cool, intriguing phenomenon.

In fact, I resent it. I’m sympathetic to your views, of course. While the idea of parallel worlds isn’t exactly new — not to physicists, anyway — it can be deeply unsettling to people who’ve never considered this before. I’m sure it’s easier to default to the traditional right/wrong dichotomy, than the possibility that everyone (or nearly everyone) is right.

My late father-in-law hated traveling abroad. To him, they were all “foreigners.” They did things the “wrong” way. He was even miserable in England, convinced that “they” all walked on the “wrong” side of the sidewalk. So, after a certain point, he quit traveling outside the USA. That answer worked for him. He seemed to have a happier life.

Unfortunately, it’s not so easy with the Mandela Effect. Avoiding the intrusion of alternate realities isn’t simple. It may not even be possible. I mean, the reality you fell asleep in last night — the one where you’d put the car keys on the kitchen counter, like always — may not be the reality you woke up in, this morning. In today’s reality, you might always leave the car keys on a hook by the garage door. Finding that could take hours, if your usual reality didn’t even have a hook there.

Personally, I’m pretty happy waking up to a new, better habit, even if it’s disorienting at first. (Or, if I wake up to a not-so-smart habit, at least it’s a case of, “Ooh, isn’t that interesting!” … before I re/install a hook by the garage door and, thereafter, place the car keys there.)

For me, the Mandela Effect makes sense. It reduces the right/wrong conflicts. I like this.

However, it sounds like you’ve had few experiences with the Mandela Effect, so — to you — other memories are “wrong.” I understand that. A site like this must be very upsetting. Even disappointing, if it seems like evidence of deteriorating educational standards.

The answer is simple: Avoid websites like this one. Live a happy, relatively unconflicted life. I mean it. Everyone deserves a happy life.

Also, if the very thought of the Mandela Effect churns up distress, it’s okay to consider us a group of misguided, badly-educated young people.

Just don’t expect us to respond well to comments that seem to miss the point — and the joy — of what we’re exploring here.

We’re having fun. Most of the time, this is wall-to-wall “ooh, shiny!” discoveries.

If it’s not fun for you, play elsewhere. It’s that simple, if you want it to be.


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SOURCE: http://mandelaeffect.com/51-52-united-states/

Categories
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#A picture of the state of alabama \ #Video

#A #picture #of #the #state #of #alabama



A picture of the state of alabama

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The 2019 Alabama Writing Workshop

Get Your Writing Published: March 8, 2019

The 2019 Alabama Writing Workshop: March 8, 2019

After successful events in 2016 and 2017, Writing Day Workshops is excited to announce The 2019 Alabama Writing Workshop — a full-day “How to Get Published” writing event in Birmingham, AL on Friday, March 8, 2019.

This writing event is a wonderful opportunity to get intense instruction over the course of one day, pitch a literary agent or editor (optional), get your questions answered, and more. Note that there are limited seats at the event (150 total). All questions about the event regarding schedule, details and registration are answered below. Thank you for your interest in the 2019 Alabama Writing Workshop!

WHAT IS IT?

This is a special one-day “How to Get Published” writing workshop on Friday, March 8, 2019, at the Embassy Suites by Hilton Birmingham (near the Birmingham Zoo). In other words, it’s one day full of classes and advice designed to give you the best instruction concerning how to get your writing & books published. We’ll discuss your publishing opportunities today, how to write queries & pitches, how to market yourself and your books, what makes an agent/editor stop reading your manuscript, and more. No matter what you’re writing — fiction or nonfiction — the day’s classes will help point you in the right direction. Writers of all genres are welcome.

This event is designed to squeeze as much into one day of learning as possible. You can ask any questions you like during the classes, and get your specific concerns addressed. We will have literary agents onsite to give feedback and take pitches from writers, as well. This year’s faculty includes the following:

  • literary agent Caroline George (C.Y.L.E. Literary Elite)
  • literary agent Nikki Terpilowski (Holloway Literary)
  • literary agent Alexis Sattler (HSG Agency)
  • literary agent Weronika Janczuk (D4E0 Literary)
  • literary agent Sandra O’Donnell (RO Literary)
  • literary agent Moe Ferrara (BookEnds Literary)
  • literary agent Hannah Whatley (C.Y.L.E. Literary Elite)
  • literary agent Susan Velazquez (JABberwocky Literary)
  • editor Mike Parker (Wordcrafts Press)
  • and possibly more to come.

By the end of the day, you will have all the tools you need to move forward on your writing journey. This independent event is organized by coordinator Jessica Bell of Writing Day Workshops, with help from the Alabama Writers Conclave .

THIS YEAR’S PRESENTER/INSTRUCTOR

Brian A. Klems (@BrianKlems) is the former online editor of WritersDigest.com. His blog during his tenure there, The Writer’s Dig —which covered everything writing and publishing—was one of the largest blogs in the writing community. Brian’s first book, Oh Boy, You’re Having a Girl: A Dad’s Guide to Raising Daughters (Adams Media) was released in April 2013. It received high-level buzz and praise from some of the funniest writers alive, including Dave Barry and Bruce Cameron. Brian is also a proud graduate of the Ohio University E.W. Scripps School of Journalism, a husband, softball infielder, perennial fantasy sports underachiever, and father of three lovely little girls.

EVENT LOCATION & DETAILS

9:30 a.m. – 5 p.m., Friday, March 8, 2019: Embassy Suites by Hilton Birmingham, 2300 Woodcrest Pl, Birmingham, AL 35209. (205)879-7400.

WORKSHOP SCHEDULE & INSTRUCTORS (MARCH 8, 2019)

9 – 9:30: Check-in and registration at the event location.

9:30 – 10:30: “A Bird’s-eye View Publishing & Books in the Year 2019.” This workshop is quick & easy overview of the publishing industry today, and how it’s changing. The speech is designed to educate writers and help them understand what publishing options exist for them today and why it’s an exciting time to be a writer.

10:30 – 11:45: “Tips on How to Write Like the Pros.” This workshop is a thorough crash course concerning craft, style and voice. We’ll discuss nuts & bolts tips for sentence construction like how to avoid passive tense, how to use vivid language, how to self-edit your own work, how to make your characters memorable, the art of compelling dialogue, and much more.

11:45 – 1:15: Lunch on your own. There are several restaurants within quick driving distance on the block.

1:15 – 2:30: “Writers’ Got Talent: A Page One Critique-Fest.” In the vein of American Idol or America’s Got Talent, this is a chance to get your first page read (anonymously — no bylines given) with our 4 attending agents commenting on what was liked or not liked about the submission. Get expert feedback on your incredibly important first page, and know if your writing has what it needs to keep readers’ attention. (All attendees are welcome to bring pages to the event for this session, and we will choose pages at random for the workshop for as long as time lasts.)

2:50 – 4:00: “25 Questions You Need Answered Before You Seek an Agent or Self-Publish Your Book.” Before you publish your work or query an agent, there are plenty of things you need to know — such as how to submit to agents properly, how to find the best self-publishing service for your need, what social media channels you should be on already, how to launch your book right, how to draft a compelling query/pitch and synopsis, how to find other writers who can help you, and much more.

4:00 – 5:00: “25 Questions You Need Answered After You Seek an Agent or Self-Publish Your Book.” After you self-publish your work or get a traditional publishing book deal, there are plenty of things you need to know — such as how to promote yourself, how to keep your career going with multiple books, how you cross between the words of self-publishing and traditional publishing (i.e., use them both) to make the most money, how to build a readership, and much more.

All throughout the day: Agent & Editor Pitching.

PITCH AN AGENT!

Caroline George [SOLD OUT OF PITCH APPOINTMENTS] is a literary agent with C.Y.L.E. Literary Elite. She is a generalist, and seeks many genres of fiction, including: picture books, middle grade contemporary, middle grade sci-fi/fantasy, YA contemporary, YA sci-fi/fantasy, historical, women’s, mystery, thriller, romance, adult science fiction and fantasy, Christian/inspirational fiction, horror literary fiction, and mainstream fiction. Regarding nonfiction, she likes memoir, inspirational, self-help, and socially relevant titles. Learn more about Caroline here .

Nikki Terpilowski is a literary agent and founder of Holloway Literary. She seeks Southern fiction, historical fiction, young adult, women’s fiction, literary fiction, mysteries, thrillers, romance (contemporary, historical and romantic suspense), cozy mysteries, science fiction (including Afrofuturist fiction), and African-American fiction of all types. For nonfiction, she seeks books related to mindfulness, healthy eating (Paleo, gluten-free, etc.), regional/ethnic/fusion cookbooks, foodie subjects, travel, alternative simple living, i.e. homesteading, minimalism, etc, interesting self-help (personal and professional), military experiences, Civil War, and Southern living. Learn more about Nikki here .

Weronika Janczuk [SOLD OUT OF PITCH APPOINTMENTS] is a literary agent with D4E0 Literary. “I am not, and have never been, a single-genre reader. I am eager only for the best-told stories, building out a list of talented novelists and writers in many genres.” She is seeking: young adult, fantasy & sci-fi, literary fiction, commercial fiction, women’s fiction, romance crime, mystery & thrillers. memoir and nonfiction (innovative ideas & research; projects with a potential for social & cultural impact, etc.). Learn more about Weronika here .

Alexis Sattler is a literary agent with HSG Agency. Alexis reads across genre with a particular eye toward literary fiction, contemporary family sagas, science fiction, fantasy, magical realism, mysteries, and historical fiction. She is also open to idea-driven nonfiction in the spaces of science, technology, history, politics, cultural criticism, and narrative journalism. An avid armchair traveler, she looks for works that explore unique clashes of culture and believes deeply in the power of world-building. Learn more about Alexis here .

Moe Ferrara is a literary agent with BookEnds Literary Agency. Moe is interested in books for middle grade, young adult, and adult readers in most genres–especially science fiction, fantasy, contemporary, and light horror. The right contemporary or paranormal romance (sans-vampires of course) will spark her interest. Learn more about Moe here .

Sandra O’Donnell, Ph.D. is a literary agent & founding partner of RO Literary. In fiction, she’s looking for stories with compelling characters that jump off the page — historical fiction, courtroom dramas, upmarket fiction and historically-based conspiracy thrillers that keep her up all night. For nonfiction, she seeks narrative nonfiction, memoir, cultural studies, popular culture, history, and religion/spiritual. Learn more about Sandra here .

Hannah Whatley is a literary agent with C.Y.L.E. Literary Elite. She is seeking: poetry collections, children’s (picture books, early readers, chapter books), young adult (fantasy, contemporary, romance), literary fiction, and nonfiction on wellness and self-development. Looking for diversity of characters in fiction. (Please do not send her individual poems.) She is open to both secular/general and Christian submissions. Learn more about Hannah here .

Mike Parker is the publisher and acquiring editor for Wordcrafts Press. Mike is actively seeking adult, young adult, and middle grade fiction in the following genres: contemporary, literary, historical, Biblical, fantasy, science fiction, paranormal, horror, sweet romance, mystery, and thriller. Mike seeks nonfiction in the following categories: pop culture, technology, sports, memoir, history, inspirational, and faith-based. Mike is actively seeking stage plays in any genre, but is particularly interested in scripts offering strong roles for females. Learn more about Mike here .

Susan Velazquez is a literary agent with JABberwocky Literary Agency. Susan is looking for fantasy, science fiction (preferably speculative/near-future), literary/upmarket fiction, narrative non-fiction, women’s fiction, historical fiction, and YA. Learn more about Susan here .

More 2019 agents may be added.

These one-on-one meetings are an amazing chance to pitch your book face-to-face with an agent, and get personal, individual feedback on your pitch/concept. If the agent likes your pitch, they’ll request to see part/all of your book — sending you straight past the slush pile. It also gives you an intimate chance to meet with an agent and pick their brain with any questions on your mind.

(Please note that Agent/Editor Pitching is an add-on, separate aspect of the day, for only those who sign up. Spaces are limited for these premium meetings, and pricing/detail is explained below.)

PRICING

$169 — EARLY BIRD registration pricing! This is the complete base price for registration to the 2019 AWW and access to all workshops, all day.

Add $29 — to secure a 10-minute one-on-one meeting with any of our literary agents in attendance. Use this special meeting as a chance to pitch your work and get professional feedback on your pitch. (Spaces limited.) If they wish, attendees are free to sign up for multiple 10-minute pitch sessions at $29/session — pitching multiple individuals, or securing 20 minutes to pitch one person rather than the usual 10. Here are four quick testimonials regarding writers who have signed with literary agents after pitching them at prior Writing Day Workshops events. (Our bigger, growing list of success stories can be seen here .)

“I met my client, Alison Hammer, at the 2017 Writing
Workshop of Chicago and just sold her book.”
– literary agent Joanna Mackenzie of Nelson Literary

“Good news! I signed a client [novelist Aliza Mann]
from the 2017 Michigan Writing Workshop!”
– literary agent Sara Mebigow of KT Literary

“I signed author Stephanie Wright from
the 2018 Seattle Writing Workshop.”
– literary agent Kathleen Ortiz of New Leaf Literary

“I signed an author [Kate Thompson] that I
met at the 2017 Philadelphia Writing Workshop.”
– literary agent Kimberly Brower of Brower Literary

“I signed novelist Kathleen McInnis after meeting her
at the 2016 Chesapeake Writing Workshop.”

