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Salt Lake City, Utah, United States # Video

#Cities #in #utah

Salt Lake City, Utah, United States # Video, REMMONT.COM

Cities in utah

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Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City, state capital and seat (1849) of Salt Lake county, north-central Utah, U.S., on the Jordan River at the southeastern end of Great Salt Lake. The world capital of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints ( Mormons), it influences the social, economic, political, and cultural life of the people in a wide area of Utah and bordering regions of Idaho, Nevada, and Wyoming. Built on benches of ancient Lake Bonneville, the city (approximate elevation 4,300 feet [1,300 metres]) lies at the foot of the Wasatch Range, which rises more than 1 mile (1.6 km) above the Salt Lake valley floor. Salt Lake City is at the centre of an urbanized band along the mountains that includes Ogden to the north and Provo to the south. Inc. 1851. Area city, 111 square miles (287 square km). Pop. (2000) 181,743; Salt Lake City Metro Area, 968,858; (2010) 186,440; Salt Lake City Metro Area, 1,124,197.

Ute and Shoshone Indians were early inhabitants of the area. The city was founded in 1847 by Brigham Young and a band of 148 Mormons as a refuge from religious persecution and was known as Great Salt Lake City until 1868. Laid out by Young according to Joseph Smith’s plan for the city of Zion, the city was divided into 10-acre (4-hectare) blocks bounded by wide streets grouped around the Temple Block (now known as Temple Square). Mormon immigrants from the East and Europe flocked to the “New Jerusalem,” the “City of the Saints,” in the Provisional State of Deseret (a Book of Mormon word interpreted as “honeybee”). The California Gold Rush of 1849 contributed to the city’s growth.

After the Treaty of Guadalupe H > Utah War of 1857–58, when General Albert Sidney Johnston’s troops marched through the city to establish Camp Floyd west of Utah Lake. Social and religious conflict between Mormons and non-Mormons continued to influence the life of the city for a century.

The opening of the mining industry in the early 1860s and completion (1870) of the Utah Central Railroad, connecting Salt Lake City with the Union Pacific at Ogden, along with other rail connections, made the city a thriving hub of Western commerce. The city’s population grew steadily in the first half of the 20th century, reaching a high in 1960 before declining. The number of residents began rising again in the 1970s and achieved the 1960 level in the early 21st century. Salt Lake City was the host of the 2002 Olympic Winter Games.

The contemporary city

Mining operations near Salt Lake City produce copper, gold, molybdenum, platinum, selenium, silver, lead, and zinc, and various salts are produced from the lake. The city is a regional trade and transportation centre and has an international airport. Services such as government, education, health care, and financial and business services are a major part of the economy. High-technology industries and telecommunications are also primary factors. Printing and publishing are important, and manufactures include medical products, computer equipment, software, and aerospace products. Tourism contributes greatly to the economy, with more than a dozen ski areas located near the city. It is also a trade, processing, and transportation centre for agricultural products from nearby irrigated farmlands.

Educational institutions include the University of Utah (1850), Westminster College (1875), and Salt Lake Community College (1948). Salt Lake City is a world centre of genealogy research; the Family Search Center and Family History Library contain records of some two billion names. Monuments and buildings include the Mormon Tabernacle (1863–75; famous for its choir), Salt Lake Temple (1853–93), and the Seagull Monument (1913), all within Temple Square. Near the square are Beehive and Lion houses (res > State Capitol (1916), built of Utah granite and marble in Corinthian style, has an exhibition hall.

The city is the home of the Utah Jazz of the National Basketball Association. Cultural institutions include the state opera and symphony orchestra, the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, a children’s museum, and the Utah Museum of Natural History (on the university campus). Tracy Aviary in Liberty Park houses 135 species of birds. The Utah Shakespearean Festival is held annually from June through October. Wasatch National Forest adjoins the city on the east and north, and several state parks are in the vicinity. Fort Douglas, on the outskirts, was founded in 1862.

This article was most recently revised and updated by Amy Tikkanen, Corrections Manager.

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SOURCE: http://www.britannica.com/place/Salt-Lake-City

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Utah Vacation Planning and Things to Do + Video

#Utah #trip

Utah Vacation Planning and Things to Do + Video, NEF6.COM

Utah trip

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This is Utah. You’re Welcome.

Perfect powder, rugged red rock, alpine lakes and more. If Utah don’t got it, you don’t need it.

Every state thinks it’s fun. Every state claims to have “something for everyone.” But not every state has 3.5 distinct geographic regions, five national parks, 45 state parks, 5 national historic sites & trails, and a dozen national monuments & recreation areas.
Read more.

Utah’s Trail Country

Over 2000 miles of trail heaven. Come find your trail

Experience Utah’s 5 National Parks

With Southwest Adventure Tours

Monument Valley

3,000 yrs of not changing

Temple Square

The literal center of Salt Lake

Experience Utah’s 5 National Parks

With Southwest Adventure Tours

that Kanab-solutely Blow Your Mind

City on the rise

Experience Utah’s 5 National Parks

With Southwest Adventure Tours

Play In Davis

Shopping, restaurants, and more. Near Downtown SLC

Outdoor adventure meets urban life

In Park City

enchanting moments surround you

Home of Dinosaur National Monument

Bryce Canyon

Stay at Ruby’s Inn and see Thor’s Hammer

Request a Free Travel Guide

Utah is big & beautiful. Learn everything.

Not every state lets you ski and golf and go to the ballet in one day. Not every state has 12,000 years of human history and fry sauce. We’re sorry. We know it’s not fair. But hey, Utah’s landlocked, so at least it doesn’t have nice beaches. (No, wait. Actually, it does.)

So while we feel an appropriate amount of guilt over our state being disproportionately fantastic, we’re also not going to hide Utah’s light under a bushel. That’d be selfish. And we’re not selfish. We love sharing our state. In fact, we want to help you plan a Utah vacation right now. Check the Travel Tips below for a few ideas!

Travel Tips

10 Days. 1,900 Miles. 9 Icons of the West.

5 Stunning Sites in Capitol Reef National Park

4 best S.Utah hiking trips

Search Like a Local

If you’re the goal-oriented, list-making type, visiting Utah ain’t easy. You want to see everything, you really do, but you just can’t. Every time you set out to check something off your bucket list, you end up adding three more.

A tidy little three-day weekend in Zion might inspire a trip to Coral Pink Sand Dunes, which leads to Rocking V Cafe in Kanab, then Highway 12 Scenic Byway, then the Burr Trail, and the next thing you know you’re becoming a True Aggie under a full moon. In a rock climbing harness for some reason.

Or you plan a ski trip to one Utah resort and realize you can drive an hour and ski 10 more. But while you’re there, someone on the lift says something about buffalo and the world’s preeminent work of land art at the edge of the largest saltwater lake in the Western Hemisphere, so now you have to do that, too. Before dinner and a concert downtown.

Well Utah.com is here to pile on. We’ve made it our mission to aggregate all the always-awesome, often-obscure adventures that could only occur in our lovely Deseret. It’s a local view of weird and awesome stuff you didn’t know you couldn’t live without. We’ve done our best to help you see them efficiently with essential info and helpful itineraries, but touring Utah is like falling into quicksand: Every move you make sucks you deeper into its thrall.

So we’re sorry to deliver a fantastic bit of bad news: It’s mathematically impossible to finish your Utah bucket list. But we’ll help you plan the trip you’ll be talking about on your deathbed.

Get busy rolling your rock up and down the Rockies, little Sisyphuses!

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SOURCE: http://utah.com/