– literary agent Adriann Ranta of Foundry Literary + Media

Add $69 — for an in-depth, personal critique of your one-page query letter from instructor Chuck Sambuchino, who previously taught at this Alabama workshop. (This rate is a special event value for Alabama Writing Workshop attendees only.) Registrants are encouraged to take advantage of the specially-priced critique, so they can send out their query letter with confidence following the workshop. Also, if you are meeting with an agent at the event, you’re essentially speaking your query letter aloud to them. Wouldn’t it be wise to give that query letter (i.e., your pitch) one great edit before that meeting?

Add $89 — for an in-depth personal critique of the first 10 pages of your novel. Spaces with faculty for these critiques are very limited, and participating attendees get an in-person meeting at the workshop. Options:

  • Young adult, middle grade, literary fiction, mainstream fiction, women’s fiction, fantasy: Faculty member Allison Mackey, a published author, will get your work in advance, edit the first 10 double-spaced pages of your story, meet with you for 10 minutes at the workshop to discuss her thoughts, and pass along written critique notes at the meeting. Allison has written multiple children’s stories on a contract basis with Tiny Readers Publishing in Houston, and she has authored several nonfiction/educational books for young ESL readers in Norway. Learn more about her here .
  • Memoir, young adult, historical fiction, fantasy, science fiction, literary fiction, mainstream fiction, Southern fiction: Faculty member Chandra Sparks Splond, a published author, will get your work in advance, edit the first 10 double-spaced pages of your story, meet with you for 10 minutes at the workshop to discuss her thoughts, and pass along written critique notes at the meeting. Chandra is an editor, speaker and award-winning author and blogger. Her YA novel Make It Work was named Alabama’s Great Read 2017, Spin It Like That was chosen as a Popular Paperback for Young Adults by the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), and The Pledge was a YALSA Quick Pick for Reluctant Readers. Learn more at her website .
  • Southern fiction, literary fiction, mainstream/upmarket fiction, women’s fiction : Faculty member Lorna Hollifield, a published Southern fiction author, will get your work in advance and edit the first 10 double-spaced pages of your story. Lorna is the author of the upmarket Southern fiction novel, Tobacco Sun, and is represented by Kimberly Whalen of Whalen Literary. She is a former officer with the South Carolina Writers Association. Unlike some other critiquers listed here, Lorna will not be at the Birmingham event to meet with writers personally. Instead, she will be available for 10-minute Skype meetings (along with an e-mailed written critique) for each attendee submission. Learn more about Lorna at her website .
  • Children’s picture books : Faculty member Shannon Anderson, a published children’s picture book author, will get your picture book in advance and critique the work. 1,000 words, maximum; submissions can include illustrations or not. Shannon is an award-winning children’s book author, teacher, and national speaker. As the Regional Advisor for the Indiana Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators, she loves to help aspiring and published authors on the path to publication. Unlike some other critiquers listed here, Shannon will not be at the Birmingham event to meet with writers personally. Instead, she will be available for 10-minute Skype meetings (along with an e-mailed written critique) for each attendee submission. You can learn more about her at her website .

How to pay/register — Registration is now open. Reach out to workshop organizer Kerrie Flanagan via email: [email protected] , and she will provide specific instructions for payment and registration to get you a reserved seat at the event. Payment is by either PayPal or check. Because Kerrie plans different workshops, make sure you note that you’re inquiring about the Alabama workshop specifically.

REGISTRATION

Because of limited space at the venue of Embassy Suites by Hilton Birmingham, the workshop can only allow 150 registrants, unless spacing issues change. For this reason, we encourage you to book sooner rather than later.

Are spaces still available? Yes, we still have spaces available. We will announce RIGHT HERE, at this point on this web page, when all spaces are taken. If you do not see a note right here saying how all spaces are booked, then yes , we still have room, and you are encouraged to register.

How to Register : The easy first step is simply to reach out to workshop organizer Kerrie Flanagan via email: [email protected] . She will pass along registration information to you, and give instructions on how to pay by PayPal or check. Once payment is complete, you will have a reserved seat at the event. The AWW will send out periodic e-mail updates to all registered attendees with any & all news about the event. Because Kerrie plans different workshops, make sure you note that you’re inquiring about the Alabama workshop specifically.

Refunds : If you sign up for the event and have to cancel for any reason, you will receive 50% of your total payment back [sent by check or PayPal]. The other 50% is nonrefundable and will not be returned, and helps the workshop ensure that only those truly interested in the limited spacing sign up for the event. (Please note that query editing payments are completely non-refundable if the instructor has already edited your letter.)

Thank you for your interest in the 2019 Alabama Writing Workshop.


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SOURCE: http://alabamawritingworkshop.com/

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How do the Utah Jazz get to the next level? SLC Dunk – Video

#The #utah #jazz

How do the Utah Jazz get to the next level? SLC Dunk - Video, REMMONT.COM

The utah jazz

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How do the Utah Jazz get to the next level?

What needs to be done to become a legitimate contender?

Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images

In measured music, the downbeat is the first impulse that can be heard in the beginning. It is the strongest part of the rhythm. At SLC Dunk, The Downbeat is the first story of the weekday. It’s to jump start your Jazz fandom before work, school, or a long day watching the kids.

It’s been a week since the Utah Jazz season ended in Houston. After seven days worth of thinking about the 2018-19 season, there’s a lot on my mind. The way the season ended, how it ended, why it ended, etc. What were the best things about this past season? What were the worst? What could have gone better? What went better than expected? It takes time to digest a full season’s worth of questions and reactions, but more there’s one thing more than anything else that is stuck in my mind: how do the Utah Jazz get to the next level?

It’s clear that the Jazz have been, and are, a good, above-average NBA team. Over the past three seasons they have racked up 149 wins, which is 6th most in the league. Only the Warriors, Rockets, Raptors, Celtics and Spurs have more wins over that span. They’ve been a top team defensively over the past three seasons, always residing towards the top of NBA defensive rating metrics, as well as being in the top 10 in net rating. They’ve made the playoffs 3/3 of the last three years, advancing through the first round in two out of the three postseasons while beating some pretty star-studded teams. They have won or been in the running for several personal NBA accolades over that stretch including Defensive Player of the Year, Rookie of the Year, and Coach of the Year. It’s pretty safe to say that the Jazz over the past three years have been pretty dang successful.

With all of that being said, it’s 100 percent clear what the overall goal and dream of this Utah Jazz franchise is; bring a championship to Salt Lake City. Gail Miller has said it. Rudy Gobert has said it. Donovan Mitchell has said it. Ever since Stockton and Malone fell to the mighty sword of Michael Jordan twice in the late 90’s, there’s nothing more that the collective people of Utah and Jazz fans everywhere want, than to avenge those losses and hoist the trophy on a parade float through the streets of Salt Lake City.

Since those heartbreaking losses in the NBA Finals, the Jazz have really only been close to contention twice in a 20-year span. The Deron Williams-Carlos Boozer era saw a team that won 50+ games in three out of four years, including reaching the Western Conference finals in 2007. Losing to the Spurs in five games was as far as that team would go.

Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

After that team was blown up by ego and pride, the Jazz fell into their first losing trance since the franchise moved to Utah, missing the playoffs five out of six years. The Jazz have now returned to their winning ways. With one of the most dynamic young stars in Donovan Mitchell, and probable back-to-back DPOY Rudy Gobert, the Jazz are closer to contention than they have been in the last decade.

But how close are they? Their last three playoff eliminations have come in 0-4, 1-4, 1-4 sets at the hands of the two best teams in the NBA over a three-year span. That, to me, shows the harsh reality of how close the Utah Jazz really are to contending with the top dogs.

So how do they get there? How do they get to that next level? They are close, but it seems like it’s still so far away. Looking at things under the simple scope, there’s really only two ways that your team gets better. Either your current players get better, or you get new players. It’s pretty simple. Looking at the first option, whom on the current Jazz roster can get better in such a way that it improves the team and their odds at contention? The first guy this falls on is going to be Donovan Mitchell. Fair or not, the Jazz are going to ride on his shoulders as long as he is here. That’s just how it is with star players, the types of guys that franchise are built around. If Donovan Mitchell came out next season and averaged 28 points per game and improved his efficiency, the odds that the Jazz would be better-suited for contention are immediately increased. The same applies for Rudy Gobert. So much will depend on these two as the cornerstones of this team. But like we saw so much throughout the year, these guys need help. So what other role players can be better next season? Can the Jazz get enough out of guys like Royce O’Neale, Georges Niang, Jae Crowder, etc to really take them to the next level? The lack of a third guy is really what hurt the Jazz during the season, and it was magnified during the Rockets series. The Jazz did not get any improvement out of Joe Ingles or Ricky Rubio, which made things difficult because both of these two mean so much to the success of the team.

The other option at getting to the next level: getting new players. There has been a lot of talk already in the past week about free-agency and trades. Guys names that keep coming up in conversations seem to include Tobias Harris, Kemba Walker, Khris Middleton, and more. These are all obviously pretty high-profile targets, but it’s probably going to take one of these guys, or someone similar, to take the Jazz to the next level.

Dennis Lindsey has a lot on his plate going into this off-season. He’s the one that will ultimately decide if the Jazz trust their current players development, or seek reinforcements through free agency or trades. It’s going to hurt like crazy to see this core group of Jazz players get broken up. If it does happen, it’s going to be hard to swallow. But it’s hopefully in sacrifice of something better and some increased hope at bringing that championship to Utah. The next coming months are going to be some of the most important months of Dennis Lindsey’s tenure as GM, and we will truly see if the Jazz can indeed, take it to the next level.

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SOURCE: http://www.slcdunk.com/the-downbeat-latest-jazz-news/2019/5/2/18526818/utah-jazz-next-level-nba-2019-offseason-donovan-mitchell-rudy-gobert

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Where is arizona on the us map @ Video

#Reference #Maps #of #Arizona, #USA #- #Nations #Online #Project



Where is arizona on the us map

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___ Reference Maps of Arizona

About Arizona

Time zone: Mountain
UTC −7
Arizona doesn’t observe daylight saving time apart from the Navajo Nation


Where in the United States is Arizona? Location map of Arizona in the US.

Arizona is a landlocked US state situated in the southwestern United States, north of Mexico.

The state is bordered by Utah to the north, by New Mexico to the east, to the south by the states of Sonora and Baja California (Mexico), and to the west by California and Nevada.

Short History
The area was colonized by Spain in 1598. Arizona was part of New Spain until 1821, and then part of the short-lived Mexican Empire which became the United Mexican States. In 1846 United States forces invaded and occupied the region then known as New Mexico.

Topographic Map of Arizona. (Click the map to enlarge)

The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ended the war between the United States and Mexico in 1848. In 1850 New Mexico became a US territory. In the Gadsden Purchase of 1854, the US pays Mexico $10 million for 76,845 km² (29,670 sq mi) of Mexican territory that becomes part of Arizona and New Mexico.

The area was organized as a US territory in 1863 from lands ceded by the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848. Copper was discovered in 1854, and copper mining was Arizona’s chief industry until the 1950s.
Arizona was the 48th state and the last of the contiguous states to be admitted to the Union on 14th February 1912.

Area
Arizona occupies an area of 295,234 km² (113,990 sq mi) [1] , compared Arizona would fit into Texas about 2.4 times, the state is slightly smaller than Italy (301,318 km²) or the Philippines (300,000 km²).

Highlights of Arizona’s Landscape


Sonoran Desert at Saguaro National Park
Image: Joe Parks

Arizona is known for its desert landscape in the southern half.
The Colorado Plateau in the northern part of the state is largely made up of high desert, with scattered areas of forests. Part of the plateau is the Painted Desert and the Petrified Forest National Park.

On the Arizona-Utah state line there is Monument Valley with its well known sandstone buttes, the tallest reaching 300 m (1,000 ft) above the valley floor. The valley has been featured in many movies, especially Western movies.

Highest Elevation
Humphreys Peak is the highest natural point in the state with 3,852 m (12,637 ft) located within the Kachina Peaks Wilderness about 18 km (11 miles) north of Flagstaff.

Major Rivers


Horseshoe Bend of the Colorado River near the town of Page in Arizona,
Image: Paul Hermans

Major Rivers in Colorado are, the Colorado River, one of the principal rivers of the Southwestern United States, the Little Colorado River, a tributary of the Colorado which provides the principal drainage from the Painted Desert region, and the Gila River, another major tributary of the Colorado River; the Salt River is the largest tributary of the Gila River; the Verde River is a major tributary of the Salt River; the Santa Cruz River in southern Arizona and northern Sonora in Mexico is another major tributary of the Gila River; the Puerco River in northeastern Arizona drains an arid terrain, including parts of the Painted Desert. The Virgin River, a tributary of the Colorado forms the north arm of Lake Mead. The source of the San Francisco River is near Alpine, Arizona, it flows later into the upper Gila River. The San Pedro River in southern Arizona is also a tributary of the Gila River.

Climate
Arizona has a dry desert climate with very hot summers and temperate winters.

World Heritage Site


Desert View Watchtower. The 21 m high stone building is located on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. The four-story tower was designed by American architect Mary Colter and completed in 1932. The interior contains murals by Fred Kabotie. The upper floors serve as an observation deck from which visitors can view eastern portions of the Grand Canyon.
Image: Vladsinger

Arizona has one UNESCO World Heritage Site. In the north western part of the state is one of America’s best known natural landmarks, the Grand Canyon. It is quite certainly the most spectacular gorge on this planet.

The steep-sided canyons of layered bands of red rock is formed by the Colorado River and its tributaries over a period of the past 2 billion years. The canyon is 446 km (277 mi) long, and up to 29 km (18 mi) wide, and in places over 1,500 m (nearly 1 mile) deep.

Grand Canyon National Park is one of 23 UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the US.


The Grand Canyon, view from the South Rim.
Image: Roger Bolsius

Population


Rendered image of Arizona’s State Capitol in Phoenix. The original Classical Revival building was the seat of Arizona’s Territorial government, until Arizona became a state in 1912. The 1901 portion of the Capitol is now maintained as the Arizona Capitol Museum.
Image: Google

The Grand Canyon State (Arizona’s nickname) has a population of 7 million (2017 est.) [2] ; capital and largest city is Phoenix, second-largest city is Tucson with more than half a million people, largest metro area is Phoenix Metropolitan Area (pop. 4.2 million).

Other major cities (pop. more than 200,000) are Mesa, Chandler, Glendale, Scottsdale, and Gilbert.

Busiest airport is Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (IATA code: PHX).

The detailed map below shows the US state of Arizona with boundaries, the location of the state capital Phoenix, major cities and populated places, streams and lakes, interstate highways, principal highways, and railroads.

Cities in Arizona


Aerial view of Arizona’s capital Phoenix with Piestewa Peak in background, the second highest peak in the Phoenix Mountains.
Image: Melikamp

Map shows the location of following cities and towns in Arizona:

Major cities are: Phoenix, Tucson, Scottsdale, Tempe, Mesa, Glendale.

Other cities and towns in Arizona:
Ajo, Alpine, Ash Fork, Benson, Bisbee, Buckeye, Bullhead City, Camp Verde, Casa Grande, Chandler, Chinle, Clifton, Colorado City, Cottonwood, Douglas, Eagar, Eloy, Flagstaff, Florence, Gila Bend, Globe, Grand Canyon, Green Valley, Holbrook, Kayenta, Kingman, Lake Havasu City, Lukeville, Marana, Miami, Nogales, Oro Valley, Page, Parker, Payson, Peach Springs, Polacca, Prescott, Quartzite, Safford, San Luis, Sedona, Sells, Show Low, Sierra Vista, Snowflake, St Johns, Superior, Tombstone, Tuba City, Wickenburg, Willcox, Williams, Window Rock (Capital of Navajo Nation), Winslow, and Yuma.


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SOURCE: http://www.nationsonline.org/oneworld/map/USA/arizona_map.htm

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#Where is tennessee located in the us * #Video

#Where #is #tennessee #located #in #the #us



Where is tennessee located in the us

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Tennessee became the 16th state of the union in 1796. It is just 112 miles wide, but stretches 432 miles from the Appalachian Mountains boundary with North Carolina in the east to the Mississippi River borders with Missouri and Arkansas in the west. Tennessee’s two largest cities, Memphis and Nashville, are known as centers of blues and country music, respectively,and have played host tothe likes ofElvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Muddy Waters, Johnny Cash, B.B. King and Dolly Parton. Memphis is also famous for its barbecue and hosts the well-attended “Memphis in May” barbecue competition each year.

Date of Statehood: June 1, 1796

Capital: Nashville

Population: 6,346,105 (2010)

Size: 42,144 square miles

Nickname(s): Volunteer State; Big Bend State; Hog and Hominey State

Motto: Agriculture and Commerce

Tree: Tulip Poplar

Flower: Iris

Bird: Mockingbird

Interesting Facts

  • In 1878, a yellow fever epidemic swept through Memphis, claiming the lives of around 5,000 people. Although many neighboring towns and cities throughout the South established quarantines to prevent the disease from spreading, a majority of residents fled Memphis after news of the outbreak was first reported. The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville began as a live music show called the “WSM Barn Dance” by announcer George Hay in 1925. One of the state’s most popular tourist attractions, it is also the longest-running radio show in U.S. history. Twenty-four-year-old John Scopes was arrested and put on trial in 1925 for violating Tennessee state law by teaching Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution as part of his public high school curriculum. The “monkey trial,” as it became known, garnered national attention and publicized scientific evidence for evolution, but resulted in a guilty verdict for Scopes, who was fined $100. It was not until 1968 that the Supreme Court asserted that any law banning the teaching of evolution in public schools was unconstitutional. In 1947, the Tennessee legislature adopted the tulip poplar as the state tree in recognition of its widespread use by 18th and 19th century pioneers in the construction of their homes and farms.
  • Future President Andrew Jackson founded the city of Memphis on May 22, 1819, along with John Overton and James Winchester. They named it after the ancient Egyptian city of Memphis—meaning “place of good abode”—which was located at the head of the Nile River Delta.
  • William Strickland, the engineer and architect of the Tennessee State Capitol in Nashville, died in 1854 during the building’s construction. At his request, he was entombed within the structure’s walls.
  • Great Smoky Mountains National Park is America’s most visited national park, attracting more than 9.4 million people in 2010. Known as the “Salamander Capital of the World,” the park hosts the most diverse population of salamanders in the world: 30 different species.
  • Memphis, Tennessee, is home to Graceland, Elvis Presley’s former estate. It is one of the most visited private residences in America–second only to the White House.

PHOTO GALLERIES

Nashville (seen here along the Cumberland River in 2006) is Tennessee’s state capital and its second to Memphis as its largest city.

” data-full-height=”1333″ data-full-src=”https://www.history.com/.image/c_limit%2Ccs_srgb%2Cfl_progressive%2Ch_2000%2Cq_auto:good%2Cw_2000/MTU3ODc5MDgyMTM3ODg4NDc5/cumberland-river-and-nashville-skyline.jpg” data-full-width=”2000″ data-image-id=”ci0230e630c03c26df” data-image-slug=”Cumberland River And Nashville Skyline” data-public-id=”MTU3ODc5MDgyMTM3ODg4NDc5″ data-source-name=”Richard Cummins/Corbis” data-title=”Cumberland River And Nashville Skyline”>

A musician stands holding his guitar outside Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge, a country music bar. Nashville is known as “Music City.” Many country music legends have performed at the famous Grand Ole Opry.

” data-full-height=”2000″ data-full-src=”https://www.history.com/.image/c_limit%2Ccs_srgb%2Cfl_progressive%2Ch_2000%2Cq_auto:good%2Cw_2000/MTU3ODc5MDgyMTM4MTUwNjIz/musician-outside-lounge-in-nashville.jpg” data-full-width=”1332″ data-image-id=”ci0230e630f00b26df” data-image-slug=”Musician Outside Lounge In Nashville” data-public-id=”MTU3ODc5MDgyMTM4MTUwNjIz” data-source-name=”Catherine Karnow/CORBIS” data-title=”Musician Outside Lounge In Nashville”>

While Nashville is known as “Music City” Memphis has a rich musical history of its own as the home of both Sun and Stax Records.

” data-full-height=”1331″ data-full-src=”https://www.history.com/.image/c_limit%2Ccs_srgb%2Cfl_progressive%2Ch_2000%2Cq_auto:good%2Cw_2000/MTU3ODc5MDgyNjcwNDM0MDE1/stax-museum-of-american-soul-music-memphis-tennessee-usa.jpg” data-full-width=”2000″ data-image-id=”ci0230e631d00026df” data-image-slug=”Stax Museum Of American Soul Music Memphis Tennessee Usa” data-public-id=”MTU3ODc5MDgyNjcwNDM0MDE1″ data-source-name=”Walter Bibikow/JAI/Corbis” data-title=”Stax Museum Of American Soul Music Memphis Tennessee Usa”>

With hits many clubs, Beale Street is is a popular destination for lovers of live music.

” data-full-height=”1331″ data-full-src=”https://www.history.com/.image/c_limit%2Ccs_srgb%2Cfl_progressive%2Ch_2000%2Cq_auto:good%2Cw_2000/MTU3ODc5MDgyMTQwMzc4ODQ3/beale-street-entertainment-area-memphis-tennessee-usa-2.jpg” data-full-width=”2000″ data-image-id=”ci0230e630b00b26df” data-image-slug=”Beale Street Entertainment Area Memphis Tennessee Usa 2″ data-public-id=”MTU3ODc5MDgyMTQwMzc4ODQ3″ data-source-name=”Walter Bibikow/JAI/Corbis” data-title=”Beale Street Entertainment Area Memphis Tennessee Usa 2″>

Graceland was the home of the “King of Rock N’ Roll,” Elvis Presley. Daughter Lisa Marie sold the management of the estate to an entertainment company in 2005.

” data-full-height=”1342″ data-full-src=”https://www.history.com/.image/c_limit%2Ccs_srgb%2Cfl_progressive%2Ch_2000%2Cq_auto:good%2Cw_2000/MTU3ODc5MDgyMTM2NDQ2Njg3/graceland-mansion.jpg” data-full-width=”2000″ data-image-id=”ci0230e630907826df” data-image-slug=”Graceland Mansion” data-public-id=”MTU3ODc5MDgyMTM2NDQ2Njg3″ data-source-name=”Alison Wright/Corbis” data-title=”Graceland Mansion”>

A billboard directs tourists to the information center at Dollywood, an amusement park built by country music singer Dolly Parton. Pigeon Forge, Tennessee.

” data-full-height=”1315″ data-full-src=”https://www.history.com/.image/c_limit%2Ccs_srgb%2Cfl_progressive%2Ch_2000%2Cq_auto:good%2Cw_2000/MTU3ODc5MDgyNDAyODUwNTI3/dollywood-billboard-in-tennessee.jpg” data-full-width=”2000″ data-image-id=”ci0230e631206a26df” data-image-slug=”Dollywood Billboard In Tennessee” data-public-id=”MTU3ODc5MDgyNDAyODUwNTI3″ data-source-name=”Pat O’Hara/CORBIS” data-title=”Dollywood Billboard In Tennessee”>

A view of the majestic beauty that typifies the Great Smoky Mountains from the road along Clingman’s Dome, the park’s highest elevation at 6643 feet.

” data-full-height=”1332″ data-full-src=”https://www.history.com/.image/c_limit%2Ccs_srgb%2Cfl_progressive%2Ch_2000%2Cq_auto:good%2Cw_2000/MTU3ODc5MDgyNDAzNzAyNDk1/fog-on-clingmans-dome-in-the-great-smoky-mountains.jpg” data-full-width=”2000″ data-image-id=”ci0230e631100826df” data-image-slug=”Fog On Clingmans Dome In The Great Smoky Mountains” data-public-id=”MTU3ODc5MDgyNDAzNzAyNDk1″ data-source-name=”Gerd Ludwig/Corbis” data-title=”Fog On Clingmans Dome In The Great Smoky Mountains”>

Grave stones line Shiloh Military National Park. The park commemorates the Civil War Battle of Shiloh which took place took place in 1862 and resulted in over 20,000 dead.

” data-full-height=”1328″ data-full-src=”https://www.history.com/.image/c_limit%2Ccs_srgb%2Cfl_progressive%2Ch_2000%2Cq_auto:good%2Cw_2000/MTU3ODc5MDgyMTM0MjE4NDYz/civil-war-cemetery.jpg” data-full-width=”2000″ data-image-id=”ci0230e630806526df” data-image-slug=”Civil War Cemetery” data-public-id=”MTU3ODc5MDgyMTM0MjE4NDYz” data-source-name=”Buddy Mays/CORBIS” data-title=”Civil War Cemetery”>

Kevin Dyson is tackled on the one yard line as time runs out in Super Bowl XXXIV resulting in one of the most exciting finishes in the game’s history. Tennessee lost to the Rams 23-16.


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SOURCE: http://www.history.com/topics/us-states/tennessee

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#Where’s tennessee on the map $ #Video

#Where’s #tennessee #on #the #map



Where’s tennessee on the map

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The Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto first visited the Tennessee area in 1540, and quickly claimed the land for Spain. This uninvited intrusion into the ancestral homeland of Native Americans would eventually prove disastrous for the Cherokee Indians and other indigenous tribes.

In their continuing search for gold and silver in the Americas, Spanish expeditions returned again and again, but they searched in vain for treasure. By the middle of the 17th century, after French and English explorations, both nations claimed this land as their own.

As European settlers from the original thirteen colonies gradually spread west, small communities were established in the northeast, along the North Carolina border. As a few hundred hardy pioneers reached the area now called Nashville, Indians were being summarily squeezed out of what was rightfully theirs, and they would eventually be forced to move further south and west just to survive.

During the French and Indian Wars (1754-1763), Great Britain defeated France and their Native American allies, thus taking control of a vast area of North America, including present day Tennessee. As the American Revolutionary War played out across the eastern colonies, west of the Appalachian Mountains, colonists against Native Americans, the British, and their loyalist supporters fought that war.

In 1780, at the Battle of King’s Mountain in North Carolina, Tennessee militiamen overwhelmed the loyalist militia led by British Major Patrick Ferguson, and helped turn the tide of the Revolution War in the South. At war’s end, hundreds of Revolutionary War veterans and their families streamed backed into Tennessee.

In the late 1780’s, a few counties in western North Carolina broke off and formed the State of Franklin. This fractured area tried to join the Union, but failed. Eventually North Carolina, after joining the Union, ceded that land to the federal government in 1790, after which it was officially organized into the Southwest Territory, land collectively corresponding to modern-day Tennessee.

In 1795, there were enough people in the Southwest Territory to petition for statehood. Then Governor Blount (appointed by George Washington) convened a constitutional convention and its delegates drafted a state constitution. The Southwest Territory was the first federal territory to petition to join the Union; after some conflicting opinions in the U.S. Congress, Tennessee was finally admitted to the Union on June 1, 1796 as the 16th state.

In 1838, as the population of Tennessee continued to grow and demand for land increased, U.S. President Martin Van Buren ordered nearly 17,000 Cherokees uprooted from their ancestral homes in Tennessee. They were subsequently forced by the U.S. military to move to Indian Territories west of Arkansas. During that brutal relocation march, an estimated 4,000 Cherokees died along the way.

Slavery and States’ Rights long fueled the desire for independence across the south. By February of 1861, six southern states had already seceded from the Union, and Tennessee joined them on June 8, 1861. Although Tennessee joined the Confederacy there was much pro-Union sentiment in the state.

“There is a terrible war coming, and these young men who have never seen war cannot wait for it to happen, but I tell you, I wish that I owned every slave in the South, for I would free them all to avoid this war.” Robert E. Lee.

Tennessee is aptly called “The Volunteer State,” as in the Civil War, it distinguished itself with military leadership, and by the brave, unwavering exploits of its native sons.


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SOURCE: http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/namerica/usstates/tn.htm

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Vermont, State Facts – History ( Video

#Is #vermont #a #state #in #the #usa

Vermont, State Facts - History ( Video, REMMONT.COM


Is vermont a state in the usa

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Governor: Phillip Scott, R (to Jan. 2019)

Lieut. Governor: David Zuckerman, P (to Jan. 2019)

Present constitution adopted: 1793

Motto: Vermont, Freedom and Unity

flower red clover (1894)
tree sugar maple (1949)
bird hermit thrush (1941)
animal Morgan horse (1961)
insect honeybee (1978)
song “These Green Mountains” (2000)

Origin of name: From the French “vert mont,” meaning “green mountain”

10 largest cities (2010 est.): Burlington, 42,417; Essex, 19,587; South Burlington, 17,993; Colchester 17,067; Rutland, 16,495; Bennington 15,764, Brattleboro 12,046; Milton, 10,352; Hartford, 9,952; Springfield, 9,078; Barre, 9,052; Williston, 8,698; Middlebury, 8,496

Geographic center: In Washington Co., 3 mi. E of Roxbury

Number of counties: 14

Largest county by population and area: Chittenden, 156,545 (2010); Windsor, 971 sq mi.

State forests: 300,000 ac.

2010 res >625,741 (49). Male: 308,206 (49.3%); Female: 317,535 (50.7%). White: 596,292 (95.3%); Black: 6,277 (1.0%); American Indian: 2,207 (0.4%); Asian: 7,947 (1.3%); Other race: 2,105 (0.3%); Two or more races: 10,753 (1.7%); Hispanic/Latino: 9,208 (1.5%). 2010 percent population 18 and over: 79.3; 65 and over: 14.6; median age: 41.5.

The Vermont region was explored and claimed for France by Samuel de Champlain in 1609, and the first French settlement was established at Fort Ste. Anne in 1666. The first English settlers moved into the area in 1724 and built Fort Dummer on the site of present-day Brattleboro. England gained control of the area in 1763 after the French and Indian Wars.

First organized to drive settlers from New York out of Vermont, the Green Mountain Boys, led by Ethan Allen, won fame by capturing Fort Ticonderoga from the British on May 10, 1775, in the early days of the Revolutionary War. In 1777 Vermont adopted its first constitution, abolishing slavery and providing for universal male suffrage without property qualifications.

Vermont leads the nation in the production of monument granite, marble, and maple products. It is also a leader in the production of talc. Vermont’s rugged, rocky terrain discourages extensive agricultural farming, but is well suited to raising fruit trees and to dairy farming.

Principal industrial products include electrical equipment, fabricated metal products, printing and publishing, and paper and allied products.

Tourism is a major industry in Vermont. Vermont’s many famous ski areas include Stowe, Killington, Mt. Snow, Okemo, Jay Peak, and Sugarbush. Hunting and fishing also attract many visitors to Vermont each year. Among the many points of interest are the Green Mountain National Forest, Bennington Battle Monument, the Calvin Coolidge Homestead at Plymouth, and the Marble Exhibit in Proctor.

Vermont has become a trailblazer for gay rights. In April 2009, Vermont became the fourth state to legalize gay marriage. It was the first state to legalize gay marriage by a legislature’s vote. The House and Senate voted to override Governor Jim Douglas’ veto. Prior to this vote, Vermont was the first state to legalize same-sex civil unions.

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SOURCE: http://www.infoplease.com/us/states/vermont

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The university of illinois * Video

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The university of illinois

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Changing Lives

University of Illinois Extension is the flagship outreach effort of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, offering educational programs to residents of all of Illinois’ 102 counties — and far beyond.

Extension Spotlight

Seven teams funded to provide University of Illinois research for Illinois communities

Seven projects have been selected to receive funding in the 2018 Interdisciplinary Collaboration Extension (ICE) grant competition. more

Extension works to end hunger for Illinois families

One in nine Illinois residents do not know where their next meal is coming from, including 15.7 percent of children. University of Illinois Extension helps fill in these gaps for Illinois families through programs on nutrition education, 4-H youth development, and horticulture. more

Students, Master Gardeners Grow Memorial Garden for UI Scholar

A 600-square-foot section of grass near the spot Yingying Zhang was last seen is being transformed into a memorial garden dedicated to the missing Chinese scholar. The memorial is designed by the Champaign County Master Gardeners at the suggestion of Ms. Zhang’s friends and the Chinese Students and Scholars Association. more

Kids run the kitchen with Illinois Junior Chefs

Even picky eaters who walk into a kitchen with Illinois Junior Chefs end up surprising themselves – and their families – when they leave excited to prepare healthy meals at home. more

Abriendo Caminos Health Educator Program Takes On Childhood Obesity

To help families who may be struggling with obesity, University of Illinois Extension has partnered with the College of ACES and the Family Resiliency Center to bring health programming and educational resources into one of the most underserved populations in the U.S. more

Gov. Rauner announces release of additional $5 million to Extension

Gov. Bruce Rauner announced the release of $16 million in agriculture grants on Friday, including $5 million for University of Illinois Extension services. more

Juntos “Together” 4-H Program Inspires Latino Teens to Pursue their Education Dreams

Juntos 4-H clubs help family members support youth by providing seminars that bring the families together for activities that prepare youth to achieve success through high school graduation, pursuit of post-secondary education, and sustained employment. more

Bipartisan coalition secures release of $10 million to University of Illinois Extension

The state of Illinois has released $10 million to University of Illinois Extension, including $8.35 million to match contributions from county boards. more

Million-meal milestone ensures families have food to eat

On April 4, Illinois 4-H passed a major milestone, providing more than one million meals to families as part of the 4-H Feeding & Growing Our Communities initiative. more

Farmland donated to benefit Clinton County Extension

The Cecilia Wiedle Trust provided 70 acres of farm ground for the benefit of the Clinton County Extension Foundation. more

As Spring Nears, ‘Tis the Season for Horticulture Education

Gardeners seek out Illinois Extension programs to gain insight on the latest developments in horticulture and to get inspired for the upcoming gardening season. more

When trauma touches the classroom: U of I Extension workshops train teachers to offer hope

Eighty percent of children receive no mental health services, and among those who do, most receive the services at school. The workshops, provided by University of Illinois Extension community health educator Michele Crawford, are part of an effort help the educators who come in regular contact with the students identify the mental health signs of trauma. more

Looking for anaplasmosis in beef cattle

Researchers at University of Illinois Extension are working with beef cattle producers in the southern third of the state to determine the prevalence of a disease that causes cows to become listless and sometimes die. more

Illinois organizations partner with Extension to combat malnutrition in seniors

University of Illinois Extension is working with other organizations to combat this growing threat to the health of older residents in Illinois. more

Extension’s Tony Franklin awarded 2017 Larine Y. Cowan Make a Difference Award on Leadership in Diversity

The award honors nominees who demonstrate exceptional dedication to and success in promoting diversity and inclusion. more

Piece by piece, 4-H members stitch together hope for children battling cancer

Fifty 4-H members, leaders and friends in Champaign County stepped in to help their peers by providing comforting items as they travel on the road to recovery. more

STARTUP Jefferson County provides entrepreneurs and small business owners the tools to succeed

The organization is filling the void when state-funded local Small Business Development Centers closed in the area. more

In the face of disaster, Extension Disaster Education Network provides enduring support

Many areas throughout the country at some point will experience a disaster—manmade, natural or both. EDEN, an organization made up of land-grant university Extensions, is there to assist in the recovery from the start. more

Peoria “stormwater farm” demonstrates power of connecting design thinking with improved public health outcomes

On Oct. 26, the city of Peoria will break ground on a pilot project transforming vacant land on the city’s south side into a “stormwater farm” that will help manage chronic sewer overflows impacting low-income neighborhoods while simultaneously significantly enhancing community health and vibrancy. more

Incoming freshmen: Apply now for the Extension to ACES Scholarship!

The Extension to University of Illinois College of ACES Scholarship will award up to 54 scholarships of $2,500 each for the 2018-2019 academic year for incoming freshman or transfer students who are current residents of Illinois. more

As the Refuge Food Forest bears fruit, a community’s fascination blossoms

An experimental agricultural installation is serving as an outdoor classroom for many elementary-aged students and families in Normal and with just a few steps, this may be the opportunity to learn how add a “food forest” in your backyard or county. more

Think globally, act locally: Woodchip bioreactors help farmers reduce nutrient runoff

The excitement was palpable at Todd VerHeecke’s farm in Geneseo on Wednesday, September 27 as farmers, agriculture industry representatives, TV and radio news, and even a French media station gathered to see a woodchip bioreactor being installed. more

BRANDT 4-H race car wins Xfinity maiden race

BRANDT believes so much in the future of agriculture, the Illinois Ag company put the icons of the two greatest youth development organizations, 4-H and FFA, on the hood of its racecar. more

Champaign-Urbana collects 13,000 pounds of unwanted medicine

Since the Urbana Police Department installed its box in 2013 as part of Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant and University of Illinois Extension’s medicine take-back program, it’s only grown in popularity. more

Data-Driven Dairy

Department of Animal Science researcher Phil Cardoso’s Dairy Focus Team is revolutionizing the definition of dairy extension, not to mention turning out the next generation of leaders in the industry. more

Illinois biennial report recognizes positive, voluntary steps to reduce nutrient loss

As part of the state’s on-going commitment to reduce nutrient losses, University of Illinois Extension staff joined directors of the Illinois Department of Agriculture and Illinois Environmental Protection Agency for the release of the state’s Nutrient Loss Reduction Strategy Biennial Report. more

Persistence pays off: Orr Center celebrates 40 years of progress, partnership

No research station better exemplifies the power of persistence than the Orr Agricultural Research and Development Center in western Illinois. Since 1979, residents of Adams, Brown, Calhoun, Cass, Greene, Jersey, Macoupin, Morgan, Pike, Schuyler, and Scott counties have leaned on the Orr Center’s research to inform their farming decisions. more

Gardening with your senses

Gardeners may be familiar with the sense of calm and peace that can come from relaxing in a patch of fragrant and colorful flowers. It’s little wonder that the gardens have been harnessed for their therapeutic effects. more

Google donates $1.5 million and virtual reality technology to support 4-H youth science programs

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – Google representatives and Gov. Bruce Rauner met today at the Illinois State Fair to announce the company’s donation of $1.5 million in funding support and virtual reality equipment to support 4-H youth science programs across the U.S., including Illinois. more

Extension wins award at Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior 2017 annual conference

https://4h.extension.illinois.edu/Extension’s Illinois Junior Chefs program received the Nutrition Education Program Impact Award at the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior’s annual conference on July 21, in Washington D.C. more

4-H has your seat to the eclipse

[email protected] 4-H is inviting the public to a front row seat for the historic total solar eclipse in August in southern Illinois where the sun’s path creates the longest duration of darkness. more

4-H Bridge Bust Participants Earn More than Awards

Families, community members, 4-H’ers, and school students put
their engineering skills to the test in the Fifth Annual 4-H Bridge Bust
Competition in Plano, Illinois. more

Macon County Master Naturalist Gives Back

Clarence Josefson is one of 45 Extension Master Naturalists in Macon County advancing science, stewarding natural areas, and educating the public. more

U of I Students Share Ideas to Improve Peoria’s Southside Neighborhood

U of I School of Architecture students presented design ideas for a safer, more connected, more vibrant Southside Neighborhood in Peoria. This is a collaboration between U of I Extension and the U of I College of Fine and Applied Arts. more

Two University of Illinois Extension Master Gardener Pollinator Projects Receive Grants

To help educate the community on the important role pollinators’ play in our lives, University of Illinois Extension has received grant funds for pollinator projects in Mercer and Rock Island Counties. more

Healthy Carnival Planned by Teens to Promote Nutrition and Activity

Thirty teens from Moline, IL planned a Healthy Carnival to increase awareness in their community about healthy eating and activity. more

Illinois Master Gardener program celebrates 40th anniversary

This past year marked the 40th anniversary of the Illinois Master Gardener program. With over 3,000 members today, Illinois Master Gardeners have given more than 2.3 million volunteer hours, a value of over $46 million, to the state. more

Illinois State Board of Education Awards $4.5 million to U of I Extension for school food-service training

It can be a struggle to get kids to eat a well-balanced, nutritious meal at home. Imagine the challenge of encouraging 1.9 million children in schools each day to eat healthier foods. University of Illinois Extension has received $4.5 million over three years to help by providing training and education to school food-service professionals statewide. more

Rockford third graders ‘Farming in the Class’

Third graders at Conklin Elementary School in Rockford, Illinois had the opportunity to discover how seasonal fruits and vegetables grow and travel to their classroom. Called Farming in the Class, this is a program that is a collaboration with Annie Hobson, 4-H Youth Metro Educator, and Grant McCarty, Local Foods and Small Farms Educator. more

Extension experts talk turkey

Everything you need to know about safety, cooking techniques, side dishes, carving, leftovers, nutrition, and more. more

4-H Teens as Teachers have positive impact

Southern Illinois teens learn technology and design tools from U of I experts, then teach day campers more

Pond management workshop promotes stewardship, sound practices

Attendees gained an understanding of how they can improve their own pond while also doing their part to advance conservation. more

An edible forest takes root in Normal

The Refuge Food Forest in Normal is an urban demonstration site for the University of Illinois woody perennial polyculture research. more


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SOURCE:

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#What is the land area of colorado ( #Video

#What #is #the #land #area #of #colorado



What is the land area of colorado

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Our Southern Colorado professionals
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Colorado Homestead offers a range of properties in Colorado and beyond. Years of working in the real estate industry has given us the essential knowledge and experience when it comes to the market’s needs. Among the many demands we handle include bug out property for doomsday preppers. With our unique properties and surrounding landscape, we provide a safe and private retreat for your needs.

Log Cabins

We have listings for many different types of cabins. These cabins are beautiful, as are the mountain properties they are set on. If you are looking for a unique mountain home, cabin, hunting, or vacation property, click here for information on Colorado cabins.

Trinidad Colorado Real Estate

Our Trinidad Real Estate in Southern Colorado features a variety of quality homes. If you want the convenience of living near a town with all the charm of a budding artisan community you will want to check out all our Trinidad Colorado properties and surrounding areas.

Explore Our Website

Colorado mountain property! Let our website be your gateway to finding the perfect land and property for you! There is an abundance of information on our site, so be sure to take the time to look at our helpful tools, advice and help, and for many of the answers to your questions. Don’t leave without checking out our Colorado mountain property!

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Cell Phone Directory, Cell Phone Reverse Lookup, Cell Phone Registry, the cell phone.

#The #cell #phone



the cell phone

The cell phone

Welcome to the National Registry of Cellular Numbers

NRCN is the leading cell phone directory and provider of online cell phone lookups. Our powerful cell phone directory tool searches the largest database of Landline, Mobile and Unlisted Phone Numbers to bring you the most up-to-date and accurate data. Please use the form below to lookup cell phone numbers instantly.

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Report May Include: Full Name and Full Address associated with the number, Cell Phone or Phone Carrier information, Date of Birth, Phone Numbers, Dates of Issuance.

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Unauthorized duplication, distribution, or copying in any way is prohibited by law and will be prosecuted.

This website is not affiliated with the United States Government or any Federal or State government agency.

By using this site, cell phone directory and reverse cell phone lookup, you certify that you will use any information obtained for lawfully acceptable purposes. Please be advised that it is against the law to use the information obtained from this site to stalk or harass others. Search requests on public officials, juveniles, and/or celebrities are strictly prohibited. Users who request information under false pretenses or use data obtained from this site in contravention of the law may be subject to civil criminal penalties. All searches are subject to terms of use and applicable law. Information contained herein is derived from records that may have errors and/or not always be accurate or complete.



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Inventor of cell phone: We knew someday everybody would have one, the cell phone.

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Inventor of cell phone: We knew someday everybody would have one

The cell phone

  • In 1973, Martin Cooper and his team at Motorola built, demonstrated first cell phone
  • Cooper says that first phone cost $3,900, plus 50 cents a minute to talk
  • Cooper: We knew that someday everybody would have a [cell] phone
  • Today he has several cell phones — but not an iPhone, which he gave away

(CNN) — In 1973, Martin Cooper changed the world, although he didn’t know it yet.

Cooper and his team at Motorola, the communications company, created maybe the only thing that runs the lives of business professionals and teenagers alike — the cell phone.

It was the size of a brick and wasn’t commercially sold for another decade. But as Cooper demonstrated on a New York sidewalk, it worked.

The concept of cellular technology had already been created by Motorola’s rival, AT T, whose Bell Labs introduced a system allowing calls to be moved from one cell to another while remaining on the same channel. But AT T was focusing this technology on the car phone.

Cooper wanted people to have freedom to talk on the phone away from their cars. So in reaction, he and Motorola embarked on a project to create a more portable device.

Motorola spent three months building a prototype for a portable, mobile handset that Cooper publicly demonstrated in April of 1973. The company’s first commercial cellular phone, the DynaTAC, went on sale 10 years later.

Cooper, now 81, is founder of ArrayComm, a company working to improve cellular networks, smart antenna and wireless communication. He and his wife are also inventors of the Jitterbug, a simplified cell phone geared to senior citizens.

The cell phone

Cooper was surprised when his landline dropped our call. After calling him back on his mobile, we had a chance to ask him about the creation of the device that changed the face of communication as we know it.

Here is an edited transcript of our conversation:

CNN: What was the technology climate like back in 1973, and what gave you the idea to move with the cell phone and compete with AT T’s car phone?

Cooper: There were no large-scale integrated circuits, no computers, no closed-circuit televisions, no LCD screens — I can’t tell you all the things that did not exist in 1973. But, we’d been building phones for years and years in cars, and we [Motorola] thought the time was ready for personal communication, ’cause people are just naturally mobile.

For 100 years, people wanting to talk on the phone have been constrained by being tied to their desks or their homes with a wire, and now we’re going to trap them in their cars? That’s not good.

So we decided to take on AT T. By 1973, we decided to put on a dazzling presentation, and I decided the best way to do that was to build a phone and have someone actually have the experience of talking on a real personal handheld telephone. And that was the genesis of that phone that we built.

When did you make that first phone call? Who was it to?

I thought everybody knew the answer to that question! The first public call was made out on the streets of New York. It was to [Joel S. Engel], the head of the cellular program at AT T. I called and told him, Joel, I’m calling you from a cellular phone, a real cellular phone, a handheld, portable, real cellular phone.

I don’t remember exactly what he said, but it was really quiet for a while. My assumption was that he was grinding his teeth. He was very polite and ended the call. When asked about it, he says he has no recollection of this moment.

What were the reactions to the cell phone like? Did people think it was unbelievable, impossible, unnecessary?

Well, people were dazzled by the concept! It was beyond imagination that more than half the people in the world would have these phones. But people were absolutely amazed by the fact that you could hold the phone up to your ear, walk around and make a phone call.

Remember, there were not even any cordless phones at that time. We had a press conference [in 1973], and I handed the phone to this young lady journalist and told her to make a phone call. And she said, Can I call my mother in Australia? and I said, Sure! And she did that.

This woman was just spellbound, she couldn’t imagine how this little phone could reach more than halfway around the world, and talk to her mother who actually answered the phone. Sophisticated New Yorkers were standing there with their mouths open.

The reception was quite extraordinary. The chairman of our company happened to be in Washington the time we did the next demonstration [in the early 1980s]. He visited with the vice president . [George H.W. Bush] . and showed him this new phone, and he was so taken by the phone.

He said, Well, I have to show this to Ron. And the next thing you know he was showing it to Ronald Reagan. And Reagan asks, What’s keeping us from having this?

What did the phone look like? How much did it cost and who actually bought it?

The phone [was] about 10 or 11 inches high, about 1 1/2 inches across, and about 4 inches deep. It weighed about 2 1/2 pounds.

How much did it cost?

If you think about it, this is not a commercial product and if you had to build one it would cost about a million dollars. By the time we built a commercial product, it was 10 years later. We didn’t sell that product until October of 1983, and the phone then cost $3,900. So that would be like buying a phone today for $10,000.

That’s quite a lot of money. Who actually bought these phones?

Well, I wouldn’t say it was large number of people; in fact it was a very small number. In the beginning it was wealthy people, but also people who had to be on the move. It was for people like real estate agents and doctors, who were already more accustomed to technology because they were using pagers.

Cell phones didn’t really get to be a big deal til about another seven or eight years later. Everybody thinks that the cell phone has always been here and that it’s always been popular, but it wasn’t until 1990 — before there were as few as a million cell phones in the world — that’s where it started to really explode.

Did you ever think the phone would ever be available to everyone?

Well, we knew that someday everybody would have a [cell] phone, but it was hard to imagine that that would happen in my lifetime. And now we’ve got almost five billion phones in the world. Wow.

How do you feel about the advancements cell phones have made, especially with features like apps and cameras, etc.?

I must tell you as much as we were dreamers, we never imagined that all these things could be combined into one, and I’m really not so sure that it’s a great thing. Phones have gotten so complicated, so hard to use, that you wonder if this is designed for real people or for engineers.

I think what’s really going to happen is we’re going to have a lot of different kinds of phones when our industry grows up — some that are just plain, simple telephones. In fact, my wife and I started a company, and she designed the Jitterbug, which is just a simple telephone.

What kind of phone do you have now?

I’m sitting here looking at all of my phones. I’m talking to you on a phone I’m trying out for a company in Europe. It’s called the Vertu, and this phone starts at $5,000. And that’s for the very cheap model. You could buy a solid-gold version of this phone.

So this phone, even with inflation, costs about half as much as your first cell phone.

Yep, and really this phone is not a really complicated phone. It does have a phonebook in it, it does reach certain parts of the Web, but it’s not a PDA. You can’t read e-mail on it; it doesn’t have a camera on it. It really is a basic telephone.

I also have a Droid. I got a Motorola Droid that I use. I also have a Jitterbug. I’m always trying whatever the latest telephone is. I had an iPhone for a while, I gave that to my grandson. Kids are really caught up in that. But I think that the Android phones are catching up now, and the latest version of the Android phones are every bit as good, if not better, than the iPhone.

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EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use, EWG, the cell phone.

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EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

The cell phone

The cell phone

EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

Support EWG

EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

The cell phoneBack in 1996, when the Federal Communications Commission set a legal maximum on cell phone radiation, Motorola was touting its tiny $2,000 StarTac, the first clamshell phone and an early adopter of — texting!

Sixteen years later, cell phones — with 6 billion subscriptions worldwide and counting — have revolutionized how we communicate. The technology that powers them has changed just as dramatically. Today s smartphones vibrate, rock out, show high-def movies, make photos and videos, issue voice commands, check email, go underwater, navigate with global positioning systems and surf the web in 3-D. They sport dual core processors and batteries that let you or your kid — talk for close to 20 hours. (The StarTac maxed out at just 3 hours.)

The cell phoneYet those 16-year-old FCC rules still stand. Are they up to the job of protecting the public from radiation coming out of those multi-tasking marvels and the networks that enable them?

Studies conducted by numerous scientific teams in several nations have raised troubling questions about possible associations between heavy cell phone use and serious health dangers. The World Health Organization has declared that cell phone radiation may be linked to brain cancer. Ten studies connect cell phone radiation to diminished sperm count and sperm damage. Others raise health concerns such as altered brain metabolism, sleep disturbance and behavioral changes in children.

These studies are not definitive. Much more research is needed. But they raise serious questions that cast doubt on the adequacy of the FCC rules to safeguard public health. The FCC emissions cap allows 20 times more radiation to reach the head than the body as a whole, does not account for risks to children s developing brains and smaller bodies and considers only short-term cell phone use, not frequent calling patterns over decades.

The FCC s safety standards for cell phone radiation were based on studies conducted in the 1980s, These studies have long since been rendered obsolete by newer research. Yet for years the FCC refused to update or even review its standards. Instead, the federal agency simply sat on its hands while cell phones became ever more powerful and ubiquitous.

The agency is finally moving to meet the realities of the 21st century and the Information Age. On June 15, FCC chairman Julius Genachowski circulated a proposal to his four fellow commissioners calling for formal review of the 1996 regulations. To advance, his plan must be approved by a majority of the commissioners. If they agree, the FCC could take the long overdue step of modernizing its safety standards. But the pace is likely to be glacial.

Consumers need — now more than ever — real-world, relevant data on how much radiation their phones emit under various circumstances. The FCC does not require the cell phone industry to disclose these data. One important study showing that certain networks could expose consumers to 30 to 300 times more radiation than other networks was hidden from the public until the information was dated to the point of irrelevancy.

Given this appalling lack of information in the face of a cell phone market where just about anything goes,

the Environmental Working Group is suspending publication of the EWG guide to cell phones until the FCC makes the responsible decision to require cell phone makers to generate and disclose data about device and network emissions under real-world conditions. We strongly believe that as cell phones become more powerful and ubiquitous, it is critical that people have a right to know how much radiation they can expect their cell phones to generate. As things now stand, the FCC s cell phone safety rules are as obsolete as the StarTac.

In the meantime, EWG recommends that consumers take steps to reduce their exposures to cell phone radiation by holding phones away from their bodies, using earpieces and following and other simple tips in EWG s updated Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use.



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Cell Phone Reviews, Cell Phones Review, the cell phone.

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Cell Phones Reviews

Top Phones on Every Carrier

We test and rate hundreds of mobile phones each year. These are the 10 best you can get right now.

Fastest Mobile Networks

Before buying your next phone, find out which carrier has the fastest data network near you.

The Best Android Phones

The greatest thing about Google’s mobile OS: Your choice of handsets on all the major wireless carriers.

Top Picks: Phones for Kids

Trust us, your kid wants a phone. But which one is best? Check out our recommendations.

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Samsung Galaxy S8 Active Review

Bottom Line: The Samsung Galaxy S8 Active takes the best phone of the year, makes it tougher, and packs in a bigger battery. It’s the ultimate rugged phone—but it’s only available on AT ?>

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EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use, EWG, on the cell phone.

#On #the #cell #phone



EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

On the cell phone

On the cell phone

EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

Support EWG

EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

On the cell phoneBack in 1996, when the Federal Communications Commission set a legal maximum on cell phone radiation, Motorola was touting its tiny $2,000 StarTac, the first clamshell phone and an early adopter of — texting!

Sixteen years later, cell phones — with 6 billion subscriptions worldwide and counting — have revolutionized how we communicate. The technology that powers them has changed just as dramatically. Today s smartphones vibrate, rock out, show high-def movies, make photos and videos, issue voice commands, check email, go underwater, navigate with global positioning systems and surf the web in 3-D. They sport dual core processors and batteries that let you or your kid — talk for close to 20 hours. (The StarTac maxed out at just 3 hours.)

On the cell phoneYet those 16-year-old FCC rules still stand. Are they up to the job of protecting the public from radiation coming out of those multi-tasking marvels and the networks that enable them?

Studies conducted by numerous scientific teams in several nations have raised troubling questions about possible associations between heavy cell phone use and serious health dangers. The World Health Organization has declared that cell phone radiation may be linked to brain cancer. Ten studies connect cell phone radiation to diminished sperm count and sperm damage. Others raise health concerns such as altered brain metabolism, sleep disturbance and behavioral changes in children.

These studies are not definitive. Much more research is needed. But they raise serious questions that cast doubt on the adequacy of the FCC rules to safeguard public health. The FCC emissions cap allows 20 times more radiation to reach the head than the body as a whole, does not account for risks to children s developing brains and smaller bodies and considers only short-term cell phone use, not frequent calling patterns over decades.

The FCC s safety standards for cell phone radiation were based on studies conducted in the 1980s, These studies have long since been rendered obsolete by newer research. Yet for years the FCC refused to update or even review its standards. Instead, the federal agency simply sat on its hands while cell phones became ever more powerful and ubiquitous.

The agency is finally moving to meet the realities of the 21st century and the Information Age. On June 15, FCC chairman Julius Genachowski circulated a proposal to his four fellow commissioners calling for formal review of the 1996 regulations. To advance, his plan must be approved by a majority of the commissioners. If they agree, the FCC could take the long overdue step of modernizing its safety standards. But the pace is likely to be glacial.

Consumers need — now more than ever — real-world, relevant data on how much radiation their phones emit under various circumstances. The FCC does not require the cell phone industry to disclose these data. One important study showing that certain networks could expose consumers to 30 to 300 times more radiation than other networks was hidden from the public until the information was dated to the point of irrelevancy.

Given this appalling lack of information in the face of a cell phone market where just about anything goes,

the Environmental Working Group is suspending publication of the EWG guide to cell phones until the FCC makes the responsible decision to require cell phone makers to generate and disclose data about device and network emissions under real-world conditions. We strongly believe that as cell phones become more powerful and ubiquitous, it is critical that people have a right to know how much radiation they can expect their cell phones to generate. As things now stand, the FCC s cell phone safety rules are as obsolete as the StarTac.

In the meantime, EWG recommends that consumers take steps to reduce their exposures to cell phone radiation by holding phones away from their bodies, using earpieces and following and other simple tips in EWG s updated Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use.



Categories
News

Cell Phone Directory, Cell Phone Reverse Lookup, Cell Phone Registry, on the cell phone.

#On #the #cell #phone



on the cell phone

On the cell phone

Welcome to the National Registry of Cellular Numbers

NRCN is the leading cell phone directory and provider of online cell phone lookups. Our powerful cell phone directory tool searches the largest database of Landline, Mobile and Unlisted Phone Numbers to bring you the most up-to-date and accurate data. Please use the form below to lookup cell phone numbers instantly.

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Report May Include: Full Name and Full Address associated with the number, Cell Phone or Phone Carrier information, Date of Birth, Phone Numbers, Dates of Issuance.

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Unauthorized duplication, distribution, or copying in any way is prohibited by law and will be prosecuted.

This website is not affiliated with the United States Government or any Federal or State government agency.

By using this site, cell phone directory and reverse cell phone lookup, you certify that you will use any information obtained for lawfully acceptable purposes. Please be advised that it is against the law to use the information obtained from this site to stalk or harass others. Search requests on public officials, juveniles, and/or celebrities are strictly prohibited. Users who request information under false pretenses or use data obtained from this site in contravention of the law may be subject to civil criminal penalties. All searches are subject to terms of use and applicable law. Information contained herein is derived from records that may have errors and/or not always be accurate or complete.



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#Picture of the state of tennessee and #Video

#Picture #of #the #state #of #tennessee



Picture of the state of tennessee

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Tennessee State Seal

Great Seal of the State of State

Adopted in 1987.

The Great Seal of the State of Tennessee is the official insignia of the U.S. state of Tennessee.

An official Great Seal of Tennessee is provided for in the Constitution of the State of Tennessee of February 6, 1796. However, design was not undertaken until September 25, 1801.

The current seal was officially adopted in 1987 by the 95th General Assembly, Public Chapter 402.

The current seal contains images similar to past seals, although notably different is the image representing Commerce. The boatman has disappeared, and the ship is now a larger rigged vessel. The current seal also contains just the year of statehood, 1796, rather than the full date as before.

Tennessee Great Seal

The current seal was officially adopted in 1987. Even before Tennessee achieved statehood efforts were made by local governmental organizations to procure official seals. Reliable historians have assumed that as early as 1772 the Articles of the Agreement of the Watauga Association authorized the use of a seal. The Legislature of the state of Franklin, by an official act, provided “for procuring a Great Seal for this State,” and there is also evidence that a seal was intended for the Territory South of the River Ohio. The secretary of that territory requested the assistance of Thomas Jefferson in March, 1792, in “suggesting a proper device” for a seal. There is no direct evidence, however, that a seal was ever made for any of these predecessors of Tennessee.

When Tennessee became a state, the Constitution of 1796 made provision for the preparation of a seal. Each subsequent constitution made similar provisions and always in the same words as the first. This provision is (Constitution of 1796, Article II, Section 15; Constitution of 1835, Article III, Section 15; Constitution of 1870, Article III, Section 15) as follows:

There shall be a seal of this state, which shall be kept by the governor, and used by him officially, and shall be called “The Great Seal of the State of Tennessee.”

In spite of the provision of the Constitution of 1796, apparently no action was taken until September 25, 1801. On that date committees made up of members from both the Senate and the House of Representatives were appointed. One of these was to “prepare a device and motto” for a seal, while the other was to contract with a suitable person to cut a seal and press for the use of the state. Original State Seal Official State Seal

The committee appointed to prepare a design for the state seal recommended that:

. the said seal shall be a circle, two inches and a quarter in diameter, that the circumference of the circle contain the words THE GREAT SEAL OF THE STATE OF TENNESSEE, that in the lower part of said circumference be inserted Feb. 6th, 1796, the date of the Constitution of this state; that in the inside of the upper part of said circle, be set in numerical letters XVI, the number of the state in chronological order; that under the base of the upper semicircle, there be the word AGRICULTURE; that above said base, there be the figure of a plough, sheaf of wheat and cotton plant; that in the lower part of the lower semicircle, there be the word COMMERCE, and said lower semicircle shall also contain the figure of a boat and boatman. TENNESSEE SYMBOLS AND HONORS 493

The other committee reported that it had contracted with William and Matthew Atkinson to make the seal and press.

The seal and press were delivered to Gov. Archibald Roane in April 1802 and were used for the first time April 24, 1802, on a document ordering payment for them. Before this time, both John Sevier and Archibald Roane had used their personal seal in official documents. This seal continued in use under seven governors until 1829 when Gov. William Hall was the last governor to use it. Then, during the second series of administrations of Gov. William Carroll, a different seal came into use, though there is no record of its authorization. This second seal was only one and three-quarters inches wide and the date “Feb. 6th,”was omitted. The boat, differing greatly in design from the original, was pointed in the opposite direction. The seal was at variance with the original in other respects as well. It remained in use from 1829 until the administrations of William Brownlow from 1865 to 1869.

A close examination of official documents bearing the Great Seal, particularly between 1855 and 1875, indicates that the seal now being used was introduced during the administration of Gov. William Brownlow. Only one document, dated 1865, was found containing the seal attributed to the Brownlow administration. Instead, examination of Brownlow documents of 1866 and 1867 revealed the use of two seals, evidently used simultaneously. One seal appears to be the same as that affixed to documents signed by Governors Brownlow, Senter, Porter and Hawkins.

Evidently, the so-called “Brownlow Seal” was used only in 1865, when it was replaced by two other seals which were only slightly different from each other. The seal now used was the larger of the two and appears to have been the only one used since the last year of Brownlow’s administration. The current seal was officially adopted in 1987 by the 95th General Assembly, Public Chapter 402.

The Roman numerals XVI, representing Tennessee as the 16th state to enter the United States, is found at the top of the seal.

The images of a plow, a bundle of wheat, a cotton plant, and the word “Agriculture” below the three images occupying the center of the seal. Wheat and cotton were, and still are important cash crops grown in the state.

The lower half of the seal was originally supposed to display a boat and a boatman with the word “Commerce” underneath, but was changed to a flat-bottomed-riverboat without a boatman subsequently. River trade was important to the state due to three large rivers: the Tennessee River, the Cumberland River, and the Mississippi River; the boat continues to represent the importance of commerce to the State.

Surrounding the images are the words “The Great Seal of the State of Tennessee”, and “Feb. 6th, 1796”. The day and month have been dropped from later designs.


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SOURCE: http://www.ereferencedesk.com/resources/state-seal/tennessee.html

Categories
News

EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use, EWG, on the cell phone.

#On #the #cell #phone



EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

On the cell phone

On the cell phone

EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

Support EWG

EWG s Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use

On the cell phoneBack in 1996, when the Federal Communications Commission set a legal maximum on cell phone radiation, Motorola was touting its tiny $2,000 StarTac, the first clamshell phone and an early adopter of — texting!

Sixteen years later, cell phones — with 6 billion subscriptions worldwide and counting — have revolutionized how we communicate. The technology that powers them has changed just as dramatically. Today s smartphones vibrate, rock out, show high-def movies, make photos and videos, issue voice commands, check email, go underwater, navigate with global positioning systems and surf the web in 3-D. They sport dual core processors and batteries that let you or your kid — talk for close to 20 hours. (The StarTac maxed out at just 3 hours.)

On the cell phoneYet those 16-year-old FCC rules still stand. Are they up to the job of protecting the public from radiation coming out of those multi-tasking marvels and the networks that enable them?

Studies conducted by numerous scientific teams in several nations have raised troubling questions about possible associations between heavy cell phone use and serious health dangers. The World Health Organization has declared that cell phone radiation may be linked to brain cancer. Ten studies connect cell phone radiation to diminished sperm count and sperm damage. Others raise health concerns such as altered brain metabolism, sleep disturbance and behavioral changes in children.

These studies are not definitive. Much more research is needed. But they raise serious questions that cast doubt on the adequacy of the FCC rules to safeguard public health. The FCC emissions cap allows 20 times more radiation to reach the head than the body as a whole, does not account for risks to children s developing brains and smaller bodies and considers only short-term cell phone use, not frequent calling patterns over decades.

The FCC s safety standards for cell phone radiation were based on studies conducted in the 1980s, These studies have long since been rendered obsolete by newer research. Yet for years the FCC refused to update or even review its standards. Instead, the federal agency simply sat on its hands while cell phones became ever more powerful and ubiquitous.

The agency is finally moving to meet the realities of the 21st century and the Information Age. On June 15, FCC chairman Julius Genachowski circulated a proposal to his four fellow commissioners calling for formal review of the 1996 regulations. To advance, his plan must be approved by a majority of the commissioners. If they agree, the FCC could take the long overdue step of modernizing its safety standards. But the pace is likely to be glacial.

Consumers need — now more than ever — real-world, relevant data on how much radiation their phones emit under various circumstances. The FCC does not require the cell phone industry to disclose these data. One important study showing that certain networks could expose consumers to 30 to 300 times more radiation than other networks was hidden from the public until the information was dated to the point of irrelevancy.

Given this appalling lack of information in the face of a cell phone market where just about anything goes,

the Environmental Working Group is suspending publication of the EWG guide to cell phones until the FCC makes the responsible decision to require cell phone makers to generate and disclose data about device and network emissions under real-world conditions. We strongly believe that as cell phones become more powerful and ubiquitous, it is critical that people have a right to know how much radiation they can expect their cell phones to generate. As things now stand, the FCC s cell phone safety rules are as obsolete as the StarTac.

In the meantime, EWG recommends that consumers take steps to reduce their exposures to cell phone radiation by holding phones away from their bodies, using earpieces and following and other simple tips in EWG s updated Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use.



Categories
News

Medicaid Cell Phone – Medicaid Cell Phone, on the cell phone.

#On #the #cell #phone



Medicaid Cell Phone Program

This program was created in the 1980 s to make sure that low income families and individuals had access to a phone for basic communication.

Medicaid recipients can easily get their FREE Medicaid cell phone with 250 FREE monthly minutes through any government-approved Lifeline provider. Federal regulations allow only one cell phone per household.

You can apply for your FREE cell phone right now by submitting your email address and zip code below.

To qualify for your Medicaid cell phone with monthly minutes, you must participate in a government assistance program such as Medicaid, Food Stamps (SNAP), Social Security Income (SSI) and most other government assistance programs. Criteria for the Free cell phone varies by state.

If you participate in Medicaid then you can claim your FREE cell phone in minutes! Don’t wait, apply for your Medicaid free cell phone and get connected to emergency services, doctors, family and friends today.

FROM THE BLOG On the cell phoneRSS Feed | Visit our blog

  • On the cell phoneMedicaid Cell Phone Program

It is possible to get a Medicaid cell phone. The Link Up and Lifeline programs have teamed up to provide Medicaid cell phones to qualifying

  • On the cell phoneHow to Qualify for Medicaid

    In order to qualify for Medicaid, applicants must first fit into a certain category. These categories include children, parents of eligible children, pregnant women, and

  • On the cell phoneWhat is Medicaid?

    Medicaid is a health program that is funded by the federal government but administered by the state, so each state may have its own particular

    Success Stories

    Shelly Peck (Little Rock, AR)

    On the cell phone“This program was such a big help. With my free phone I was able to keep in touch with my family and friends and schedule doctor appointments”

    Jim Mathers (Norman, OK)

    On the cell phone“I felt safer with my Lifeline phone knowing I could call someone if something happened to me. It was great for calling my grandchildren too!”

    Violet Johnson (Cleveland, OH)

    On the cell phone“After I got laid off, we had to cut our cell phone service to save money. Thanks to my free Lifeline phone I was able to schedule interviews and get back in the job market.”



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    News

    Where is the university of texas located $ Video

    #History #of #The #University #of #Texas #System, #University #of #Texas #System



    Where is the university of texas located

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    History of The University of Texas System

    “In a real sense there has been a University of Texas System since the beginning of The University of Texas on September 15, 1883. At that time the main university at Austin and the Medical Branch at Galveston were under the authority of the Board of Regents. Over the years, other branches and components were added to the system.” (Donald W. Whisenhunt, The Encyclopedia of Texas Colleges and Universities, 1986)

    “The University of Texas System was established gradually.” (Margaret C. Berry, The University of Texas: A Pictorial Account of its First Century, 1980)

    The Texas Constitution was adopted. Article VII provided that “The Legislature shall as soon as practicable, establish, organize, and provide for the maintenance, support, and direction of a university of the first class, to be located by a vote of the people of this State, and styled “The University of Texas.” The Legislature vested the governance of the University in the Board of Regents of The University of Texas.

    Enabling Legislation was passed. “Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Texas, that there be established in this State, at such locality as may be determined by a vote of the people, an institution of learning, which shall be known as The University of Texas. The medical department of the university shall be located, if so determined by a vote of the people, at a different point from the university proper, and as a branch thereof; and the question of the location of said department shall be submitted to the people and voted separately from the propositions for the location of the main university.

    By vote of the people on September 6, the Main University was selected to be located in Austin and the Medical Branch in Galveston.

    Cornerstone for Old Main laid. (Old Main Building at the medical branch at Galveston.)

    Classes begin at UT Austin on September 15, with 221 students (163 men, 58 women) and eight male faculty.

    First commencement is held in Austin on June 14.

    The Galveston medical branch campus opens.

    The institution now known as UT El Paso is created as the Texas School of Mines and Metallurgy and became a part of the UT System in 1919. (In 1949, its name was changed to Texas Western College, which remained until 1967 when its name was again changed to The University of Texas at El Paso.)

    Santa Rita No. 1 strikes oil. The first oil royalty payment to the Permanent University Fund was made on August 24 in the amount of $516.53.

    The Texas State Cancer Hospital (now known as UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center) is created by the 47th Legislature under the authority of the Board of Regents.

    The UT Dental Branch in Houston (now part of the UT Health Science Center – Houston) comes under the authority of the Board of Regents.

    The University of Texas Postgraduate School of Medicine was established in Houston. (Now part of the UT Health Science Center – Houston)

    The institution now known as The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center accepted for administration by the Board of Regents.

    The Office of Chancellor is created by the Board of Regents. James Pinckney Hart is appointed chancellor.

    Logan Wilson is named acting chancellor. (Wilson also serves as president of UT Austin from 1953 to 1960.)

    Later that year, the Regents abolish the position of chancellor.

    The Legislature creates the South Texas Medical School (now part of the UT Health Science Center – San Antonio).

    The Regents re-establish the position of chancellor. Logan Wilson (still president of UT Austin) is reappointed as chancellor.

    Harry H. Ransom is named chancellor. He serves until 1970. He also holds the office of president of UT Austin from 1960 to 1961. From 1963 to 1967 there is no office of president at UT Austin. As chancellor during these years, Ransom is the CAO of the Austin campus.

    The Legislature creates the UT Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston (now part of the UT Health Science Center – Houston).

    The institution now known as UT Arlington is transferred to UT from the Texas A&M system.

    The Legislature changes the names of institutions within the UT System, giving them uniform designations.

    The Legislature creates the UT School of Public Health in Houston (now part of the UT Health Science Center – Houston).

    The Legislature creates the UT Medical School at Houston (now part of the UT Health Science Center – Houston).

    The Legislature creates the UT Dental School at San Antonio (now part of the UT Health Science Center – San Antonio).

    UT Dallas is established by the Legislature.

    UT Permian Basin is established by the Legislature.

    UT San Antonio is established by the Legislature.

    Charles A. LeMaistre is appointed chancellor. He serves until 1978.

    The Board of Regents reorganizes the biomedical units in Dallas, Galveston, Houston and San Antonio into four health science centers.

    The UT Health Science Center at Houston is established by the Board of Regents through consolidation of several other UT entities.

    The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio is established by the Board of Regents through consolidation of several other entities.

    The UT Health Center at Tyler joins the UT System.

    E. Donald Walker is named chancellor. He serves until 1984.

    The institution now known as UT Tyler joins the UT System.

    Voters approve a constitutional amendment extending use of Permanent University Fund Bonds to all institutions then in the UT or A&M systems.

    Hans Mark is named chancellor. He serves until 1992.

    UT Pan American joins the UT System.

    UT Brownsville is established as a separate UT institution.

    William H. Cunningham is named chancellor. He serves until 2000.

    Voters approve a constitutional amendment that allows the modernization of the investment and spending policies of the Permanent University Fund.

    R.D. Burck is named interim chancellor on June 1 and named permanent chancellor on December 6.

    R.D. Burck announces that he intends to step down as Chancellor by Sept. 1, 2003, as part of an orderly plan for leadership succession.

    Mark G. Yudof is named chancellor on June 21. He serves until 2008.

    Kenneth I. Shine is named interim Chancellor on April 1.

    Francisco G. Cigarroa is named chancellor on January 9.

    Medical Schools established at UT Austin and in South Texas (UT Rio Grande Valley).

    UT Rio Grande Valley authorized by Texas Legislature (Senate Bill 24).

    Board approves appointment of Admiral William H. McRaven as next chancellor.

    William H. McRaven begins his tenure as chancellor on January 5, 2015.

    Classes begin at UT Rio Grande Valley on August 31 with more than 29,000 students. Enrollment surpasses projections by more than 1,000. UT Pan American closes and UT Brownsville continues to serve in an administration function for the upcoming year.

    Larry Faulkner serves as Chancellor ad interim from June 1 through September 15.


    *******
    SOURCE:

    Categories
    News

    Inventor of cell phone: We knew someday everybody would have one, on the cell phone.

    #On #the #cell #phone



    Inventor of cell phone: We knew someday everybody would have one

    On the cell phone

    • In 1973, Martin Cooper and his team at Motorola built, demonstrated first cell phone
    • Cooper says that first phone cost $3,900, plus 50 cents a minute to talk
    • Cooper: We knew that someday everybody would have a [cell] phone
    • Today he has several cell phones — but not an iPhone, which he gave away

    (CNN) — In 1973, Martin Cooper changed the world, although he didn’t know it yet.

    Cooper and his team at Motorola, the communications company, created maybe the only thing that runs the lives of business professionals and teenagers alike — the cell phone.

    It was the size of a brick and wasn’t commercially sold for another decade. But as Cooper demonstrated on a New York sidewalk, it worked.

    The concept of cellular technology had already been created by Motorola’s rival, AT T, whose Bell Labs introduced a system allowing calls to be moved from one cell to another while remaining on the same channel. But AT T was focusing this technology on the car phone.

    Cooper wanted people to have freedom to talk on the phone away from their cars. So in reaction, he and Motorola embarked on a project to create a more portable device.

    Motorola spent three months building a prototype for a portable, mobile handset that Cooper publicly demonstrated in April of 1973. The company’s first commercial cellular phone, the DynaTAC, went on sale 10 years later.

    Cooper, now 81, is founder of ArrayComm, a company working to improve cellular networks, smart antenna and wireless communication. He and his wife are also inventors of the Jitterbug, a simplified cell phone geared to senior citizens.

    On the cell phone

    Cooper was surprised when his landline dropped our call. After calling him back on his mobile, we had a chance to ask him about the creation of the device that changed the face of communication as we know it.

    Here is an edited transcript of our conversation:

    CNN: What was the technology climate like back in 1973, and what gave you the idea to move with the cell phone and compete with AT T’s car phone?

    Cooper: There were no large-scale integrated circuits, no computers, no closed-circuit televisions, no LCD screens — I can’t tell you all the things that did not exist in 1973. But, we’d been building phones for years and years in cars, and we [Motorola] thought the time was ready for personal communication, ’cause people are just naturally mobile.

    For 100 years, people wanting to talk on the phone have been constrained by being tied to their desks or their homes with a wire, and now we’re going to trap them in their cars? That’s not good.

    So we decided to take on AT T. By 1973, we decided to put on a dazzling presentation, and I decided the best way to do that was to build a phone and have someone actually have the experience of talking on a real personal handheld telephone. And that was the genesis of that phone that we built.

    When did you make that first phone call? Who was it to?

    I thought everybody knew the answer to that question! The first public call was made out on the streets of New York. It was to [Joel S. Engel], the head of the cellular program at AT T. I called and told him, Joel, I’m calling you from a cellular phone, a real cellular phone, a handheld, portable, real cellular phone.

    I don’t remember exactly what he said, but it was really quiet for a while. My assumption was that he was grinding his teeth. He was very polite and ended the call. When asked about it, he says he has no recollection of this moment.

    What were the reactions to the cell phone like? Did people think it was unbelievable, impossible, unnecessary?

    Well, people were dazzled by the concept! It was beyond imagination that more than half the people in the world would have these phones. But people were absolutely amazed by the fact that you could hold the phone up to your ear, walk around and make a phone call.

    Remember, there were not even any cordless phones at that time. We had a press conference [in 1973], and I handed the phone to this young lady journalist and told her to make a phone call. And she said, Can I call my mother in Australia? and I said, Sure! And she did that.

    This woman was just spellbound, she couldn’t imagine how this little phone could reach more than halfway around the world, and talk to her mother who actually answered the phone. Sophisticated New Yorkers were standing there with their mouths open.

    The reception was quite extraordinary. The chairman of our company happened to be in Washington the time we did the next demonstration [in the early 1980s]. He visited with the vice president . [George H.W. Bush] . and showed him this new phone, and he was so taken by the phone.

    He said, Well, I have to show this to Ron. And the next thing you know he was showing it to Ronald Reagan. And Reagan asks, What’s keeping us from having this?

    What did the phone look like? How much did it cost and who actually bought it?

    The phone [was] about 10 or 11 inches high, about 1 1/2 inches across, and about 4 inches deep. It weighed about 2 1/2 pounds.

    How much did it cost?

    If you think about it, this is not a commercial product and if you had to build one it would cost about a million dollars. By the time we built a commercial product, it was 10 years later. We didn’t sell that product until October of 1983, and the phone then cost $3,900. So that would be like buying a phone today for $10,000.

    That’s quite a lot of money. Who actually bought these phones?

    Well, I wouldn’t say it was large number of people; in fact it was a very small number. In the beginning it was wealthy people, but also people who had to be on the move. It was for people like real estate agents and doctors, who were already more accustomed to technology because they were using pagers.

    Cell phones didn’t really get to be a big deal til about another seven or eight years later. Everybody thinks that the cell phone has always been here and that it’s always been popular, but it wasn’t until 1990 — before there were as few as a million cell phones in the world — that’s where it started to really explode.

    Did you ever think the phone would ever be available to everyone?

    Well, we knew that someday everybody would have a [cell] phone, but it was hard to imagine that that would happen in my lifetime. And now we’ve got almost five billion phones in the world. Wow.

    How do you feel about the advancements cell phones have made, especially with features like apps and cameras, etc.?

    I must tell you as much as we were dreamers, we never imagined that all these things could be combined into one, and I’m really not so sure that it’s a great thing. Phones have gotten so complicated, so hard to use, that you wonder if this is designed for real people or for engineers.

    I think what’s really going to happen is we’re going to have a lot of different kinds of phones when our industry grows up — some that are just plain, simple telephones. In fact, my wife and I started a company, and she designed the Jitterbug, which is just a simple telephone.

    What kind of phone do you have now?

    I’m sitting here looking at all of my phones. I’m talking to you on a phone I’m trying out for a company in Europe. It’s called the Vertu, and this phone starts at $5,000. And that’s for the very cheap model. You could buy a solid-gold version of this phone.

    So this phone, even with inflation, costs about half as much as your first cell phone.

    Yep, and really this phone is not a really complicated phone. It does have a phonebook in it, it does reach certain parts of the Web, but it’s not a PDA. You can’t read e-mail on it; it doesn’t have a camera on it. It really is a basic telephone.

    I also have a Droid. I got a Motorola Droid that I use. I also have a Jitterbug. I’m always trying whatever the latest telephone is. I had an iPhone for a while, I gave that to my grandson. Kids are really caught up in that. But I think that the Android phones are catching up now, and the latest version of the Android phones are every bit as good, if not better, than the iPhone.

    On the cell phone On the cell phone On the cell phone On the cell phone On the cell phone On the cell phone



    Categories
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    Free Government Cell Phone Plan – Service – Free Government Phones, on the cell phone.

    #On #the #cell #phone



    Free Government Cell Phone Service

    On the cell phone

    Get up to 500 anytime minutes per month and pay nothing .

    Apply now for your free cellular plan and free cell phone and receive your handset in just a few days.

    Easy Application

    On the cell phone

    It s simple to apply on-line for this Lifeline subsidized plan. Just click on your state above. Your state’s page will have an details of the wireless plan available to you and a link to the on-line ordering process.

    Read the qualification requirements, fill out the form, then submit. Your order will be processsed as soon as we get your order and any required proof of qualifications documents. Your free mobile phone will be on it s way to you, ready to use with Lifeline wireless plan minutes. You should receive your new handset in just a few days.

    You ll never receive a bill and your minutes will replenish every month. If you need more minutes you may purchase them at a reduced rate.

    Do I Qualify for a Free Government Mobile Plan?

    On the cell phone

    Free government phone service is made possible by the Lifeline program. Lifeline is a Federal program that gives you a discount on basic telephone plans because it is subsidized by the government, making it more affordable for low income families. That Lifeline discount provides the free minutes for you to use each month. Those that are currently enrolled in a government assistance program like Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Medicaid, SSI, National School Lunch Free Lunch Program, etc. are qualified for Lifeline. You can also qualify based on your household income.

    Expert Cellular is the place for a Free Government Phone plan.

    On the cell phone

    No Contract

    A cellphone can be a life saver. Make sure your family has the security that mobile service can provide.

    Free Long Distance – Your free wireless plan includes long distance calling. Eliminate those long distance charges from your home phone bill!

    You can get the peace of mind knowing your loved ones are safe and secure by just calling them. Now you can have a mobile phone that will keep you in touch with those you care about. Don’t wait any longer. Fill out your application today. Start by clicking on your state.

    Being available to those that need you can make a difference. Don’t miss that important call from your childs school, from your employer, or about that job interview.



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    Assurance Wireless, Get a Free Cell Phone up to 250 Min, on the cell phone.

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    Assurance Wireless

    If you reached our Assurance Wireless page from a search, we recommend first reading our free government cell phone main page for helpful general information before reading this article.

    Assurance Wireless is one of the largest and fastest growing Lifeline Assistance cell phone carriers operating in the United States. Assurance Wireless provides eligible customers with a (1) Free Cell Phone; (2) 250 FREE Voice Minutes; and (3) UNLIMITED FREE Texts each and every month. These are added automatically with no cost to you. However, if you want to go beyond the basics, you can by adding amounts as low as $5/month to get additional services, like more texts or more minutes.

    They also have unlimited cell phone plans available for very reasonable prices. To top it off, you can buy Virgin Mobile Top-Up cards from thousands of retail locations across the country as well as online with a credit card or even PayPal.

    Even if you do not purchase additional minutes, Assurance Wireless (and Virgin Mobile) is still compensated by the government that pays subsidies to them to cover the cost of the cell phone and monthly cell service fees. If you are struggling to pay your bills, this is something than can really help you.

    So, if you were suspicious about why Assurance Wireless would give out free cell phones and minutes, you now know. They receive $10 per subscriber from the government s Universal Service Fund and YOU get a free cell phone and monthly minutes at no charge.

    Get a Free Government Cell Phone From Assurance Wireless

    The process of getting a free government cell phone is simple and straightforward. First, you need to see if Assurance Wireless provides service in your state. If your state is not listed below, don t fret! Assurance Wireless is quickly rolling our service to new states. Please visit this page again as we regularly update the content on this website.

    In the mean time, there may be other free government cell phone providers that offer service in your state. In this case, we recommend visiting our other pages for free government cell phone carriers to determine if they provide service in your state. You can find links to numerous free cell phone carriers to the left of this article.

    Next, you should review the eligibility requirements for your particular state. After this, if you think you are eligible, you simply fill out an application with supporting documentation and you will quickly find out if you can get a free cell phone from Assurance Wireless.

    Assurance Wireless Eligibility Requirements

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    Assurance Wireless Offers Free Cell Phones to Eligible Customers

    Eligibility requirements for the Assurance Wireless program can vary from state to state. Consequently, we strongly recommend checking your state of residence s specific eligibility requirements before applying to Assurance Wireless. That being said, in general if you already receive government assistance, such as Food Stamps, Section 8, Social Security, Medicaid, etc, then there is a good chance you qualify for the Assurance Wireless program. Please check your state s list of eligible government assistance programs to see if you qualify for Assurance Wireless.

    Even if you don t currently participate in an eligible government assistance program, you may still be able to qualify for Assurance Wireless service under income eligibility guidelines. Not all states allow applicants to qualify for service under income guidelines. However, those that do require an applicant s total household income to be at or below 100-150% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines. The majority of states that allow an applicant to qualify under income guidelines require that an applicant s total household income is at or below 135% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines. We have listed these values in the table below for your convenience.



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    Cell Phone Reviews, Cell Phones Review, on the cell phone.

    #On #the #cell #phone



    Cell Phones Reviews

    Top Phones on Every Carrier

    We test and rate hundreds of mobile phones each year. These are the 10 best you can get right now.

    Fastest Mobile Networks

    Before buying your next phone, find out which carrier has the fastest data network near you.

    The Best Android Phones

    The greatest thing about Google’s mobile OS: Your choice of handsets on all the major wireless carriers.

    Top Picks: Phones for Kids

    Trust us, your kid wants a phone. But which one is best? Check out our recommendations.

    Price
    Brand
    Service Provider
    Operating System as Tested
    Form Factor
    Phone Capability / Network
    Editors Ratings
    Awards

    Samsung Galaxy S8 Active Review

    Bottom Line: The Samsung Galaxy S8 Active takes the best phone of the year, makes it tougher, and packs in a bigger battery. It’s the ultimate rugged phone—but it’s only available on AT ?>

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    Discount Cell Phone Accessories, Tablet Accessories, iPad Accessories, on the cell phone.

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    Popular Cell Phone and Tablet Accessories at a Discount

    On the cell phone

    Samsung Galaxy S8 Otterbox Symmetry Rugged Case – Clear Crystal

    List Price: $39.95

    On the cell phone

    Apple MacBook Air 13 inch STM dux for MacBook Air 13

    List Price: $59.99

    On the cell phone

    Apple iPad Pro 9.7 Naztech MFI Lightning Charge and Sync USB Braided 4ft Cable – Black

    List Price: $29.99

    On the cell phone

    Samsung Galaxy S7 Special Buy – UMA 2.8Amp Premium USB Car Charger with Extra USB Port

    List Price: $29.99

    On the cell phone

    Apple iPhone 7 Plus Body Glove Satin Case – Paradise Pink

    List Price: $24.99

    On the cell phone

    Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge Otterbox Strada Leather Folio Protective Case – Ruby Romance Red

    List Price: $49.95

    On the cell phone

    Apple iPhone 7 Plus Otterbox Symmetry Rugged Case – Black Crystal

    List Price: $49.95

    On the cell phone

    Samsung Galaxy S8 Plus HyperGear Flexi USB-C Charge and Sync Flat 6 Foot Cable – White

    List Price: $16.99

    On the cell phone

    Samsung Galaxy S8 Nite Ize Clip Case Executive – Black

    List Price: $22.19

    On the cell phone

    Apple iPad Mini 4 Otterbox Symmetry Series Tablet Folio – Merlot Shadow

    List Price: $59.95

    On the cell phone

    Apple iPhone 7 Otterbox uniVERSE Rugged Case – Black

    List Price: $49.95

    On the cell phone

    Apple iPhone 7 Puregear Express Folio Wallet Case With Card Holder – Black And Gray

    List Price: $39.99

    On the cell phone

    Samsung Galaxy S8 Naztech Roadstar 5 USB 12A Car Charger and Hub – Black

    List Price: $39.99

    On the cell phone

    Samsung Galaxy S7 Otterbox Defender Rugged Interactive Case and Holster – Steel Berry Blue and Gray

    List Price: $49.95

    On the cell phone

    Samsung Galaxy S8 Puregear Softtek Case – Blue Stripe

    List Price: $34.99

    On the cell phone

    Apple iPad Mini 4 OtterBox Utility Series Latch II with Accessory Pack – Black and Black

    List Price: $39.99

    Find the latest mobile phone accessories including cell phone cases, cell phone chargers, batteries, holsters, bluetooth headsets, phone data kits and more at a discount. Shop OEM accessories from all major brands including Blackberry Accessories, Motorola Accessories, Nokia Accessories, Samsung, HTC, LG for Verizon, AT ?>

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    Cell Phone Directory, Cell Phone Reverse Lookup, Cell Phone Registry, on the cell phone.

    #On #the #cell #phone



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    Welcome to the National Registry of Cellular Numbers

    NRCN is the leading cell phone directory and provider of online cell phone lookups. Our powerful cell phone directory tool searches the largest database of Landline, Mobile and Unlisted Phone Numbers to bring you the most up-to-date and accurate data. Please use the form below to lookup cell phone numbers instantly.

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    Report May Include: Full Name and Full Address associated with the number, Cell Phone or Phone Carrier information, Date of Birth, Phone Numbers, Dates of Issuance.

    On the cell phoneAddress

    On the cell phoneBackground Checks

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    On the cell phoneCriminal Records

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    On the cell phoneBirth Records

    On the cell phoneDeath Records

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    Copyright 2008 – 2017 CellphoneRegistry.org. All Rights Reserved.

    Unauthorized duplication, distribution, or copying in any way is prohibited by law and will be prosecuted.

    This website is not affiliated with the United States Government or any Federal or State government agency.

    By using this site, cell phone directory and reverse cell phone lookup, you certify that you will use any information obtained for lawfully acceptable purposes. Please be advised that it is against the law to use the information obtained from this site to stalk or harass others. Search requests on public officials, juveniles, and/or celebrities are strictly prohibited. Users who request information under false pretenses or use data obtained from this site in contravention of the law may be subject to civil criminal penalties. All searches are subject to terms of use and applicable law. Information contained herein is derived from records that may have errors and/or not always be accurate or complete.